mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
Is wheat bad for you? Options
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, February 3, 2013 4:38:05 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2012
Posts: 4,668
Neurons: 22,062
A doctor has a new book out that claims that wheat is bad for us. He claims that if we stop eating wheat products, we will have better health -- not to mention lose tons of weight.

Is there anyone who has read his book or who has studied this matter? For example, there are some breads on the market that claim to be "whole grain breads." We are often told that "whole grain breads" are good for us. Do "whole grain breads" count as "wheat products"? I am totally ignorant on this subject.

I would appreciate any guidance.


James
Christine
Posted: Sunday, February 3, 2013 7:47:12 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/3/2009
Posts: 3,917
Neurons: 15,842
I heard pumpernickel is better. Taste better, too.
Verbatim
Posted: Sunday, February 3, 2013 11:33:56 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/3/2012
Posts: 2,240
Neurons: 248,542
TheParser wrote:
A doctor has a new book out that claims that wheat is bad for us. He claims that if we stop eating wheat products, we will have better health -- not to mention lose tons of weight.

Is there anyone who has read his book or who has studied this matter? For example, there are some breads on the market that claim to be "whole grain breads." We are often told that "whole grain breads" are good for us. Do "whole grain breads" count as "wheat products"? I am totally ignorant on this subject.

I would appreciate any guidance.


James


Here is a link for an article explaining whole grain, whole wheat and white breads in light of possible health issues with bread consumption.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whole_grain
TheParser
Posted: Monday, February 4, 2013 6:01:35 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2012
Posts: 4,668
Neurons: 22,062
Thank you both for your replies. Especial thanks for the link.


James
pedro
Posted: Monday, February 4, 2013 8:24:44 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/21/2009
Posts: 13,057
Neurons: 63,022
I'm wondering whether wheat intolerance has similar roots to dairy intolerance. Here in the UK there will be many with centuries old aquaintance with both. Milk and wheat intolerance is relatively rare here despite it being quite 'chic' for celebrities to profess them. It's all down to enzymes needed to digest, and plenty of time for digestive systems to adapt seemingly.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, February 5, 2013 1:24:13 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 43,146
Neurons: 599,134
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Rye is better than wheat, it tastes better and gives more energy and antioxidants.
But if you can't use other grain, try buckwheat. It's non gluten cereal.
leonAzul
Posted: Tuesday, February 5, 2013 2:13:25 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,589
Neurons: 31,156
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
TheParser wrote:
A doctor has a new book out that claims that wheat is bad for us. He claims that if we stop eating wheat products, we will have better health -- not to mention lose tons of weight.

Is there anyone who has read his book or who has studied this matter? For example, there are some breads on the market that claim to be "whole grain breads." We are often told that "whole grain breads" are good for us. Do "whole grain breads" count as "wheat products"? I am totally ignorant on this subject.

I would appreciate any guidance.

It is true that some people are sensitive to the gluten (proteins) in wheat, and this is labeled "celiac disease," which involves interference with significant parts of the intestines, but that is not universally true at all.

In addition to the other alternatives mentioned above, there are also barley, quinoa, jerusalem artichoke, and maize (American corn), but the last one requires special processing (liming) or serious deficiencies can result if corn is used as the primary source of nutrition.

Potato and cassava are also good alternatives, but these too require special preparation or they can be poisonous and not nutritious.
Geeman
Posted: Tuesday, February 5, 2013 4:56:52 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/2/2009
Posts: 1,787
Neurons: 125,022
Location: Whittier, California, United States
TheParser wrote:
A doctor has a new book out that claims that wheat is bad for us. He claims that if we stop eating wheat products, we will have better health -- not to mention lose tons of weight.

Is there anyone who has read his book or who has studied this matter? For example, there are some breads on the market that claim to be "whole grain breads." We are often told that "whole grain breads" are good for us. Do "whole grain breads" count as "wheat products"? I am totally ignorant on this subject.

I would appreciate any guidance.

You should always be a little doubtful when someone comes out with one of these kinds of dietary pronouncements. Eggs were bad for you. Now they're not. Dairy was bad for you. Now it's not. Margarine was healthy for you. Now it's not.

A lot of the studies such things are based on are not particularly good science. In fact, many of them are junk science.

When it comes to wheat, unless you have a particular health condition, it's fine. People have been eating the stuff for thousands of years. Arguably, the evolution of our gut is going to be selecting FOR things like wheat as grains are such a factor in our diet. The idea that we didn't develop to eat such things in the first place has around the same credibility IMO. We're omnivores... but really not. We're more like particularivores. What we call a "balanced diet" doesn't contain a lot of wood or grass, for example. We don't subsist on plankton, sunlight or molds. However, the things that we can live on exist on that balanced diet because our bodies use them up (with a few exceptions for things like allergies, age and some genetics) perfectly well.

So, in the absence of a particular health issue, you should probably just check out some materials about how to have a balanced diet and go with that.
early_apex
Posted: Tuesday, February 5, 2013 5:11:39 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/20/2009
Posts: 2,281
Neurons: 12,855
Location: Spindletop, Texas, United States
Generally speaking, less processed, more whole grain is healthier, but I make an exception for wheat beer.
RuthP
Posted: Tuesday, February 5, 2013 7:10:15 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/2/2009
Posts: 5,408
Neurons: 87,618
Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
Young children are susceptible to wheat allergy. This is much like any other food allergy, with symptoms which may range from mild to anaphylaxis and shock, which can be deadly. Kids who are allergic to wheat usually suffer from other food allergies as well. Most will outgrow the wheat allergy, and it is rare in adolescents or adults.

People with celiac disease, also known as celiac sprue or gluten-sensitivity enteropathy, are intolerant of gluten (a protein in wheat, rye, and barley) and its associated prolamines. Reaction to these causes an autoimmune response to develop, wherein the body's immune system damages the intestines. Damage eventually causes malabsorption problems, malnutrition, and systemic symptoms primarily related to malnutrition.

In the U.S. and Europe, celiac is diagnosed in about one in three thousand. Actual incidence is thought to be 1% to 3% of the population. Although there are lab tests which can point to celiac disease, actual diagnosis requires intestinal biopsy, which must be done while a patient is still consuming gluten.

A gluten free diet usually cures the symptoms: Pathology reverses. Malabsorption problems reverse. It is necessary to remain on a gluten-free diet, so this is not a cure of the disease, but it means the disease is completely managed. Some people have resistant disease and require steroid management to control autoimmune damage.

Those with celiac disease and must permanently avoid wheat, rye, barley, triticale, spelt, durum, semolina, bulgar, graham, kamut and farina (most of which are names for wheats and wheat products). Gluten often contaminates other grains during milling and it is added to many commercial food products: sauces, spice mixes and dressings usually contain gluten; many frozen, canned, prepared commercial foods contain gluten; all must be avoided, as must medications and vitamins using gluten as a binder.

Gluten free diets may be deficient in iron, riboflavin, calcium, thiamin, fiber, niacin, and folate. Patients frequently consume too much fat in response to a gluten free diet. A physician and a nutritionist should oversee the diet.

It is also proposed there is a non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Most of what is seen on this on the internet is anecdotal rather than evidential, but there are some studies supporting it. Some of the studies I've seen are well done, but small. No one has elucidated or even, to my knowledge, proposed a mechanism of action for this.

There is considerable conjecture: no intestinal damage vs. usual damage, but so minute it's not seen under usual microscopic exam; intestinal permeability changes opposite of those in celiac disease/the same as celiac disease/not changed; not gluten-related, but a different protein; due to changes in the population of intestinal flora, not gluten or wheat; gut flora and gluten related; gut flora and wheat related, but not gluten, related. In short, this is not yet well-defined.

There is no evidence that wheat consumption is a problem for the majority of the population. There is certainly no evidence that, in the absence of overt and continuing intestinal symptoms, removing wheat from one's diet will make one healthier. Even with intestinal symptoms, there are a number of other possible causative agents.

It is highly unlikely that most people who claim to have put themselves on a wheat free diet are actually avoiding all wheat and gluten. Most would need help from a nutritionist to manage complete avoidance.

People who move onto a wheat free diet on their own, however, may well increase consumption of some very healthy foods: beans, fresh fruit, and vegetables in particular. If they avoid wheat in the form of cookies, crackers, and cake as well as bread, pasta (and beer), that will also make for a healthier diet. And, as long as they are not as stringent as a true gluten free diet requires, they probably do not risk the nutrient deficiencies.

There's nothing wrong with a wheat free diet, but there is no evidence it is a magic bullet of health.
Hope2
Posted: Tuesday, February 5, 2013 8:42:11 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/6/2012
Posts: 4,907
Neurons: 16,769
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Hi James,

(I started to write this but became busy. I see that others have answered in the meantime and I am repeating some of it. But I will finish and post anyhow.)

You don't say what kind of doctor, but always check out any doctor's credentials and motivations for writing books. Is she/he a PHD, Alternative Care, MD etc.? As well, he/she should be a body chemistry and nutrition expert. Some have monetary motivations, such as trying to sell a diet. Some are truly 'ahead of their time' and have new ideas that take years for the establishment to accept.

To answer your question - it all depends. If you have Celiac Disease, which is an autoimmune disease where the surface of the small intestine that absorbs nutrients from food is damaged by a substance called gluten, then yes, wheat is bad for you. As are all the grains with gluten in them. Rice does not have gluten in it.

Or if you are allergic or sensitive to proteins in wheat, then it also is not good for you.
People with allergies need to avoid the food completely. People who have food sensitivities usually have delayed reactions so it is hard to know which food(s) is causing the problems. These people can be helped with probiotics of good bacteria and good yeast that stop a leaky gut and improve their immune systems.

If you are diabetic, for sure you do not want to eat white flour. Eating protein every meal or snack is a good idea whether you are diabetic or not as it slows the sugar/starch absorption. I assume you are not diabetic or they would have already counseled you about whole grains and proteins.

But most people do not have those problems.

Books are always being written that wheat is not good, but that spelt and kamut, older kinds of wheat, are better for you. Or that it depends upon your ancestors' diets, or that it depends upon your body type, or even your blood group. There are Paleo or Cave Man Diets and so forth.

But I believe that gluten-free diets are for celiacs, and are not a weight loss panacea. You might lose weight because as well as the grains you remove the sugar and fat that is often put with them. But then you lose fibre and nutrients if you remove grains altogether for no medical reason.

My philosophy is that if you are not celiac and not allergic or sensitive to it, anything in moderation is fine. Diabetics have specialized programs set out for them. Whole grains such as wheat, oats, rye, and barley have a lot of good nutrition in them and they are high in fibre. It is when they are stripped of nutrients and used with fat and sugar to make sweets, that they contribute to obesity.

I am not a doctor and you should always check with your own doctor before removing food groups from your diet. Whole Grains are in government recommendations as a food group.

After you have all the information, then you can make your decision. If you are healthy, feel well, and have optimum energy, why change?

TheParser
Posted: Wednesday, February 6, 2013 6:01:13 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2012
Posts: 4,668
Neurons: 22,062
Thank you all so much for all the time and effort you spent in answering my question.

I have decided that the best policy is moderation. I will not avoid wheat altogether. Just use it in

moderation. In any case, fewer calories will help maintain a healthful weight!
dusty
Posted: Wednesday, February 6, 2013 6:23:47 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/13/2012
Posts: 1,770
Neurons: 5,765
There are newer tests these days that can definitively tell you if you are gluten intolerant. The tests only require the drawing of blood. When a series of immunoglobulin,Gliadin anitbodies, and tissue-transglutaminase for IGG,IGA,& IGE molecules, a doctor can give you a definitive yes or no answer if Wheat is a cause of whatever is ailing you
twinsonic
Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2013 10:51:28 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/18/2009
Posts: 356
Neurons: 1,322
TheParser wrote:
A doctor has a new book out that claims that wheat is bad for us. He claims that if we stop eating wheat products, we will have better health -- not to mention lose tons of weight.

Is there anyone who has read his book or who has studied this matter? For example, there are some breads on the market that claim to be "whole grain breads." We are often told that "whole grain breads" are good for us. Do "whole grain breads" count as "wheat products"? I am totally ignorant on this subject.

I would appreciate any guidance.


James


And doctors have books claiming that fruit is bad for us, as it contains sugar. There are books claiming all grains are bad for us. There was a study last year that reported egg yolks are "nearly as dangerous as smoking cigarettes." What I am saying is, most things are fine in moderation. For most of us, cutting back on processed grain products would help our health, but it isn't as simple as cutting out wheat.

"Whole grain" means that all of the original kernel is still there. 100% of the it, including the bran, the germ, and the endosperm. Whole grains can be wheat. Or, they can be rice, oat, corn, barley, rye, etc.

If you want to avoid wheat, you need to read the label and make sure it is "wheat-free." "Whole grain" is meaningless unless you know what the grain is.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, February 21, 2013 6:18:46 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,574
Neurons: 230,526
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi parser - I see you have already acknowledged the earlier 'posters', but wanted to add my opinion - that's all it is, a somewhat informed opinion.

Yes, there are some people who have a sensitivity to, and are made very ill by, Gluten, which is in wheat (and most grains).

Some people are allergic directly to Wheat, and can eat other grains without problem.

There is also the situation of some who have had oral antibiotics in any volume. These tend to kill off the 'friendly' bacteria in the intestine which keeps fungus-growth under control (everyone has both bacteria and fungi in their stomach and gut, nothing wrong with that).
When the bacteria die off, the fungi go a bit wild, and can cause problems similar to Thrush, but inside the intestine. This fungus thrives on bread.

All these are detectable by the doctor (if he is at all amenable to checking for allergies, and is not just happy to give you a drug "to handle the pain and upset" without handling the illness).

There are specific problems with young children, as RuthP has said.
I have seen the most amazing reactions in kids being tested for allergies - particularly flour/gluten, sugar and artificial sweeteners.
These range from acute "ADHD" to full-blown hysterical screaming, running round the room in terror.
Apparently these sensitivities disappear during the teen-years (though they can get worse for a while before disappearing).

TheParser
Posted: Thursday, February 21, 2013 6:47:06 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2012
Posts: 4,668
Neurons: 22,062
Thank you, all, very much for the added comments.
dia19
Posted: Wednesday, November 5, 2014 4:13:29 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 11/5/2014
Posts: 11
Neurons: 50
Location: New Delhi, NCT, India
Yes you are right sir. Wheat products are weight gainer not weight reducer. The Whole grain bread and Wheat grain breads which are available in the market are not good because they are made by Wheat and Flour. They are not good for Health.
Elvandil
Posted: Friday, December 5, 2014 9:17:17 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/5/2014
Posts: 340
Neurons: 153,179
Location: East Montpelier, Vermont, United States
leonAzul wrote:
TheParser wrote:
A doctor has a new book out that claims that wheat is bad for us. He claims that if we stop eating wheat products, we will have better health -- not to mention lose tons of weight.

Is there anyone who has read his book or who has studied this matter? For example, there are some breads on the market that claim to be "whole grain breads." We are often told that "whole grain breads" are good for us. Do "whole grain breads" count as "wheat products"? I am totally ignorant on this subject.

I would appreciate any guidance.

It is true that some people are sensitive to the gluten (proteins) in wheat, and this is labeled "celiac disease," which involves interference with significant parts of the intestines, but that is not universally true at all.

In addition to the other alternatives mentioned above, there are also barley, quinoa, jerusalem artichoke, and maize (American corn), but the last one requires special processing (liming) or serious deficiencies can result if corn is used as the primary source of nutrition.

Potato and cassava are also good alternatives, but these too require special preparation or they can be poisonous and not nutritious.


In actuality, there has never been a single case of anyone being found allergic or sensitive to gluten itself. All of the calims of gluten sensitivity are really allergies to the wheat plant.
Elvandil
Posted: Friday, December 5, 2014 9:20:02 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/5/2014
Posts: 340
Neurons: 153,179
Location: East Montpelier, Vermont, United States
dia19 wrote:
Yes you are right sir. Wheat products are weight gainer not weight reducer. The Whole grain bread and Wheat grain breads which are available in the market are not good because they are made by Wheat and Flour. They are not good for Health.


Wheat is, and has been for 1000's of years, a major food source for humans. It is healthy and nutritious. Only people with specific allergies to wheat (there is no such thing as an allergy to gluten) need avoid it. Making baseless and woo-woo claims about an important food staple is irresponsible and dishonest.
Allana
Posted: Friday, December 5, 2014 10:11:00 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/14/2014
Posts: 693
Neurons: 621,360
Location: Saint Albans, England, United Kingdom
I'm going to tell you my experience with lactose because I think it may help you.
I have suffered from digestive problems since I was young. Mother's reaction was usually a belt round the ear.
Then, a few years back there was an article in one of our magazines suggesting that my problem could be down to milk, so I cut it out for 3 weeks to see what happened.
The improvement was immediate and amazing. No more walking the floor all night because it was the least painful thing to do. No more dead stops when out shopping because it was suddenly too painful to do anything else.
I was fortunate, I found the main answer to my problem and have avoided milk ever since. I can have butter and cheese as most of the lactose is discarded during manufacture, but I have to be very careful when shopping as milk, lactose and casein (milk sourced protein) are added to all sorts of products, even those that you and I would think unsuitable.

As I said, an amazing and immediate improvement, but just an improvement. I still have the problem, just greatly reduced, so did try excluding wheat. My reaction to most gluten free products was that they were uneatable and that I'd rather keep the problem. It is now a small one that I can live with.
DanPeter
Posted: Thursday, December 18, 2014 4:49:12 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 11/7/2014
Posts: 34
Neurons: 133
I think it's not bad because wheat is one that is especially on a diet
arun.fegade
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2015 11:59:23 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/25/2015
Posts: 115
Neurons: 16,541
"Then, a few years back there was an article in one of our magazines suggesting that my problem could be down to milk, so I cut it out for 3 weeks to see what happened."


Childhood digestive problems waiting to be solved till one grows to read magazines. And the magazines, intelligent enough to suggest that the problem could be down to milk. No doctor could be as intelligent as the magazines.
ellana
Posted: Saturday, October 24, 2015 3:46:16 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/19/2010
Posts: 673
Neurons: 127,363
Location: Roquefort, Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur, France
arun... what kind of comment is that? Which magazine is allana talking about? Many magazines publish anecdotal information that have little if any scientific information let alone validity.

A lot of misinformation on diets and medicines lead to glorified fads. Let's be sensible and realistic! When a digestive problem recurs, then consult a doctor for evaluation.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.