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The history of human conduct does not warrant that exalted opinion of human virtue which would make it wise in a nation to... Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, December 13, 2013 12:00:00 AM
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The history of human conduct does not warrant that exalted opinion of human virtue which would make it wise in a nation to commit interests of so delicate and momentous a kind, as those which concern its intercourse with the rest of the world, to the sole disposal of a magistrate.

Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804)
Bully_rus
Posted: Friday, December 13, 2013 1:05:25 PM
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Mirror, mirror on the wall... Who's the less corruptible of them all? A magistrate created and circumstanced as would be a President of the United States.
Verbatim
Posted: Friday, December 13, 2013 2:49:21 PM
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Daemon wrote:
The history of human conduct does not warrant that exalted opinion of human virtue which would make it wise in a nation to commit interests of so delicate and momentous a kind, as those which concern its intercourse with the rest of the world, to the sole disposal of a magistrate.

Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804)


The Federalist No. 75 on The Treaty-Making Power of the Executive: http://www.bing.com/search?FORM=IEFM1&q=+The+Federalist%2C++no.+75%2C+p.+477+

"However proper or safe it may be in governments where the executive magistrate is an hereditary monarch, to commit to him the entire power of making treaties, it would be utterly unsafe and improper to intrust that power to an elective magistrate of four years' duration. It has been remarked, upon another occasion, and the remark is unquestionably just, that an hereditary monarch, though often the oppressor of his people, has personally too much stake in the government to be in any material danger of being corrupted by foreign powers. But a man raised from the station of a private citizen to the rank of chief magistrate, possessed of a moderate or slender fortune, and looking forward to a period not very remote when he may probably be obliged to return to the station from which he was taken, might sometimes be under temptations to sacrifice his duty to his interest, which it would require superlative virtue to withstand. An avaricious man might be tempted to betray the interests of the state to the acquisition of wealth. An ambitious man might make his own aggrandizement, by the aid of a foreign power, the price of his treachery to his constituents. The history of human conduct does not warrant that exalted opinion of human virtue which would make it wise in a nation to commit interests of so delicate and momentous a kind, as those which concern its intercourse with the rest of the world, to the sole disposal of a magistrate created and circumstanced as would be a President of the United States."

MTC
Posted: Friday, December 13, 2013 3:39:13 PM
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Why not print out the context without distracting underlining, bold print, italics, etc? Let others decide for themselves what is important instead of hijacking the author's words to make your own points. It's better to keep the editorializing separate.
gmjme3
Posted: Friday, December 13, 2013 6:17:19 PM
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Thank you, MTC, I so agree. Verbatim, those words you quote could be emphasized and thereby twisted to point to opponents of the object of your point(?).
MTC
Posted: Friday, December 13, 2013 6:53:44 PM
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Bully_rus wrote:
Mirror, mirror on the wall... Who's the less corruptible of them all? A magistrate created and circumstanced as would be a President of the United States.


I gather by your somewhat ambiguous statement you intended to praise the Office of the President of the United States. Otherwise, it would appear your criticisms of presidents, magistrates, and democratic rule are better focused at home.

"Belarus: inside Europe's last dictatorship

Belarus is stuck in the Soviet past, under the grip of a brutal regime. But a few dissidents still cling to the small hope that things will improve
"

Guardian article at http://www.theguardian.com/world/2012/oct/07/belarus-inside-europes-last-dictatorship

See also the following articles for more perspective and detail:
NY Times article at http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/17/opinion/belarus-europes-last-dictatorship.html?_r=0
Wikipedia article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Lukashenko

Or, most tellingly, Belarus' own official website:

"Presidential privileges

As head of state, the President of Belarus enjoys full immunity. In addition, the Constitution states that the honour and dignity of the Presidential office should always be protected."

http://www.belarus.by/en/government/president

The President of Belarus and the President of the United States: a study in sharp contrasts between a despot who rules with unlimited power in a dictatorship, and a President who governs with limited powers in a democracy!


Bully_rus
Posted: Saturday, December 14, 2013 6:23:57 AM
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The USA as an ardent crusader of democracy has imposed itself upon whole world according to Snowden's files. In such circumstances choice you offered "mind your own business" - senseless or naive. Furthermore I try to love all Presidents especially with despotic powers at hand otherwise you are in real trouble/danger. Knowing that Americans are so hard to pull out of their shell I really appreciate your efforts. And hope that interest in leftovers of the Evil Empire will be lasting and profitable for our mutual understanding/misunderstanding. Forever yours, Sir.
Verbatim
Posted: Saturday, December 14, 2013 1:24:29 PM
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gmjme3 wrote:
Thank you, MTC, I so agree. Verbatim, those words you quote could be emphasized and thereby twisted to point to opponents of the object of your point(?).


That is a brilliant clarification gmj of the danger of any emphasis: the words of the original author "could be twisted" beyond what was underlined.
Otherwise, my point was to highlight Hamilton's reasoning--regardless of partisanship-- and to bring attention to a beautiful characterization of human virtue
in contrast to a superlative virtue, as Hamilton used to make his point.

By the way, did you not have any comment on the quotation itself? That is why I went to the trouble to provide a context for.
MTC
Posted: Saturday, December 14, 2013 8:45:50 PM
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SOME believe sprinkling CAPS, underlining, and italics around a sentence DETRACTS from the message, but I do NOT. NO, never!


Bully_rus
Posted: Sunday, December 15, 2013 8:02:42 AM
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Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
The spitting image of perfection as always Sir.
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