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There are two things that men should never weary of, goodness and humility; we get none too much of them in this rough world... Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, November 24, 2013 12:00:00 AM
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Joined: 3/7/2009
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Location: Inside Farlex computers
There are two things that men should never weary of, goodness and humility; we get none too much of them in this rough world among cold, proud people.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894)
Bully_rus
Posted: Sunday, November 24, 2013 5:14:38 AM
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Joined: 3/26/2013
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Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
What we need it for? For recharging batteries and for tomorrow's fight in this rough world among the same cold, proud people - suspiciously so similar to us, like carbon copy.
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, November 24, 2013 5:30:26 AM
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Joined: 9/21/2012
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Daemon wrote:
goodness and humility; we get none too much of them in this rough world among cold, proud people.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894)



What an understatement!
Thommy
Posted: Sunday, November 24, 2013 7:43:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/24/2010
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Neurons: 464
Great words from R.L.S. but be careful,
everyone who lives this is endangered
of being exploited from the cold proud people!!!
There has nothing changed between then and now.
Christine
Posted: Sunday, November 24, 2013 8:37:27 AM
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Joined: 4/3/2009
Posts: 3,917
Neurons: 15,842
tells that to my politicians
MTC
Posted: Sunday, November 24, 2013 6:22:51 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/18/2011
Posts: 2,780
Neurons: 8,606

The quotation is from Kidnapped, CHAPTER 16. THE LAD WITH THE SILVER BUTTON: ACROSS MORVEN

We had no sooner come to the door of Mr. Henderland's dwelling, than to my great surprise (for I was now used to the politeness of Highlanders) he burst rudely past me, dashed into the room, caught up a jar and a small horn-spoon, and began ladling snuff into his nose in most excessive quantities. Then he had a hearty fit of sneezing, and looked round upon me with a rather silly smile.

"It's a vow I took," says he. "I took a vow upon me that I wouldnae carry it. Doubtless it's a great privation; but when I think upon the martyrs, not only to the Scottish Covenant but to other points of Christianity, I think shame to mind it."

As soon as we had eaten (and porridge and whey was the best of the good man's diet) he took a grave face and said he had a duty to perform by Mr. Campbell, and that was to inquire into my state of mind towards God. I was inclined to smile at him since the business of the snuff; but he had not spoken long before he brought the tears into my eyes. There are two things that men should never weary of, goodness and humility; we get none too much of them in this rough world among cold, proud people; but Mr. Henderland had their very speech upon his tongue. And though I was a good deal puffed up with my adventures and with having come off, as the saying is, with flying colours; yet he soon had me on my knees beside a simple, poor old man, and both proud and glad to be there.

(http://www.literaturepage.com/read/kidnapped-117.html)

One might naturally think the author of lines which exalt Christian virtues would not unlikely be a Christian himself; however, according to Stevenson's biography on TFD:

In other respects too, Stevenson was moving away from his upbringing. His dress became more Bohemian; he already wore his hair long, but he now took to wearing a velveteen jacket and rarely attended parties in conventional evening dress.[27] Within the limits of a strict allowance, he visited cheap pubs and brothels.[28] More importantly, he had come to reject Christianity and declared himself an atheist.[29] In January 1873 his father came across the constitution of the LJR (Liberty, Justice, Reverence) Club, of which Stevenson and his cousin Bob were members, which began: "Disregard everything our parents have taught us." Questioning his son about his beliefs, he discovered the truth, leading to a long period of dissension with both parents:

Characters in a novel sometimes play out the author's inner conflicts. Perhaps this is a case in point.


Verbatim
Posted: Sunday, November 24, 2013 10:05:43 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/3/2012
Posts: 2,250
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Daemon wrote:
There are two things that men should never weary of, goodness and humility; we get none too much of them in this rough world among cold, proud people.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894)


It is well to remember goodness and humility; we get none too much of them still, over one hundred years later. Apparently life before the end of 19th century was wont to
produce much the same lament as we hear so often nowadays. Some of us see that not extraordinary, rather because of the permanence of such ills as coldness among people,
it is explained away as mundane: it is the way of the world, always has been, always will. There is little solace in that.

While reading over some of Thoreau's "Walden", among many statements reminding of goodness and humility, this passage was strangely coincident:

"The poor man is wont to complain that this is a cold world; and to cold, no less physical than social, we refer directly a great part of our ails."
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