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Are American movies still the king? Options
TheParser
Posted: Monday, May 6, 2013 6:55:19 AM
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I have read that American movies (as with American pop music) are hugely popular because they are well-financed, well-written, exciting, and -- well -- so American.

Question: Do people in the country where you are living still patronize locally made films? Or have American movies destroyed the local film industry?

(A "certain" large Asian country limits American films to a handful each year -- for commercial and political reasons. Of course, the people there simply watch pirated copies.)


Thank you,


James
Briton
Posted: Monday, May 6, 2013 9:16:29 AM
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Here in the UK we watch American and British film equally. To be frank, in my opinion we make different types of film, so both have their place.

In fact a lot of American films are made here as it is less expensive than making them in the US, using a lot of British actors, and it gives those actors a chance to be seen by a wider audience.

There also seems to be a lot of respect given by Americans to some of our more experienced actors, and they are used in American made films quite extensively.
TL Hobs
Posted: Monday, May 6, 2013 1:12:36 PM
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Briton wrote:
In fact a lot of American films are made here as it is less expensive than making them in the US, using a lot of British actors, and it gives those actors a chance to be seen by a wider audience.


That's because we love to hear them talk with that funny accent. Eh?

Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, May 6, 2013 4:23:24 PM

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Finns have a rich film culture.
So do Swedes, Norwegians, Danes, Russians, Germans, Polish, Iranians...

Did you think they only make movies in USA and India?
excaelis
Posted: Monday, May 6, 2013 4:31:02 PM

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They are well-financed, true.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, May 6, 2013 5:57:29 PM

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TL Hobbs wrote:
Quote:
That's because we love to hear them talk with that funny accent.


TL Hobs
Posted: Monday, May 6, 2013 7:15:06 PM
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I can talk 'cause I speak Arkansaw. You all sound funny to me.

Dancing
Briton
Posted: Monday, May 6, 2013 7:22:52 PM
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Which funny accent? We have lots! Whistle

And why do you speak Arkansaw in Alaska? You mean they actually understand you? Dancing

Tovarish
Posted: Tuesday, May 7, 2013 1:33:35 AM
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Bollywood film production is having something down here at the moment, and in an interview yesterday they said there is an average of 23 million people in theatres a DAY in India, that is the whole population of Australia including babies.

Oh yes! and we Aussies all speak like Paul Hogan (crocodile Dundee)
TheParser
Posted: Tuesday, May 7, 2013 8:16:14 AM
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Thank you, EVERYONE, for your great replies.

Since people (especially the youth) absolutely love anything American (our movies, our pop music, , our universities, our slang, etc.), I just wondered whether or not people were still supporting their local movie industries.

I faintly remember reading somewhere that when push comes to shove, people still basically like to hear their own language in movies. I have heard, however, that film production has decreased in many countries. Are the British and Japanese film industries still so vibrant as before?


James
pedro
Posted: Tuesday, May 7, 2013 8:20:28 AM
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Apart from some of the animations and special effects (and NOT car chases), the only American films worth watching are in black and white ( a great era by the way). I'll maybe make exceptions for some comedies but most films are far too formulaic now. Other countries have entered the arena and get by with less funding and more creativity.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, May 7, 2013 9:55:18 AM

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Iceland is a country with a small population (what elswhere would constitute a largish town), no money, and all young people can understand English. But we still make cracking films in Icelandic (and the America remakes them in English Whistle ). Swedish and Danish films are thriving and selling abroad, as well.


Quote:
Although there had been filmmaking in Iceland since the silent era—our series includes the country’s first two sound features—Icelandic cinema was really “born” in 1978, with the creation of the Icelandic Film Fund. Two years later, Ágúst Guðmundsson’s Land and Sons was released with great success nationally and internationally, making the rounds of the festival circuit. Icelandic film was finally on the cinematic map.

Despite the ever-real presence of a cinematic globalization (read: Hollywood) that threatens to engulf especially the cinemas of small nations, Iceland has more than held its own in the face of considerable overseas competition. Average feature production in the past decade has been 7-8 films per year, for a population of about 320,000; as in other parts of Europe, co-production agreements are often essential. A number of recent Icelandic films—Jar City, Reykjavik Rotterdam (recently remade here as Contraband)—have been enormous hits at home and have opened new markets for Icelandic films across Europe.


I think the age of the Hollywood/Bollwood/Nollywood power is eroding. True, only the massive studios have the money to make blockbusters, and they still make the big money, but the audience is changing. You don't have to go to a cinema any more, or even rent a video - there are so many more ways to access films nowadays, people can pick and choose and don't have to accept what the distributors force on them. And I think people are becoming more aware of 'foreign' films as potentially good, exciting/funny/moving films, whatever their genre, not just 'arty' or 'alternative' cinema.

Heck, Iceland is even teaching other people how to make films Whistle Whistle Whistle

Quote:
CALLING ALL TALENTS! ICELAND WANTS YOU!
The RIFF SUMMER FILM INSTITUTE presents a Fiction Screenwriting and Doc Development Workshop in SKAGAFJORDUR ICELAND May 2013.

The Reykjavík International Film Festival (RIFF) and the Skagafjordur Film Academy will host a five-day Summer Institute in Skagafjordur, Northern Iceland, May 21-25, 2013. Please register by sending a brief application detailing your work and vision and CV to summer@riff.is . The application deadline is March 20th 2013.

The Summer Institute is comprised of seminars and workshops hosted by well known Icelandic and international filmmakers. The Institute is an extension of RIFF Talent Lab, a success story since 2006, where young filmmakers from all over Europe and North America have come to Iceland to connect with seasoned professionals in the film industry as well as other aspiring filmmakers.

The price includes accommodation in Skagafjordur, bus rides to Skagafjordur from Reykjavík and back, and meals during the Summer Institute.

The distinguished Icelandic film director, producer and actor Baltasar Kormákur has been confirmed as a mentor for RIFF's Summer Institute as well as world-renowned Canadian documentary film producer, director, writer and script consultant Peter Wintonick. Up to 30 filmmakers from all over the world will participate in RIFF´s Summer Institute that will be held from May 21st to May 25th 2013.

THE NATURAL SPLENDOUR OF SKAGAFJORDUR

The natural setting of Iceland has inspired a number of diverse filmmakers such as Darren Aronofsky (Black Swan, Requiem for a Dream), Ridley Scott (Alien, Thelma and Louise, Blade Runner) and Alexandr Sokurov (Faust, Russian Ark) to choose Iceland as a shooting location.

Skagafjordur has been the scene of Icelandic films like Fridrik Thor Fridriksson’s Movie Days, Children of Nature and Falcons, Marteinn Thorsson’s Stormland and Benedikt Erlingsson's Hross. A number of commercials have been filmed in Skagafjordur and the fjord has been the location for numerous documentary films. RIFF's Summer Institute capitalizes on the geographical location of Iceland as an island nation midway between Europe and North America, the ideal meeting place for young filmmakers from across the globe.


They did not meantion the Tom Cruise film made in Iceland. Maybe not so respected by their target market of eager young filmmakers Whistle Whistle
uuaschbaer
Posted: Tuesday, May 7, 2013 5:37:58 PM

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thar wrote:
I think the age of the Hollywood/Bollwood/Nollywood power is eroding. True, only the massive studios have the money to make blockbusters, and they still make the big money, but the audience is changing. You don't have to go to a cinema any more, or even rent a video - there are so many more ways to access films nowadays, people can pick and choose and don't have to accept what the distributors force on them. And I think people are becoming more aware of 'foreign' films as potentially good, exciting/funny/moving films, whatever their genre, not just 'arty' or 'alternative' cinema.


Can that be extended to include television series or culture in general, the internet being what it is, do you think? I rather feel as though only a few years back I could approach someone and ask whether he'd seen a particular thing on television whereas now I can't. (Though maybe I'm just not keeping up with what's on recently.)
LostinSC
Posted: Tuesday, May 7, 2013 7:58:14 PM
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uu wrote:


"...whereas now I can't. (Though maybe I'm just not keeping up with what's on recently.)"

I have to agree with the above statement with the caveat that the word 'maybe' is dropped.

Nothing worthwhile has been produced for the American Television viewer in years.



excaelis
Posted: Tuesday, May 7, 2013 9:13:45 PM

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Six Feet Under, Band Of Brothers, The Sopranos...Check out HBO evry now and then. They at least are producing fine shows.
LostinSC
Posted: Tuesday, May 7, 2013 10:49:47 PM
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Ex -

I was expressing my opinion of the "free" media outlets. Not the pay for view cable networks. (Not everyone can afford them.)

HBO, Showtime, TMC, etc., etc, will have the occasional interesting and even riviting series, but they do not withstand the real test of majority favorites that can run in syndication for decades..

Sorry to say, most of American TV sitcoms are 'one joke ponys' and not worth the time or money to light up the screen. The so called, drama series, lost me years ago by their light weight and repetitve banality and todays 'reality shows' are a joke.. Ugh!!

Dancing with the Stars, American Idol, Survivor and a myriad of other 'Entertainment' fluff is stealing the time and minds of my retired cohort friends.

Just sayin'

Losty
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, May 7, 2013 11:21:16 PM

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Oh my god Losty!

Do you mean you are not interested that Billy Black has been voted out of the house in Big Brother?

But how can you LIVE without knowing who won?
Tovarish
Posted: Wednesday, May 8, 2013 3:22:23 AM
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The only reality TV I watch is the cricket.

Mrs Browns Boy's is popular down here.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, May 8, 2013 5:06:05 AM

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I don't know about the vast majority of US TV, or what is free or cable or whatever. But I do think some of the US TV shows I get to see (when in the UK, which is when I watch TV) are brilliant. And TV is so much more respected, you are getting film actors taking on TV roles without any thought of it being a step down - it is not a second class medium any more.
almostfreebird
Posted: Wednesday, May 8, 2013 7:56:41 AM
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My favorite movie:



Old Yeller






[image not available]




excaelis
Posted: Wednesday, May 8, 2013 4:38:58 PM

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thar wrote:
I don't know about the vast majority of US TV, or what is free or cable or whatever. But I do think some of the US TV shows I get to see (when in the UK, which is when I watch TV) are brilliant. And TV is so much more respected, you are getting film actors taking on TV roles without any thought of it being a step down - it is not a second class medium any more.



I think one gets a distorted view with imported shows. Everyone here thinks British T.V. is much better than North American, but then they're only seeing the best.
Tovarish
Posted: Wednesday, May 8, 2013 8:09:58 PM
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Does anyone get any Australian productions?

There has been an 'Underbelly' series of infamous criminals, they are very well produced even if the subjects are dodgey.
Litvinenko
Posted: Wednesday, May 8, 2013 8:33:57 PM
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almostfreebird wrote:



My favorite movie:



Old Yeller






[image not available]






how many favourite movies do you have? Seems a lot. Or am i mixing it up with your favorite music and pictures?
Tovarish
Posted: Thursday, May 9, 2013 4:54:53 AM
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The Great Gatsby was filmed in Australia, also the graphics and musical score.

The movie opens in the US tomorrow starring Leonardo de Caprio, I will have to go and watch when it opens in Australia.

Any way my point is, it really is a global village, even in movie making.
TYSON
Posted: Friday, May 10, 2013 9:40:39 AM
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Tovarish wrote:
Oh yes! and we Aussies all speak like Paul Hogan (crocodile Dundee)



That's a lie and you know it Tov. It's actually only the women who speak like Crocodile Dundee.
pedro
Posted: Friday, May 10, 2013 10:07:20 AM
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This is what they look like in Geordieland apparently

excaelis
Posted: Friday, May 10, 2013 12:14:37 PM

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Tovarish wrote:
Does anyone get any Australian productions?

There has been an 'Underbelly' series of infamous criminals, they are very well produced even if the subjects are dodgey.


We get Sea Patrol and I've lost the name of the other one - it's about an anti-terrorist police unit in Sydney; really good show.
Tovarish
Posted: Friday, May 10, 2013 11:32:22 PM
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You got me Tyson!, I thought I could slip that one past, poor old Hoges, is he still having trouble with the ATO?.

Yes I have watched Sea Patrol, but dont know what the other one would be.

Do watch the Underbelly series if you can get it.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2013 5:27:09 AM

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Nah, Pedro, Geordies look like this:


or like this



[image not available]


but only in the winter, mind. In summer, they wear their cooler, lighter clothes.
excaelis
Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2013 11:15:16 AM

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Got it ! The show's called ' East West 101 ', Tov.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, May 11, 2013 11:36:29 AM

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When I was a kid, we had programs from several countries. The Australian ones were famous (I'm afraid) for the actors sounding like they were unemotionally reading the lines, and often sounding like they spoke perfect Queen's English and were "trying to sound Australian" and occasionally "trying to sound excited".
Skippy the Bush Kangaroo, Ten-town, and others that I don't remember the names of.

However, now I have heard that "Underbelly" is exceptional.

In the cinema, you have Mad Max and Crocodile Dundee - you can't get classier than those!

Seriously though, "A Town Like Alice" was an early good film, and more recently there have been some exceptional ones.

"Walkabout" was a Brit/Aussie collaboration, I think.

"Gallipoli" and "Ned Kelly" were classic, in their way (though I'm not too sure of them being too faithful to history...
\
Tovarish
Posted: Sunday, May 12, 2013 12:18:54 AM
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I get a little tired of Aussies movies being mainly historical.

Some of the early stuff was cringe worthy, "whats that you say Skip" then these little pretend hands, also 'Sylvania Waters' and 'Prisoner'.

'Matrix' was filmed down here too, and who could forget 'Murial's Wedding' and 'Priscilla Queen of the Desert?'

Ned Kelly has people very for and against him as a person, he was a bank robber and a killer of a policeman,

or he was goaded into a life of crime by the establishment, he was hung for his crimes.

The producer who cast Mick Jagger as Ned years ago should have received the same treatment.

'Red Dog' is also a good movie, very 'strine but a true story.
Tovarish
Posted: Sunday, May 12, 2013 12:31:45 AM
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Most of the Australian war movies stick very closely to historical record, they are ABC funded or subscided.

'Beneath Hill 60', and 'Gallippoli' and an old one on Vietnam, 'The Odd Angry Shot', the first is a forgotten battle of WW1, all worth watching.

I have missed 'East West 101', will follow it up Exy.
TYSON
Posted: Sunday, May 12, 2013 8:40:41 AM
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Tovarish wrote:
You got me Tyson!, I thought I could slip that one past, poor old Hoges, is he still having trouble with the ATO?.


Funny you should mention Paul Hogan's trouble with the Australia Tax Office. Just the other day there was an article in the paper that a Swiss bank account of his has just been cleaned out. Looks like the Tax Man finally got the money owed.
almostfreebird
Posted: Sunday, May 12, 2013 8:47:14 AM
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Thanks.

I was wondering what ATO is.


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