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Difference between You got me & you have got me ? Options
munziradnan
Posted: Sunday, August 11, 2013 8:15:00 PM
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Difference between You got me & you have got me ?

In what situations and where we should use have with got ?

thanks
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, August 11, 2013 9:28:19 PM

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I am going to give my opinion on these phrases. You should wait until you have other answers.

"Got" is used, sometimes as an incorrect synonym for "have".
In some cases, "got" is used as an added unnecessary word.

"I have got an apple." means "I have an apple". ("got" is totally unnecessary).
("I got an apple" is sometimes incorrectly used to mean "I have an apple.")

"I got an apple." correctly means "I received an apple." - it is very general (it can mean "I bought an apple", "I stole an apple", "I picked an apple from the tree", "I was given an apple for my birthday" or any other means of starting to have an apple).

**************************
If there is some occasion where one would say "You have me.", it might be informally said "You've got me."

For example someone (in a bad mood) may say "I have no friends!" - someone else could answer "You have me!" or "You've got me!"

**************************
Sometimes, "You've got me." is an idiom, which means "You have asked me a question which I cannot answer." or "That problem is too difficult for me."

Some people omit the word "have" and just say "You got me."
Kerry.P
Posted: Monday, August 12, 2013 3:09:39 AM
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Hi DragOn,
Along with many others I heard the phrase "You got me at Hello" in a movie. (I think it was Jerry Maguire, or something like.)

I think this means "You had already won me over at the moment that you said Hello".
Romany
Posted: Monday, August 12, 2013 7:31:26 AM
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I think the phrase "You got me" is actually an idiom. Thus it stands as is, and would not be said "You have got me" - except where that collocation appeared in a completely different sense as in Dragon's example above ("For example someone (in a bad mood) may say "I have no friends!" - someone else could answer "You have me!" or "You've got me!")

As Dragon explains, however, the accepted meaning of the term "You got me." is that someone has asked a question to which you don't know the answer.

As Kerry further explained, the phrase "You got me when/at....." (the phrase followed by a particular time)means you won me over to your side, or I started to like you ..at a particular moment.

"You got me when you first walked into the room."
"You got me at the Station when you said "I'm the late Ms. Smith."

BUT

"On what date did William the Bastard invade England?"
"You got me. I've no idea."
dave freak
Posted: Monday, August 12, 2013 7:50:35 AM
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Sometimes, "You've got me." is an idiom, which means "You have asked me a question which I cannot answer." or "That problem is too difficult for me."
____________________________________________________________________________________________

Yes, Dragon! Some people (including me) add the word 'there' to the very end:

'You've got me there, mate!'

Big thanks goes to Romany, Dragon and Kerry for your fantabulous explanations.
Feeble Dragonfly
Posted: Monday, August 12, 2013 11:05:49 AM
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I've never seen it, but I always thought the Jerry Maguire quote was "You had me at hello". It doesn't sound right to me to use the word 'got' here.

The only similar reference I can think of using 'got' is Sonny and Cher's song, 'I got you babe'. Sadly.

I personally would only really use "You got me" to mean that someone caught me out with a prank/practical joke/April fool, or that they physically cuaght me in a game of tag/hide and seek.
Kerry.P
Posted: Tuesday, August 13, 2013 9:12:16 PM
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You're probably right about the quote FD. I did see the movie, but only the once and thereafter relied on others who referred to it, maybe correctly or maybe not.

You're certainly right about the further use of the "you got me" for games and practical jokes. I would even use it for games involving avatars -eg, when a grandchild's avatar destroys mine in some grizzly game of mayhem.
Jacklynembrey
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2013 3:29:08 AM
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In my point of view 'do you have' is more usual in the America, whereas 'have you got' is more common in great Britain (as well as being severally more and less conventional, as daviesri says).
munziradnan
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2013 12:34:47 PM
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Difference between the two sentences ? which one is more correct ?

1) Thanks for helping out me.

2) Thanks for helping me out.

Also, is there any sense difference or meaning difference between these two sentences?

Thanks in advance for your cooperation
leonAzul
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2013 1:10:37 PM

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munziradnan wrote:
Difference between the two sentences ? which one is more correct ?

1) Thanks for helping out me.

2) Thanks for helping me out.

Also, is there any sense difference or meaning difference between these two sentences?

Thanks in advance for your cooperation


Yes, there is a very big difference in meaning. It has to do with the relative positions of the words.

In sentence 2), the word "out" is clearly expressed as a particle of the phrasal verb "to help out". This makes sense to me.

In sentence 1), the meaning is ambiguous, because the word "out" can also be interpreted as a preposition, which does not make sense at all.
RuthP
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2013 1:16:03 PM

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munziradnan wrote:
Difference between the two sentences ? which one is more correct ?

1) Thanks for helping out me.
This would not be used by a native speaker.

You can say thanks for helping out, which means thanks for giving/being of assistance, but this relates to the situation. You may have been helping me or you may have been helping someone else or you may simply have done a part of the work by yourself and that contributed to the success of whatever was happening.

You may say thanks for helping out at the book fair.


2) Thanks for helping me out.
So, related to the above, if you are assisting me with something you are helping me/helping me out.

The out is allowed, but it is not necessary and would generally not be used in formal language. It may be simpler to avoid it.

Thanks for helping me. = Thanks for helping me out.

Thanks for helping with/at the book fair. = Thanks for helping out with/at the book fair.

Thanks for helping me with/at the book fair. = Thanks for helping me out with/at the book fair. ≈ Thanks for helping me by helping/helping out with/at the book fair.


Also, is there any sense difference or meaning difference between these two sentences?

Thanks in advance for your cooperation
leonAzul
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2013 1:49:17 PM

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Is it time to play?

You Really Got Me
dave freak
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2013 4:26:32 PM
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1) Thanks for helping out me.

Grammatically, it's incorrect. The phrasal verb 'to help <--sb--> out' is both separable [the particle is moveable] and transitive [it has the object].

'Me' here is an object pronoun, which must not be put after the particle 'out', but has to be positioned between the verb and its particle:

"Thank for helping me out."

the verb
the object pronoun
the particle

but: 'Thank you for helping out Tom.', where Tom is a 'normal' object.
early_apex
Posted: Wednesday, August 14, 2013 4:40:31 PM
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In today's culture, outing someone can be traumatic, and it is not clear if the person outed would ever return to thank the outer.

So, "Thank you for helping out me" is a sentence that would probably never be spoken.
munziradnan
Posted: Monday, August 19, 2013 11:45:55 AM
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In a world like this i have got you. Vs. In a world like this i got you.

Which one is correct and why?

thanks in advance
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