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When occasions present themselves, in which the interests of the people are at variance with their inclinations, it is the... Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, June 30, 2013 12:00:00 AM
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When occasions present themselves, in which the interests of the people are at variance with their inclinations, it is the duty of the persons whom they have appointed to be the guardians of those interests.

Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804)
Bully_rus
Posted: Sunday, June 30, 2013 3:47:13 AM
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Between the interests and inclinations of the peoples? It is a playing field of politics and even religions.
dusty
Posted: Sunday, June 30, 2013 4:17:45 AM

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Courage to choose the right always trumps political genius and the most clever evangelical
MTC
Posted: Sunday, June 30, 2013 7:25:12 AM
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The administrators of TFD misquoted Hamilton by cutting short his complete sentence which is quoted in full below. They probably justified their omission to simplify the sentence thereby making it more readable, or to selectively highlight the part that interested them. But they edited the sentence at the expense of Hamilton's complete thought. The question arises, should we enjoy be patronized by being fed "dumbed down" quotations? Isn't there more than enough dumbing down of the message in the media already? Or should we be willing to swallow whatever the administrators of TFD deem suitable to their estimate of our reading level?

"There are some who would be inclined to regard the servile pliancy of the Executive to a prevailing current, either in the community or in the legislature, as its best recommendation. But such men entertain very crude notions, as well of the purposes for which government was instituted, as of the true means by which the public happiness may be promoted. The republican principle demands that the deliberate sense of the community should govern the conduct of those to whom they intrust the management of their affairs; but it does not require an unqualified complaisance to every sudden breeze of passion, or to every transient impulse which the people may receive from the arts of men, who flatter their prejudices to betray their interests. It is a just observation, that the people commonly intend the PUBLIC GOOD. This often applies to their very errors. But their good sense would despise the adulator who should pretend that they always reason right about the means of promoting it. They know from experience that they sometimes err; and the wonder is that they so seldom err as they do, beset, as they continually are, by the wiles of parasites and sycophants, by the snares of the ambitious, the avaricious, the desperate, by the artifices of men who possess their confidence more than they deserve it, and of those who seek to possess rather than to deserve it. When occasions present themselves, in which the interests of the people are at variance with their inclinations, it is the duty of the persons whom they have appointed to be the guardians of those interests, to withstand the temporary delusion, in order to give them time and opportunity for more cool and sedate reflection. Instances might be cited in which a conduct of this kind has saved the people from very fatal consequences of their own mistakes, and has procured lasting monuments of their gratitude to the men who had courage and magnanimity enough to serve them at the peril of their displeasure.

But however inclined we might be to insist upon an unbounded complaisance in the Executive to the inclinations of the people, we can with no propriety contend for a like complaisance to the humors of the legislature. The latter may sometimes stand in opposition to the former, and at other times the people may be entirely neutral. In either supposition, it is certainly desirable that the Executive should be in a situation to dare to act his own opinion with vigor and decision."

(http://www.constitution.org/fed/federa71.htm)

Hamilton highlights the difference between true leadership and mere demagoguery.




FounDit
Posted: Sunday, June 30, 2013 11:32:03 AM

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Thank you, MTC...Applause Applause Applause

I had hope that you would provide context for this quote, as it seemed to make Hamilton say something out of character for one of the writer's of The Federalist Papers.
Verbatim
Posted: Sunday, June 30, 2013 8:01:31 PM
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Daemon wrote:
When occasions present themselves, in which the interests of the people are at variance with their inclinations, it is the duty of the persons whom they have appointed to be the guardians of those interests. (to withstand the temporary delusion, in order to give them time and opportunity for more cool and sedate reflection.)

Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804)


Very unfortunate omission of the end in Hamilton's sentence, unfortunate perhaps for more than one reason.

The crux of the matter seems to be twofold and inviting of reflection:

1) The "guardians" of the peoples' interests must indeed understand and protect those interests better than the people would, under the circumstances.
2) Inclinations must subordinate to peoples' interests. Their "temporary delusion" must be real and (certifiable?) if withstanding it should be acceptable at all.

Hamilton appears to aim rather at the unacceptability of complaisance in the Executive to the humors ( whims, moods ) of the legislative branch-- in the last sentence
of the expanded excerpt provided by MTC-- when circumstances demand acting with "vigor and decision".
The quotation is from The Federalist No.71, The Duration in Office of the Executive, but the statement went far beyond the idea of a reasonable limit in the length of
tenure which Hamilton addressed so eloquently.




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