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Human feeling is like the mighty rivers that bless the earth: it does not wait for beauty—it flows with resistless force and... Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2013 12:00:00 AM
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Joined: 3/7/2009
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Human feeling is like the mighty rivers that bless the earth: it does not wait for beauty—it flows with resistless force and brings beauty with it.

George Eliot (1819-1880)
corneliusfelix
Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2013 12:54:10 AM
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Joined: 6/19/2013
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Location: India
wow, i never knew george eliot is a pen name of a woman until now!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
MTC
Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2013 6:05:04 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/18/2011
Posts: 2,780
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Ol' man river,
Dat ol' man river
He mus'know sumpin'
But don't say nuthin',
He jes'keeps rollin'
He keeps on rollin' along.
...

Ah, gits weary
An' sick of tryin'
Ah'm tired of livin'
An' skeered of dyin',
But ol' man river,
He jes'keeps rollin' along!

Lyrics from Ol' Man River by Jerome Kern (Showboat--1936)

(www.youtube.com/watch?v=eh9WayN7R-s‎Similar)

GabhSigenod
Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2013 8:11:38 AM

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Location: Mulroog, Connaught, Ireland
Rivers are the plumbing for the earth's surface.
Miriam...
Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2013 9:07:36 AM

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Joined: 12/20/2012
Posts: 1,032
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"Human feeling is like the mighty rivers that bless the earth: it does not wait for beauty—it flows with resistless force and brings beauty with it."

George Eliot (1819-1880)

I think within the context of human emotions, George Eliot's quote is about the human heart which has the capacity to feel love--and gives love--to all that (and to whom) it touches. It does not wait to be loved in order to give love, nor for a condition of "beauty" to exist before but it justifies or is inspired to love, but flows freely, without reservation, bringing life and awakening, with all its beauty, to a person's life.
jcbarros
Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2013 11:12:21 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/14/2010
Posts: 2,425
Neurons: 13,974
...........................
Love is a traveler on the river of no return
Swept on for ever to be lost in the stormy sea
...........................
Gone, gone for ever down the river of no return...

(Oh Marylin!)
Bully_rus
Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2013 2:01:59 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/26/2013
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Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Like the mighty rivers human feeling (emotions???) may not only bless, but also curse the earth and its inhabitants.
Bully_rus
Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2013 2:11:19 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/26/2013
Posts: 3,522
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Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
GabhSigenod wrote:
Rivers are the plumbing for the earth's surface.


Leaking plumbing creates some problem in the Europe.

http://images.bwbx.io/cms/2013-06-12/0612-flood-passau-630x420.jpg
Verbatim
Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2013 2:38:16 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/3/2012
Posts: 2,250
Neurons: 249,307
Daemon wrote:
Human feeling is like the mighty rivers that bless the earth: it does not wait for beauty—it flows with resistless force and brings beauty with it.

George Eliot (1819-1880)


Since the immediate context for the quotation from "Adam Bede" is not easy to find, why not venture to place it in the general context of the novel?

Adam's love for Hetty--whose lack of inner beauty is in sharp contrast with her physical, external one--does not diminish its quality simply
because time over again his love is not deserved.
MTC
Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2013 2:47:36 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/18/2011
Posts: 2,780
Neurons: 8,606
Here's the context from Adam Bede, Book 2, Chapter 17: In Which the Story Pauses a Little:

But bless us, things may be lovable that are not altogether handsome, I hope? I am not at all sure that the majority of the human race have not been ugly, and even among those “lords of their kind,” the British, squat figures, ill–shapen nostrils, and dingy complexions are not startling exceptions. Yet there is a great deal of family love amongst us. I have a friend or two whose class of features is such that the Apollo curl on the summit of their brows would be decidedly trying; yet to my certain knowledge tender hearts have beaten for them, and their miniatures—flattering, but still not lovely—are kissed in secret by motherly lips. I have seen many an excellent matron, who could have never in her best days have been handsome, and yet she had a packet of yellow love–letters in a private drawer, and sweet children showered kisses on her sallow cheeks. And I believe there have been plenty of young heroes, of middle stature and feeble beards, who have felt quite sure they could never love anything more insignificant than a Diana, and yet have found themselves in middle life happily settled with a wife who waddles. Yes! Thank God; human feeling is like the mighty rivers that bless the earth: it does not wait for beauty—it flows with resistless force and brings beauty with it.

http://classiclit.about.com/library/bl-etexts/geliot/bl-geliot-adam-17.htm

The point seems to be that men may marry "a wife who waddles," just as women may marry a frog instead of the prince. But the power of love transmutes ugliness into beauty--at least in lovers' eyes. The author Mary Ann Evans was, though brilliant, undisputedly a very homely woman. Through her fictional characters was she fulfilling a wish to be loved despite her appearance?


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