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Which english accent do you prefer? British English or American English? Options
Nendo
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 10:41:40 AM
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I prefer British accent because it sounds more formal and posh to me. :)
pedro
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 10:52:28 AM
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thar
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 10:56:09 AM

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Does it have to be either/or? Personally I love Australian (you cannot be angry at someone with that accent!) and, in a different way, New Zealand - just the right blend of open but gentle Whistle !

Of course I am generalising there, there are variations.
- but not as much as you are - most 'English people' do not speak standard southern English - in fact only a small proportion do.
- I don't know if you would think regional accents formal and posh - Liverpool, North-East, Yorkshire, Lancashire, many others, and my favourite - Birmingham Dancing .
They are not what you might consider to be formal and posh!

Whistle Whistle

edit
written before seeing pedro's post
curmudgeonine
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 11:32:11 AM

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Location: Orillia, Ontario, Canada
There are so many American accents, and so many British accents. I like Canada's Newfoundland's accent, the Irish, Scottish, Yorkshire, Tennessee, New England.
TL Hobs
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 11:37:06 AM
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Location: Kenai, Alaska, United States

Personally, I speak Arkansaw.

RamufAznag
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 11:42:13 AM

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Location: Hirātī, Helmand, Afghanistan
My all time favourite is Italian british.
IMcRout
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 12:19:05 PM
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towan52
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 12:22:37 PM
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As it goes, John, I prefer Tex-Mex.
Westley Payne
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 1:47:59 PM

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british
Azam Siraj
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 1:49:32 PM

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Location: New Delhi, NCT, India
British accent
xsmith
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 2:14:40 PM
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Brooklynese : I live on toidy-toid and toid.
DDuck
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 3:05:54 PM
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I would say British English, although there are so many that is difficult to just pick one.
Ferdinand Zanni
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 4:38:58 PM

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I reckon Canadian English is easy to follow.
reinsalkas
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 4:50:33 PM
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Location: Rafaela, Santa Fe, Argentina
British English, this kind: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tym0MObFpTI the first minute

And Sean Connery's English.

s_galle
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 5:34:49 PM

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probably would go for British
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 5:52:32 PM

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I prefer the accent I'm talked to.
R E H
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 6:41:06 PM

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Location: Stony Mountain, Manitoba, Canada
There is no American, British, or Canadian accent. There are dozens of different regional accents emanating from those countries.
Maryam Dad
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 6:47:37 PM

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I like Northern British accents. Liverpool, Northeast, Yorkshire, Lancashire, Edinburgh, Glasgow. I like Australian accent too.
Maryam Dad
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 6:59:02 PM

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I thought that /th/ sounding /f/ was only in Cockney accent but when I hear Manchester United fans speaking, many of them pronounce /th/ like /f/ too. Either it's true the myth that many United fans are glory hunter fans from London or /th/ --> /f/ is not exclusively Cockney.
2015Febechukwu E105
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 7:26:22 PM

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Nendo wrote:
I prefer British accent because it sounds more formal and posh to me. :)

Same, British, it sounds fancy and like James Bond.
Marguerite
Posted: Friday, March 21, 2014 8:11:45 PM

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Location: Hebron, Connecticut, United States
When I moved to New England from Chicago, Yankees who ask me from where in Europe I was for they couldn't quite identify my accent.
Absurdicuss
Posted: Sunday, March 23, 2014 8:03:46 AM
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Location: Jefferson, South Carolina, United States
The children of Gujarati convenience store owners raised in South Carolina have a unique blend of of southern drawl and Indian lilt.

As for accents I prefer my wife's deep southern country, especially when she says "come an git it".
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, March 23, 2014 8:50:24 PM

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Hi Maryam.

You're right - I think the major 'city' accents of England are drifting towards each other, becoming more similar to each other.

The /f/ sound for /th/ is fairly normal now in Manchester and (I think) Birmingham - I don't think is has spread to Liverpool, yet!

"Weren't nuffink to do wi' me boss, I dint do nuffink."

It is the same with the pronunciation (and spelling) of 'have' as 'of' - "I would of done it if I could of."
This has now spread from London through the cities.

Yet again, I'll post my favourite video of a real British accent - probably not what Nendo is talking about, though.
Here's Millen-Eve.
Tovarish
Posted: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 3:32:11 AM
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What a darling little girl, unfortunatly I could only understand the occasional word.
Alice M Toaster
Posted: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 10:55:30 AM

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Can anyone tell what type of accent Jeremy Clarkson of "Top Gear" has?
towan52
Posted: Friday, March 28, 2014 12:10:11 PM
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Alice Morgan wrote:
Can anyone tell what type of accent Jeremy Clarkson of "Top Gear" has?


It's an assumed "standard" English accent. He is from Yorkshire originally and either consciously or otherwise, moderated his accent for professional reasons - hence assumed! I did much the same to lose my East London/Essex accent.
gradyone
Posted: Saturday, March 29, 2014 11:56:48 PM

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Rolling Stone magazine once polled readers to select a singer with
"the quintessential American voice." The winner?

. . . . . . Willie Nelson
Debora Wienda Rosari
Posted: Sunday, April 27, 2014 11:19:49 AM

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I came from a non-English-speaking country. Some people I know, who were born and raised in the country (perhaps never even been abroad), adopt British accent very eagerly to the point where it's downright ridiculous.

Don't get me wrong. I do love British accent. But when it's spoken by Jonathan Rhys Meyers, for example. Boo hoo!
doobee
Posted: Monday, May 5, 2014 5:18:10 PM

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I love to listen to British accent,but I love to speak like Americans.
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