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The Added Bonus of Repetitive Redundancies Options
MiTziGo
Posted: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 12:21:36 PM
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We were assembled together in the Pretty Ugly Oxymorons thread, when someone said something about "fair trials." After a brief moment, I realized my next mission was clearly evident—I needed to begin a thread discussing the excess verbiage plaguing society. I can hardly wait to see the final outcome of this thread!
Luftmarque
Posted: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 1:03:42 PM

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At this point in time I cannot think of anything to contribute, but I'll think on it.
fred
Posted: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 1:13:47 PM
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MichalG wrote:
We were assembled together in the Pretty Ugly Oxymorons thread, when someone said something about "fair trials." After a brief moment, I realized my next mission was clearly evident—I needed to begin a thread discussing the excess verbiage plaguing society. I can hardly wait to see the final outcome of this thread!


I am guilty of most of the above.
However, I would like to point out that a moment could last experientially more than a clocked moment.

"As I was standing in my garden showing off my new roses to all the members of the Rose Club, I felt a large number of fire ants had found their way through my panty hose. There was nothing to do but pull down my panty hose and wildly brush off the devil ants. As I stood there holding my panty hose at arms length, a feeling of death hung over me for what seemed like an eternity."
MiTziGo
Posted: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 1:24:10 PM
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Ah, a moment can feel like an eternity, but it is, by definition, only a brief period of time. Thus, using "brief" to describe a moment is redundant.
fred
Posted: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 1:26:36 PM
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MichalG wrote:
Ah, a moment can feel like an eternity, but it is, by definition, only a brief period of time. Thus, using "brief" to describe a moment is redundant.


How would you describe a moment that is not brief?
kaliedel
Posted: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 2:32:29 PM
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MichalG wrote:
We were assembled together in the Pretty Ugly Oxymorons thread, when someone said something about "fair trials." After a brief moment, I realized my next mission was clearly evident—I needed to begin a thread discussing the excess verbiage plaguing society. I can hardly wait to see the final outcome of this thread!


I didn't realize until now that I use almost all of those when writing. I guess you could say it's clearly evident that I'm redundant...?
bugdoctor
Posted: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 5:08:55 PM
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"
How about a 'prolonged moment'? That phrase seems to be commonplace.
cavarden
Posted: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 5:25:25 PM
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As a Spanish speaker, I find that English tends to use more redundancies anyway. A very frequent one is a period of time (which has already appeared in this thread). In Spanish we just say "a period" and we assume it's "of time". Another common one is, "43 percent of all adults..."--a percentage is, by definition, a portion of the whole, so it's redundant to say "of all". But maybe these are just biased opinions of a Spanish speaker.
prolixitysquared
Posted: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 8:30:26 PM
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cavarden wrote:
As a Spanish speaker, I find that English tends to use more redundancies anyway. A very frequent one is a period of time (which has already appeared in this thread). In Spanish we just say "a period" and we assume it's "of time". Another common one is, "43 percent of all adults..."--a percentage is, by definition, a portion of the whole, so it's redundant to say "of all". But maybe these are just biased opinions of a Spanish speaker.


Those are such good points. I think as native speakers to English, we often bypass so much of our own redundancies because we've heard them so many times that it doesn't phase us to look into our speech and writing deeper, at least for this type of silly manner.

I feel like making myself a list of these phrases so I can make a point to weed them out of my habits.
krmiller
Posted: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 11:24:38 PM
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I think English speakers have to be specific when talking about "a period" so no one thinks we're referring to menstruation! I assume Spanish has a different common term for that.
accidental visitor
Posted: Monday, April 13, 2009 11:37:21 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 4/13/2009
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fred wrote:
MichalG wrote:
Ah, a moment can feel like an eternity, but it is, by definition, only a brief period of time. Thus, using "brief" to describe a moment is redundant.


How would you describe a moment that is not brief?


Well, I'd say a while
begich
Posted: Monday, April 13, 2009 1:20:26 PM
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Just to demonstrate how abundant redundancies are in our language, check out
some that George Carlin came up with:

An now for some favorite, everyday redundancies.....................

added bonus
exactly right
closed fist
future potential
inner core
money-back refund
seeing the sights
true fact
revert back
safe haven
prior history
young children
time period
sum total
end result
temper tantrum
ferryboat
free gift
bare naked
combined total
unique individual
potential hazard
joint cooperation
Betsy D.
Posted: Monday, April 13, 2009 10:33:08 PM
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Location: Pennsylvania
fred wrote:
MichalG wrote:
Ah, a moment can feel like an eternity, but it is, by definition, only a brief period of time. Thus, using "brief" to describe a moment is redundant.


How would you describe a moment that is not brief?


How about a "lingering moment"? Or a "suspended moment"?
klee
Posted: Tuesday, April 14, 2009 5:20:27 PM
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bugdoctor wrote:
"
How about a 'prolonged moment'? That phrase seems to be commonplace.


No, that would be an oxymoron.
klee
Posted: Tuesday, April 14, 2009 5:22:31 PM
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prolixitysquared wrote:
cavarden wrote:
As a Spanish speaker, I find that English tends to use more redundancies anyway. A very frequent one is a period of time (which has already appeared in this thread). In Spanish we just say "a period" and we assume it's "of time". Another common one is, "43 percent of all adults..."--a percentage is, by definition, a portion of the whole, so it's redundant to say "of all". But maybe these are just biased opinions of a Spanish speaker.


Those are such good points. I think as native speakers to English, we often bypass so much of our own redundancies because we've heard them so many times that it doesn't phase us to look into our speech and writing deeper, at least for this type of silly manner.

I feel like making myself a list of these phrases so I can make a point to weed them out of my habits.


My father-in-law says that all the time! "For the longest period of time, we waited for the light to turn..." It annoys me a little. I would think to myself: "Just say,'We waited for the light to turn for a long time.'"
tscanla
Posted: Saturday, April 25, 2009 8:51:13 AM
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Let's also do away with the phrase "over time" as in, "Over time the rate will fluctuate." Doesn't every event in the past, present, or future occur over time?
Joseph Glantz
Posted: Sunday, May 3, 2009 10:35:39 AM
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Joined: 3/18/2009
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klee wrote:
prolixitysquared wrote:
cavarden wrote:
As a Spanish speaker, I find that English tends to use more redundancies anyway. A very frequent one is a period of time (which has already appeared in this thread). In Spanish we just say "a period" and we assume it's "of time". Another common one is, "43 percent of all adults..."--a percentage is, by definition, a portion of the whole, so it's redundant to say "of all". But maybe these are just biased opinions of a Spanish speaker.


Those are such good points. I think as native speakers to English, we often bypass so much of our own redundancies because we've heard them so many times that it doesn't phase us to look into our speech and writing deeper, at least for this type of silly manner.

I feel like making myself a list of these phrases so I can make a point to weed them out of my habits.


My father-in-law says that all the time! "For the longest period of time, we waited for the light to turn..." It annoys me a little. I would think to myself: "Just say,'We waited for the light to turn for a long time.'"


Well, the survey could be 43 percent of some category of adults - 43 percent of left-handed adults or 43 percent of tall adults.

I think the period/point of time is mathematical. If one plots a grid of the 20th century on the x axis - then it's logical to say that some event occured (say 1950) at the point 1/2 way along the x axis time line

early_apex
Posted: Thursday, May 7, 2009 9:08:32 AM
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Joined: 4/20/2009
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Location: Spindletop, Texas, United States
begich wrote:
Just to demonstrate how abundant redundancies are in our language, check out
some that George Carlin came up with:

An now for some favorite, everyday redundancies.....................

added bonus
exactly right
closed fist
future potential
inner core
money-back refund
seeing the sights
true fact
revert back
safe haven
prior history
young children
time period
sum total
end result
temper tantrum
ferryboat
free gift
bare naked
combined total
unique individual
potential hazard
joint cooperation


Don't forget hot water heater. Probably a combination of water heater and hot water tank. GC was good to point out absurdities in our everyday speech.

"Free gift" is one of my favorites, although I'm sure advertisers feel it is important to imply that there are no strings attached.

Is there any justification for saying "rate of speed"?
789789
Posted: Sunday, September 19, 2010 1:09:13 PM
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Joined: 6/12/2009
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Location: Canada
As a living person, I would like to say that I have a canine dog.


That good enough for y'all?
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Sunday, September 19, 2010 1:27:09 PM

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Joined: 9/21/2009
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What is an living English speaker?
789789
Posted: Sunday, September 19, 2010 1:47:37 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/12/2009
Posts: 141
Neurons: 117
Location: Canada
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
What is an living English speaker?


Well I thought it was redundant since I am speaking, I am alive, therefore it's redundant.

I guess it wasn't very good. Let me fix it.
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