mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
boondocks Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 32,454
Neurons: 96,540
Location: Inside Farlex computers
boondocks

(noun) A remote and undeveloped area.

Synonyms: backwoods, hinterland

Usage: I have fond memories of my childhood home, but I would never trade city life to go back to the boondocks.
Professor
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 1:00:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/9/2009
Posts: 227
Neurons: 42,404
Location: Mesa, Arizona, United States
Daemon wrote:
boondocks

(noun) A remote and undeveloped area.

backwoods, hinterland

I have fond memories of my childhood home, but I would never trade city life to go back to the boondocks.


There is a song about down in the boondocks or out in the boondocks--a place that is very remote and out of the way. Of the beaten path.
mangezi
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 3:21:07 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/27/2010
Posts: 253
Neurons: 65,799
Location: Stellenbosch, Western Cape, South Africa
Daemon wrote:
boondocks

(noun) A remote and undeveloped area.

backwoods, hinterland

I have fond memories of my childhood home, but I would never trade city life to go back to the boondocks.
...rustic, exactly where my navel was interred long back and deep inside is a sense of belonging to the Boonies, the backwoods, we all want to refer as the boondocks.
IMcRout
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 5:30:09 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/27/2011
Posts: 35,380
Neurons: 563,379
Location: Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
Guto André
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 6:02:43 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 12/24/2013
Posts: 262
Neurons: 25,311
Location: Vila Velha, Espirito Santo, Brazil
This word remembers me horror films, watched in my childhood.
Ray41
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 6:05:52 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/9/2010
Posts: 1,937
Neurons: 45,980
Location: Orange, New South Wales, Australia
For some unknown reason I have always associated the boondocks with the Florida Everglades.Think
Absurdicuss
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 7:43:55 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/8/2013
Posts: 2,884
Neurons: 30,654
Location: Jefferson, South Carolina, United States
people put me down cause that's the side of town I was born in
Vicki Holzknecht
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 7:57:34 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/8/2014
Posts: 257
Neurons: 61,514
Location: Sylva, North Carolina, United States
When I show people where I live, their comment is "wow you live in the boondocks."

CheVegas ☁️ ✈ ☁️
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 9:26:43 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/19/2013
Posts: 470
Neurons: 350,540
Location: Cheboygan, Michigan, United States
I never, EVER, would've guessed this word was derived from Tagolog! Kudos to the Filipinos!

(The fact that it's the word for "mountain" makes it even cooler.)
RuthP
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 9:30:09 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/2/2009
Posts: 5,408
Neurons: 87,618
Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
Except these days it seems as common to say out in the boonies as out in the boondocks. I had no idea this was Tagalog in origin, and I do wonder how it came to be so common in the U.S. Think

OK, seems this is the answer:
Online Etymology Dictionary: boondocks, boonies. I guess war expands language as well as technology and medicine.Eh?
ithink140
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 9:41:45 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/4/2013
Posts: 2,453
Neurons: 17,922
We in the UK use expressions such as 'in the sticks' or 'the back of beyond'
pedro
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 9:50:57 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/21/2009
Posts: 13,057
Neurons: 63,022
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r6g_gUEOzzo

The Boondocks 'Return of the King'
Christine
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 10:36:24 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/3/2009
Posts: 3,917
Neurons: 15,842
IMcRout wrote:


You beat me w/this message lol
capitán
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 4:17:14 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/18/2013
Posts: 495
Neurons: 28,396
Location: San Salvador, San Salvador, El Salvador
Is this common in the states?
I mean, would I sound weird if I said it?
I ask because I have never heard it before, even in informal contexts.
RuthP
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 4:24:30 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/2/2009
Posts: 5,408
Neurons: 87,618
Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
capitán wrote:
Is this common in the states?
I mean, would I sound weird if I said it?
I ask because I have never heard it before, even in informal contexts.

It would sound perfectly normal. This is common.

We also use ithink140's in the sticks or in the back of the beyond. Occasionally, one hears in the hinterland(s).
mangezi
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 5:55:18 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/27/2010
Posts: 253
Neurons: 65,799
Location: Stellenbosch, Western Cape, South Africa
in the bundu or in the boondocks
MTC
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 6:51:38 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/18/2011
Posts: 2,780
Neurons: 8,606


"Yo yo" and "cooties" are also among the English words of Tagalog origin. For a list see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_Tagalog_origin

Just coincidentally, perhaps, the Tagalog word "bundok" meaning "mountain" rhymes with "monadnock," a Native American word meaning "mountain standing alone." Coincidental, that is, unless some linguist can trace a connection.









excaelis
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 8:11:50 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/30/2010
Posts: 10,965
Neurons: 32,652
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
muketah wrote:
in the bundu or in the boondocks



My parents lived in Southern Africa for many years, so I grew up with " in the bundu ". Eerily similar, doncha think ?

[edit] Did anyone look up 'hinterland'?
Santos Fred
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 9:56:05 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 1/15/2014
Posts: 1
Neurons: 13
Location: Manila, Philippines
I believe that word was carried back to America by early groups of soldier who stood in the Philippines late 1800 to early 1900.

Came from the Tagalog root word "bundok" or mountain. The common joke/insult "taga bundok" direct translation, "from the mountain". Connotes as less civilize.
Johnas Mahero
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 11:41:22 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 1/9/2014
Posts: 5
Neurons: 893
Location: Mombasa, Kenya
Now I understand the animation series "Boondoks".
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.