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Pierre Boulle (1912) Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, February 20, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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Pierre Boulle (1912)

At the start of WWII, engineer Pierre Boulle enlisted in the French Army. Later, while a secret agent for the Free French, he was captured and imprisoned in a labor camp, an experience that inspired him to write his acclaimed work of historical fiction The Bridge over the River Kwai. Its 1957 film adaptation won seven Oscars, including one for screenplay that was awarded to Boulle since the actual writers had been blacklisted as communist sympathizers. What other famous novel did he pen? More...
rogermue
Posted: Thursday, February 20, 2014 12:49:50 AM

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I like his novel The Planet of the Apes so much that I want to transfer the note on the novel in TFD's article to this place:

Planet of the Apes

In 1963, following several other reasonably successful novels, Pierre Boulle published his other famous novel, La planète des singes, translated in 1964 as Monkey Planet by Xan Fielding, and later re-issued as Planet of the Apes. The novel was highly praised and given such reviews as this example from England's Guardian newspaper; "Classic science fiction...full of suspense and satirical intelligence." In the year 2500 a group of astronauts, including journalist Ulysse Merou, voyage to a planet in the star system of Betelgeuse. They land to discover a bizarre world where intelligent apes are the Master Race and humans are reduced to savages: caged in zoos, used in laboratory experiments and hunted for sport. The story of Ulysse's capture, his struggle to survive, and the shattering climax as he returns to earth and a horrific final discovery is gripping and fantastic. Yet the novel is also a wry parable on science, evolution and the relationship between man and animal.

I have read the novel in French and I find this science fiction novel outstanding, the style of the book even has literary qualities.
Guto André
Posted: Thursday, February 20, 2014 4:48:51 AM

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The Bridge over the River Kwai (1952) and Planet of the Apes (1963) that were both made into award-winning films.
Guto André
Posted: Thursday, February 20, 2014 4:54:11 AM

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"Planet of the apes" is very cool, but "The bridge over the river Kwai" I don't watch yet. Does someone indicate?
curmudgeonine
Posted: Thursday, February 20, 2014 9:15:40 AM

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I've never seen Bridge . . . but have always intended to. When I was in grades 4 and 5, they had us march into school to Col. Bogie's March played over the loudspeaker.
early_apex
Posted: Thursday, February 20, 2014 9:25:03 AM
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The Bridge on the River Kwai is an excellent war movie. Filmed in 1957, it stands apart from earlier WWII movies with its anti-war message. The movie does a good job of portraying that fact that the Japanese considered surrender to be a humiliation, and that any soldier who allowed themselves to be captured alive did not deserve humane treatment.

I visited a museum in Wise County, Texas where there is a display about the "Texas lost battalion". The unique thing about this incident is that almost all of the soldiers in this battalion were from the same part of Texas. They were forced to work on the "death railway" along with the other allied prisoners. On display are drawings of the men in their emaciated state piecing together fragments of cloth in order to fashion a U.S. flag to use in burial ceremonies for their dead comrades. A few survived the ordeal, and some of them wrote books about their experience, which are on display, along with other mementos. I have not been to the Austin museum shown in the link, but here is a page showing the Wise County museum (bottom picture). The homemade flag is on display in the case.
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