mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
bound from? Options
coag
Posted: Saturday, July 6, 2013 6:55:33 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/27/2010
Posts: 1,473
Neurons: 8,047
(CNN) -- A Boeing 777 bound from South Korea crashed Saturday upon landing at
San Francisco International Airport, sending up a huge fireball and spinning
before finally coming to a stop -- having lost its tail and, eventually, much of
its charred roof.

http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/06/us/california-plane-incident/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

Is this use of bound correct?
I know, bound is usually used when something is traveling toward a place (for example: a plane bound for San Francisco).
This is the first time I see 'bound from'.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, July 6, 2013 8:13:44 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,403
Neurons: 227,927
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi Crown Aq!
Very interesting question.

I had never thought about it, but from a British point of view you are right

bound adj
a.(postpositive, often foll by 'for') going or intending to go towards; on the way to a ship bound for Jamaica; homeward bound.
b.(in combination) northbound traffic

Collins English Dictionary

But from the American viewpoint, "bound from" is OK.

bound adj.
Headed or intending to head in a specified direction:

American Heritage
This doesn't mention "toward" or "to" - just 'specified direction'.

leonAzul
Posted: Saturday, July 6, 2013 8:26:01 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,589
Neurons: 31,076
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Drag0nspeaker is spot on; this is very much an Americanism.

In addition to "bound for" and "bound from", there are also the idioms "in-bound" and "out-bound" that mean "towards the center of a city" and "away from a city", respectively.
Ava
Posted: Saturday, July 6, 2013 10:14:00 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 4/17/2011
Posts: 46
Neurons: 157
As a native American English speaker and sometime ESL teacher (CELTA), I feel bound (Check it out - use as in compelled.) to tell you that I would never say "bound from." I would also never say and loathe hearing ". . . graduated high school/college/whatever." It's bound to and graduated from (unless you are the school) in my world and the world of everyone else I know.
leonAzul
Posted: Saturday, July 6, 2013 11:04:17 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,589
Neurons: 31,076
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Ava wrote:
As a native American English speaker and sometime ESL teacher (CELTA), I feel bound (Check it out - use as in compelled.) to tell you that I would never say "bound from." I would also never say and loathe hearing ". . . graduated high school/college/whatever." It's bound to and graduated from (unless you are the school) in my world and the world of everyone else I know.

That might be an east-coast west-coast thang.

As a frequent flyer, "bound from" is in the standard argot (how's that for an oxymoron) of road warriors. Like it or not, the people I rely on to get me from hither to thither use such language meaningfully every day.
Ava
Posted: Sunday, July 7, 2013 1:51:25 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 4/17/2011
Posts: 46
Neurons: 157
Well, ya learn somethin' every day.
leonAzul
Posted: Sunday, July 7, 2013 4:42:18 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,589
Neurons: 31,076
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Ava wrote:
Well, ya learn somethin' every day.

Ain't dat de troof!
Whistle
To be clear, I am not making fun of you, or mocking you. I am acknowledging that I learn something here several times a day. That is one of the reasons I continue to participate here.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, July 7, 2013 5:29:27 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 17,684
Neurons: 57,277
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
While on the subject of airline jargon, I was once on a plane where the American cabin staff announced we would be landing somewhere "momentarily".

Give me quite a turn as I had intended to get off at that destination and if we were only going to land there 'momentarily' there were all my plans dashed!!

(Seriously - after a moment's puzzlement and a quick conflab with my equally puzzled neighbour, we worked it out)
leonAzul
Posted: Sunday, July 7, 2013 6:03:16 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,589
Neurons: 31,076
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Romany wrote:
While on the subject of airline jargon, I was once on a plane where the American cabin staff announced we would be landing somewhere "momentarily".

Give me quite a turn as I had intended to get off at that destination and if we were only going to land there 'momentarily' there were all my plans dashed!!

(Seriously - after a moment's puzzlement and a quick conflab with my equally puzzled neighbour, we worked it out)

I have to admit I also have a laugh at that Americanism.

It makes no more sense as momentlich, momentairement (fut!) or any of the other variants, butt there it is, living language in action.

Really, why can't they say "I don't know exactly when, yet we are getting there as quickly as we can"?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, July 7, 2013 3:27:44 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,403
Neurons: 227,927
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi Romany.

That sounds similar to a South African friend of mine.

He says "shortly" is used in SA to mean 'briefly'.

"The boss wants to see you shortly." means (to him) "The boss wants to see you now for a short time."
Romany
Posted: Sunday, July 7, 2013 4:17:58 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 17,684
Neurons: 57,277
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Drago - has he ever explained the 'now' and 'now now' thing to you as well? A nightmare usage when I first arrived there. (But then it became one I couldn't do without!)
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, July 7, 2013 4:24:02 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,403
Neurons: 227,927
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom

Now, now Romany. That's not fair. You left me with a mystery...
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.