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Suggesting an online etymology dictionary, and asking your opinion about Webster's... Options
Gil
Posted: Friday, March 13, 2009 8:14:28 PM
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Joined: 3/13/2009
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1) "This is a map of the wheel-ruts of modern English. Etymologies are not definitions; they're explanations of what our words meant and how they sounded 600 or 2,000 years ago."

Here >>--> http://www.etymonline.com/

2) What do you all think about my "Webster's New World Dictionary of the American Language", College Edition, 1960?
Abdulaziz
Posted: Saturday, March 14, 2009 2:59:05 AM
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Location: Riyadh Saudi Arabia
Interesting.
nick
Posted: Saturday, March 14, 2009 10:18:45 AM
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etymonline.com appears to have a rather short index, I did not find most of the words I tried, although the entries available were interesting. I find most etymologies in The New Oxford American Dictionary, 2nd ed. (printed version and a very large book!) I think it is available online for a fee.

I don't use Webster's anymore, printed or online -- I find Oxford dictionaries more accurate and done with more love. Their atrocious m-w.com is a part of it, of course.
Wolfie
Posted: Saturday, March 14, 2009 12:23:13 PM
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Location: Norway
This looks like an awesome site, which I believe will be used by myself alot now that I've become aware of it's existence =)
gentle doctor
Posted: Saturday, March 14, 2009 4:53:47 PM
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oh thank you

that's good
aldi09
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2009 2:27:16 AM
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Location: Ireland
nick
I like Meriam-Webster Unabridged Online Dictionary. It's not expensive, I've got two months extra for free. There are many examples of how we should use a word we want to get familiar with in context, broad definitions, etc. Of course I am not limited to this one only.
Gil
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2009 11:43:24 AM
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Joined: 3/13/2009
Posts: 77
Neurons: 313
nick wrote:
etymonline.com appears to have a rather short index, I did not find most of the words I tried, although the entries available were interesting. I find most etymologies in The New Oxford American Dictionary, 2nd ed. (printed version and a very large book!) I think it is available online for a fee.

I don't use Webster's anymore, printed or online -- I find Oxford dictionaries more accurate and done with more love. Their atrocious m-w.com is a part of it, of course.


Thanks for your analysis, Nick. I have no experiences with Oxford dictionaries, will try to find and buy one, liking it. On the other hand, I guess my Webster's, since it's an Old fellow (1960) and a College Edition, devoted to the "American language", gives a nice first approach to the beginners/foreigners - of course, must be complemented, at least due to its 49 years. Think
tfrank
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2009 5:28:49 PM
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Location: Pennsylvania
Cool concept.

I'd love to see a section on folk etymologies - maybe something about how they form and why they are so popular, with a list of the most easily debunked?

You're probably familiar with Michael Quinion's World Wide Words already; I love it when Quinion debunks folk etymology.
kaliedel
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2009 7:53:05 PM
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Location: United States
I tried the site out, looking up the word "window." Pretty cool - the etymology stuff reminds me of linguism. It's a great reminder of how English truly is a mosaic of dozens of different languages.
Atallmond
Posted: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 9:29:11 AM
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Location: United States
I tried the site out. It's definitely an interesting concept.
krmiller
Posted: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 6:19:48 PM
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Location: United States
Oh cool, an etymology dictionary! I am really into etymology (though as an intellectual exercise and conversation topic more than anything else) so I'm sure I'll use this in the future. I miss college a lot; my school had a subscription to the online OED, so as long as I was on the school internet, I could browse it for free. If it weren't so expensive, I'd definitely get a subscription for myself now. I trust it above all other dictionaries. Tolkien himself worked on it!
walirlan
Posted: Saturday, April 26, 2014 9:22:19 AM

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Location: Mayo, Connaught, Ireland
aldi09 wrote:
nick
I like Meriam-Webster Unabridged Online Dictionary. It's not expensive, I've got two months extra for free. There are many examples of how we should use a word we want to get familiar with in context, broad definitions, etc. Of course I am not limited to this one only.


Thanks aldi09. I also use this dictionary and I am very happy with it! Great tool for all who want to improve their English.
The price is very reasonable comparing to Oxford Dictionary.
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