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The music of life would be mute if the chords of memory were snapped asunder. Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, December 16, 2013 12:00:00 AM
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Joined: 3/7/2009
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Location: Inside Farlex computers
The music of life would be mute if the chords of memory were snapped asunder.

Jerome K. Jerome (1859-1927)
MTC
Posted: Monday, December 16, 2013 3:01:53 AM
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Joined: 1/18/2011
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According to modern thought, it is not merely "the music of life," that would be lost when "the chords of memory are snapped," but the Self.

The Self as Memory

Whether perception-based or meaning-based, self-knowledge is represented in the individual�s memory. Accordingly, in addition to viewing the self as a concept or as an image, it is useful to think of the self as one�s memory for oneself (Klein, 2001). This is not an entirely new idea. In his Essay Concerning Human Understanding (1690, Book II, Chapter 27), John Locke famously identified the self with memory. Whereas Descartes had found the self in the immediate conscious experience of thinking ("I think, therefore I am"), Locke found identity in the extension of consciousness backward in time. In Locke�s view, a person�s identity extends to whatever of his or her past he or she can remember. Consequently, past experiences, thoughts, or actions that the person does not remember are not part of his identity. For Locke, identity and selfhood have nothing to do with continuity of the body, or even continuity of mind. Selfhood consists entirely in continuity of memory. A person who remembers nothing of his or her past literally has no identity.

(http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~kihlstrm/SelfIdentityMemory.htm)

Thought provoking, isn't it? To the caretakers of loved ones with advanced Alzheimer's , "The Self as Memory" will be more than an academic exercise.



Bully_rus
Posted: Monday, December 16, 2013 3:41:41 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/26/2013
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Neurons: 402,185
Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
The music may be mute but sounds of the snapped chords (splinters?) may be really painful for musician. Though indeed there's a chance that it's only a dementia.
LMcL
Posted: Monday, December 16, 2013 6:52:43 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/21/2013
Posts: 852
Neurons: 112,727
I hate it when that happens. Now, where did I put that spare guitar string ...
jcbarros
Posted: Monday, December 16, 2013 7:31:59 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/14/2010
Posts: 2,480
Neurons: 16,750
Concerto interrotto.
Verbatim
Posted: Monday, December 16, 2013 10:48:43 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/3/2012
Posts: 2,273
Neurons: 250,575
Daemon wrote:
The music of life would be mute if the chords of memory were snapped asunder.

Jerome K. Jerome (1859-1927)

On Memory, "Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow"
"" I have no wish to remember everything. There are many things in most men's lives that had better be forgotten....
Not that the past should be buried. The music of life would be mute if the chords of memory were snapped asunder. It is but the poisonous weeds, not the flowers, that we should root out from the garden of Mnemosyne. Do you remember Dickens' "Haunted Man"--how he prayed for forgetfulness, and how, when his prayer was answered, he prayed for memory once more? We do not want all the ghosts laid. It is only the haggard, cruel-eyed specters that we flee from. Let the gentle, kindly phantoms haunt us as they will; we are not afraid of them.""

The music of life is the accompaniment of our present, with selective hearing muting the dissonant parts.
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