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what is the name of this type of hat? Options
Khalid Sami
Posted: Thursday, February 6, 2014 8:17:41 PM
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Hello everybody!


Please, what is the name of the hat (if I could call it so) worn by the man in the picture below?






Thank you very much.
excaelis
Posted: Thursday, February 6, 2014 9:52:52 PM

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A bad hat.

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Yookincalmey Catfish
Posted: Thursday, February 6, 2014 10:16:33 PM

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in knitting it is often called simply an Icelandic ear flap hat.
Sameer md
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 12:58:34 AM

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Aviator hat.
HasmukhDoshi
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 1:25:33 AM
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It does not look like a hat. It looks like a muffler type cloth covering.

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rogermue
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 1:39:56 AM

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I would not call this thing a hat. I have no name for this kind of head covering/head wear/head gear
as it is obviously something typical of the Middle Ages. But even today you can see similar things sometimes.
It's a kind of hood.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 1:54:21 AM

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Icelanders use tail-cap, not this kind of ear-flap cap. This looks a bit like Andean chullo.
Knit caps are used all over the world with as many styles as are knitters, some have given special names, some not.

Names used (in English speaking world): knit cap, sock cap, tossel cap, beanie, ski hat, toboggan, burglar beanie, woolly hat, snookie, chook, tuque.



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jacobusmaximus
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 1:57:07 AM

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It is of a peculiar design more like a hood than a hat. It is rather like a mutch.

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thar
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 1:59:26 AM

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The design of it coming over the ears I would call a coif, although I would think of that as tighter to the skull and more delicate. I don't know if that loose cap would count as a coif.

The Icelandic earflap cap I would think of as that shape, but chunkier, in a coarse knit and patterned.
philânderos
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 3:08:13 AM

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It is called a biggin, a type of medieval headwear.

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rogermue
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 3:29:36 AM

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I've just looked up "biggin" (for a kind of cap) on the Internet. This is what I found:

big·gin, noun Archaic
1 a close-fitting cap worn especially by children in the 16th and 17th centuries.
2 a soft cap worn while sleeping; nightcap.

source: Link

Remark. A rare and archaic word for a historical kind of cap. I'm not sure whether many people know this word. By the way, the origin is French beguin, a kind of bonnet worn by women in earlier times.

How come you know such a rare word, philanderos? It is not even in Longman DCE or in Oxford OCE. Are you a historian?

thar
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 3:32:56 AM

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Applause

biggin it is.

Etymology[edit]

Colloquial French béguin (“bonnet”). The verb s’embéguiner ‘to wear a bonnet’ came to mean ‘to have a crush on someone’. The word itself came from béguine ‘beguine’ (lay nuns who typically wore such bonnets).


As in "does my head look biggin this?"

edit - oops, sorry did not see your post, roger.

The next question is how the biguin also links to the dance - "Begin the beguine..."

Quote:
Beguine (n.) late 15c., from French béguine (13c.), Medieval Latin beguina, a member of a women's spiritual order said to have been founded c.1180 in Liege in the Low Countries. They are said to take their name from the surname of Lambert le Bègue "Lambert the Stammerer," a Liege priest who was instrumental in their founding, and it's likely the word was pejorative at first.

The order generally preserved its reputation, though it quickly drew imposters who did not; nonetheless it eventually was condemned as heretical. A male order, called Beghards founded communities by the 1220s in imitation of them, but they soon degenerated (cf. Old French beguin "(male) Beguin," also "hypocrite") and wandered begging in the guise of religion; they likely were the source of the words beg and beggar, though there is disagreement over whether Beghard produced Middle Dutch beggaert "mendicant" or was produced by it.

Cole Porter's "Begin the Beguine" (1935) refers to a kind of popular dance of West Indian origin, from French colloquial béguin "an infatuation, boyfriend, girlfriend," earlier "child's bonnet," and before that "nun's headdress" (14c.), from Middle Dutch beggaert, ultimately the same word.


Thanks Sami, it is amazing the new stuff you can learn from what appears on the surface to be a simple question... Applause Applause

edit - looked for something beguine-related.

I wonder what the religious Lambert le Begue would have thought of people calling a music and dance style after him....Angel Whistle
Ray41
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 3:34:39 AM

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This is the URL for the picture.
It suggests that this is related to headwear worn in 'Norman Times'.
May pay to Google "Norman period costumes".
Just a thought.Think


http://thehoodedhare.com/images/norman_tunic.jpg

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rogermue
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 3:35:36 AM

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Ah, thar was quicker than I with his post. And he has excellent information. Applause

PS Astonishing what wealth of words have come up now. I'm really impressed. I would have said "the thing he is wearing on his head" - but I see I'm a beginner as to words for head dresses.

By the way, thar, how come you have such good information about historical things?

thar
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 4:56:25 AM

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rogermue wrote:
Ah, thar was quicker than I with his post. And he has excellent information. Applause

PS Astonishing what wealth of words have come up now. I'm really impressed. I would have said "the thing he is wearing on his head" - but I see I'm a beginner as to words for head dresses.

By the way, thar, how come you have such good information about historical things?



Well, I can't claim information here - I only found the word biggin from it being posted here! My best guess was coif. That was because I had a thing about Mediaeval knights, castles and stories, when I was a kid.
Christine
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 9:46:43 AM

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looks like Amish woman's hat

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rogermue
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 9:57:00 AM

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Excellent, Christine. Applause
Where did I see such a thing? I think it was the portrait of a Venetian Doge who wore a similar headwear
and it looked very elegant.
Perhaps I'll find the picture.


Giovanni Bellini: Portrait of the Doge Leonardo Loredan (1501)

Of course, it's a little bit different.
rogermue
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 10:21:58 AM

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The wealth of different headwear through the ages and in different cultures would fill a book, I think,
and an interesting one at that.


Headwear worn by Venetian ladies in the 13th century
IMcRout
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 10:22:38 AM

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This is what my kids wore when they were babies and it wasn't too cold or windy.
We called it a bonnet. I find it hard to see the difference to a biggin.





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rogermue
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 10:33:33 AM

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Lady at Royal Ascot

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, February 7, 2014 11:30:57 AM

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If I had not read the earlier posts, I would have instantly called it an Andean or Himalayan hood - they have become quite popular these days.

These are advertised currently as Himalayan hats:


The lady in Roger's last post is wearing a sort of fabric coif under her hat (similarly, A knight would wear a coif under his helmet. It covers the forehead and loops under the chin (by my definition!).




Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Amy B Reineri
Posted: Thursday, July 4, 2019 10:02:53 AM

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This is a coif. It was common headgear in the Middle Ages for all genders and all income levels. For the wealthy, it would be lined and covered with fancy materials - embroidered, embellished, jeweled even. For the lower income folks, it covered your hair per the directives of The Church, collected the sweat from your head before it ran down into your eyes and it was washable - keeping any hat you wore over it cleaner. It could be worn on it's own or something else on top. It served as sun protection, durag and toupee. You didn't have to style your hair - just pop one of these on and you were street-ready. It was made of linen or woven fabrics initially and as shown in this depiction. The form has been copied into every material since then - because it's form is THE basic head-covering. It is not a Himalayan hood - his garb in the photo is Medieval and it was called a coif in that context and not knit or crochet. Biggin is another term for it. It was worn much later as part of religious outfits, due to their slow adaptation to contemporary styles and preference for clothing that identifies them clearly, some orders still wear it.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, July 4, 2019 10:30:23 AM

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When worn by a soldier or a knight under a helmet it would be more padded, like a quilt, and known as an Arming Hat.

They would also wear a similar padded jacket known as a gambeson or arming doublet.

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Parpar1836
Posted: Friday, July 5, 2019 12:55:57 PM
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A digression: Drago, what catalogue are those Himalayan has from?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, July 8, 2019 3:25:14 AM

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Parpar1836 wrote:
A digression: Drago, what catalogue are those Himalayan has from?


I just found the picture in Google Image Search.
The image address is http://img.diytrade.com/cdimg/387396/7640317/0/1230747931.jpg - so I guess the catalogue belongs to "DIY Trade".

. . .

Ah! Found it! It is DIY Trade China.

I see from the search that alternate names are "Nepal hat", "Sherpa hat" and "Himalayan hat".

However, "Nepal hat" has other meanings.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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