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disaffect Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, February 19, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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Joined: 3/7/2009
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Location: Inside Farlex computers
disaffect

(verb) Arouse hostility or indifference in where there had formerly been love, affection, or friendliness.

Synonyms: alienate, estrange

Usage: She loved him, but the sweaty gym clothes he left behind every time he borrowed her car began to seriously disaffect her.
Luker4
Posted: Wednesday, February 19, 2014 3:45:27 AM

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Joined: 11/19/2013
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Location: Wrocław Pracze, Lower Silesian Voivodeship, Poland
this time I know the word of the day Boo hoo!

disaffected adj

disaffection n

alienate v

alienation n

estrange v

estrangement n (separation)


Dancing




Gustavo de S Consoni
Posted: Wednesday, February 19, 2014 4:57:21 AM

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Joined: 12/22/2013
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Location: Ribeirão Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil
In the news:

They have celebrated the support their protest is getting from disaffected farmers who have not yet been paid for their last rice crop.
BBC Feb 9, 2014
TheParser
Posted: Wednesday, February 19, 2014 6:14:12 AM
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Joined: 9/21/2012
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How I admire the disaffected multitudes in Kiev, Bangkok, and Caracas!

I would be too cowardly to do what they are doing.
Guto André
Posted: Wednesday, February 19, 2014 6:38:09 AM

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Location: Vila Velha, Espirito Santo, Brazil
The polls have the power to transform heroes in disaffected.
Marguerite
Posted: Wednesday, February 19, 2014 8:25:17 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/26/2010
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Location: Hebron, Connecticut, United States
Disaffect is not a word I would use in casual conversation--it is the prefixe dis that throws me. Anyway here goes: i felt disaffection when it became abundantly clear that Obama had no intention of living up to his campaign promises. By the way for all those members whose first language is not English I am astonished at your facile use of the language. I still wrestle with my mother tongue, especially the spelling. And what is more astonishing still is the easy use of slang that you guys deploy. Amazing.
Christian Schmidt Q.
Posted: Wednesday, February 19, 2014 9:31:44 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 2/10/2014
Posts: 10
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Location: Santiago, Santiago, Chile
I think that is because there'll always be a certain distance to a second language, I mean a kind of detachment from the whole cultural environment where the language and its use is being determined for native speakers. It is interesting, for example, that you mention your uneasiness with the prefix "dis-", I'm sure you're not the only one native speaker having this experience. A non-native speaker lacks knowledge about such kind of details in casual conversation. Friends of mine keep reminding me these kind of things, I remember once having used the term "cachinnate", for example. We are much more exposed to written English (books, magazines, etc) than to casual conversation. Cheers!!
Gustavo de S Consoni
Posted: Wednesday, February 19, 2014 5:52:05 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/22/2013
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Location: Ribeirão Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil
Marguerite wrote:
Disaffect is not a word I would use in casual conversation--it is the prefixe dis that throws me. Anyway here goes: i felt disaffection when it became abundantly clear that Obama had no intention of living up to his campaign promises. By the way for all those members whose first language is not English I am astonished at your facile use of the language. I still wrestle with my mother tongue, especially the spelling. And what is more astonishing still is the easy use of slang that you guys deploy. Amazing.


Hello Marguerite!

I am not a native speaker and when I read your comment I became very happy. It makes me feel strong to study even more!
About the usage of the prefix "dis". Could I make some comments?
I feel very confortable with this words:
advantage - disatavantage
ability - disability
affirmation - disafirmation
Maybe because in portuguese we have similar words with the prefix "des". (cognates)

Thanks for your comment! I am feeling self-confident now.
gradyone
Posted: Wednesday, February 19, 2014 7:12:10 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/12/2010
Posts: 2,420
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Location: Virgil, Illinois, United States

Very good observation, CSQ. Studying and using a second language enable an objectivity unavailable to native speakers
who begin to acquire from birth the emotional baggage words carry. Our first encounters with language are shaped by what
was said and done to us by mother, father, sister, brother, etc. Throughout our lives we experience active, if unrecognized,
memories of events through which we learned our mother tongue, making it impossible to detach ourselves from how words
affect us beyond their actual meanings.

Whereas taking on a new language later in life brings out the scientist in us. We approach it as an object to contemplate,
dissect, assemble, memorize and synthesize its various parts and rules of usage in order to understand it well enough to put
it to work. However, the younger we are when exposed to a new language, the more we develop an emotional history with it.

Marguerite, In my 1983 Webster's Collegiate dictionary, there are ten pages of dis- words.
Here is my humble attempt to play on their various meanings. ..Angel

Poor dis-, overheard dissing the positive:
disavow, disgrace, dishonor
disagree, disconnect, disrupt
disdain, disgust, dislike
discombobulate, dismay and disorient
until there's no sunshine in its dishearten.

Dis-, let our discourse discover:
disarm, distinct, distinguish
discreet, disinfect, dispense
as glasses are filled with spirits
. . . distilled.
mangezi
Posted: Wednesday, February 19, 2014 7:54:55 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/27/2010
Posts: 253
Neurons: 65,799
Location: Stellenbosch, Western Cape, South Africa
Marguerite wrote:
Disaffect is not a word I would use in casual conversation--it is the prefixe dis that throws me. Anyway here goes: i felt disaffection when it became abundantly clear that Obama had no intention of living up to his campaign promises. By the way for all those members whose first language is not English I am astonished at your facile use of the language. I still wrestle with my mother tongue, especially the spelling. And what is more astonishing still is the easy use of slang that you guys deploy. Amazing.

_____________________________________

I'll take that as a compliment and say thank. I am not very sure though as your statement could be a double aged sabre, which I'm sure is.
Dosei Iantha Evans
Posted: Wednesday, February 19, 2014 10:01:20 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 1/25/2014
Posts: 49
Neurons: 25,619
Location: Naperville, Illinois, United States
i have a question
how do you not become a newbie?Eh?
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