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lap-swimming Options
Khalid Sami
Posted: Thursday, August 15, 2013 11:12:42 PM
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Joined: 5/29/2012
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Hello everybody!


What does "lap-swimming" stand for, please?


Thanks
chuckc4th
Posted: Friday, August 16, 2013 1:12:31 AM
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Location: United States
Lap swimming is in a pool, consistent swimming back and forth, end to end to end, constant and repetitive.
Open swim in a pool is not so structured, water play, water aerobics, etc.
Open water swimming is swimming in lakes and oceans and is generally the more challenging sport in my mind.

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, August 16, 2013 2:26:55 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi!

A 'lap' is one circuit of a racing-track (a kilometre is two laps of a 500-metre track, a mile is four laps of a 440-yard track).

Swimming back and forth in a pool is like running laps around a track.

lap
2.a. One complete round or circuit, especially of a racetrack.
b. One complete length of a straight course, as of a swimming pool.

TFD
kool-wind
Posted: Friday, August 16, 2013 7:08:10 AM
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Location: Le Busseau, Poitou-Charentes, France
The use of 'lap' to mean swimming back and forth in a pool is very AE.

In BE we would usually say swimming lengths. A lap is more commonly a circuit of a course, as DragOn said.
Ray41
Posted: Friday, August 16, 2013 7:53:40 AM

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Location: Orange, New South Wales, Australia
In the land down under we use laps. Only occasionally will you hear lengths, usually used by those not born under the Southern Cross.Whistle
If in a swimming race, if you are too slow and get a lap behind the leader then it is referred to as being lapped.
Whether up and down a pool or doing circuits you are completing laps.
To be a lap behind means that you have been lapped.


lapped
(adj) being one or more laps behind in a race. A lapped car is at least one lap behind the car in first place.


In English, 'lap' has many other meanings.

lap 2 (læp)
— n
1. one circuit of a racecourse or track
2. a stage or part of a journey, race, etc
3. a. an overlapping part or projection
b. the extent of overlap
4. the length of material needed to go around an object
5. a rotating disc coated with fine abrasive for polishing gemstones
6. any device for holding a fine abrasive to polish materials
7. metallurgy a defect in rolled metals caused by the folding of a fin onto the surface
8. a sheet or band of fibres, such as cotton, prepared for further processing
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, August 16, 2013 8:35:21 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,427
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom

However, lap-swimming is very different from lap-dancing. Don't get the two confused.
excaelis
Posted: Friday, August 16, 2013 8:58:58 AM

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Is there some way of combining the two, d'ya think ? ( There'd be conventioneers drowning in their hundreds !)
thar
Posted: Friday, August 16, 2013 9:33:52 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
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Ray41 wrote:
In the land down under we use laps. Only occasionally will you hear lengths, usually used by those not born under the Southern Cross.Whistle
If in a swimming race, if you are too slow and get a lap behind the leader then it is referred to as being lapped.
Whether up and down a pool or doing circuits you are completing laps.
To be a lap behind means that you have been lapped.


lapped
(adj) being one or more laps behind in a race. A lapped car is at least one lap behind the car in first place.


In English, 'lap' has many other meanings.

lap 2 (læp)
— n
1. one circuit of a racecourse or track
2. a stage or part of a journey, race, etc
3. a. an overlapping part or projection
b. the extent of overlap
4. the length of material needed to go around an object
5. a rotating disc coated with fine abrasive for polishing gemstones
6. any device for holding a fine abrasive to polish materials
7. metallurgy a defect in rolled metals caused by the folding of a fin onto the surface
8. a sheet or band of fibres, such as cotton, prepared for further processing


since this seems to be a list from various sources (lapidary polisher?) you have to include where a cat (or a lap dancer) sits, and the amount of milk that can be scooped up in one go by a thirsty animal!
Old English læppa - flap on garment, skirt - gives lap as bodypart; overlap, "coiled up", and hence circuit.
Old English lapian - to lap up, drink
Latin lapis (genitive lapidis) "stone." -lapidarius "stonecutter," gives the stone polisher.
Khalid Sami
Posted: Friday, August 16, 2013 9:02:45 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 1,918
Neurons: 10,602
Thank you very much chuckc4th, Drag0nspeaker, kool-wind, Ray41, excaelis and thar.
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