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Fruilian Options
timbuys
Posted: Monday, January 28, 2013 7:14:14 PM
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I understand that the Fruilian language is an old one from Northern Italy. My family immigrated from the Buia/Udine region in the late 1800's. I'm curious if there is any one here that could help with the meaning of my surname Cigainero. I know the Italian meaning is Black Swan. I'm curious if it's the same in Fruili
sarah71
Posted: Wednesday, January 30, 2013 2:49:56 AM

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Location: Turin, Piedmont, Italy
Hi Timbuys,
I'll forward your question to my father-in-law, he's from Friuli too, he was born in Pontebba, about 15 miles from the Italian-Austrian border. I also have relatives living in Remanzacco, just outside Udine, I can ask them too, of course. By the way, you have a wonderful family name, it sounds so melodious!
As I gather from your few words, you still have a strong bond with your Friulian roots, so that's my million-dollar question: do you know how to cook Frico? Drool
pjharvey
Posted: Wednesday, January 30, 2013 5:39:35 AM
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To be sure the Italian translation of black swan is cigno nero, not cigainero. "Cigai" doesn't mean anything in Italian.
Maybe it is a dialect from Friuli?
sarah71
Posted: Wednesday, January 30, 2013 6:05:05 AM

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Location: Turin, Piedmont, Italy
pjharvey wrote:
To be sure the Italian translation of black swan is cigno nero, not cigainero. "Cigai" doesn't mean anything in Italian.
Maybe it is a dialect from Friuli?


I suppose it is exactly what timbuys was talking about.
timbuys
Posted: Wednesday, January 30, 2013 12:21:30 PM
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Thank you both Sarah and PJ for your replies

Because it is such a unique name I am very much interested in the family history. A cousin has researched our history (his father was just a young boy) since they arrived in America, but very little is known of their life in the "Old Country"

Sarah I do like to cook but haven't tried the Frico cuisine, but would love to try. (a good recipe would be helpful)

Again thank you both for your help Applause

sarah71
Posted: Wednesday, January 30, 2013 1:43:00 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/18/2011
Posts: 553
Neurons: 79,449
Location: Turin, Piedmont, Italy
timbuys wrote:
Thank you both Sarah and PJ for your replies

Because it is such a unique name I am very much interested in the family history. A cousin has researched our history (his father was just a young boy) since they arrived in America, but very little is known of their life in the "Old Country"

Sarah I do like to cook but haven't tried the Frico cuisine, but would love to try. (a good recipe would be helpful)

Again thank you both for your help Applause



I know, I know, I'm bouncing from one thread to another, but sometimes I suffer from some hyperactivity :))
Frico is a DELICIOUS Friulian plate made of: potatoes, onions and cheese, quite simple but supertasty! I'm going to translate the original recipe into English, just give some time to do it, in the meanwhile you can gratify your sight with this picture:

frico friulano
timbuys
Posted: Wednesday, January 30, 2013 2:46:11 PM
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Sarah...that does look delicious.

The browser I use has a automatic translator, so I am able to read it in Italian. I might have to look for the type of cheese used in the recipe.

Tim
timbuys
Posted: Wednesday, January 30, 2013 2:47:42 PM
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Joined: 1/26/2013
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and don't worry about the bouncing around from thread to thread....I do the same thing with some games and news articles....and now here :)
sarah71
Posted: Wednesday, January 30, 2013 3:11:18 PM

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Joined: 2/18/2011
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Location: Turin, Piedmont, Italy
timbuys wrote:
Sarah...that does look delicious.

The browser I use has a automatic translator, so I am able to read it in Italian. I might have to look for the type of cheese used in the recipe.

Tim


The recipe requires semi-aged Montasio cheese (four-month aging): Montasio cheese is made with cow's milk and at that aging stage is pretty tasty even though not too hot, so if you don't find it you can use any other cheese with similar origin and characteristics.
Enjoy!
sarah71
Posted: Thursday, January 31, 2013 2:48:52 AM

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Location: Turin, Piedmont, Italy
Hi Tim, my father-in-law looked up in his Friulian-Italian dictionary, he found out that cigai could be translated as "to scream, yell" and nero roughly as "dark sky, dark soul". I know it does not make any sense, but you must consider that most of times immigrants' names were mangled by Immigration clerks; one of my father's uncles, Bernard Mihelic, sailed off to Americas in the Twenties, and once there at the immigration office he was asked his name and surname, they didn't understand it the first time so he repeated it twice and the clerk filed him as Mr. Bernard Bernard....
timbuys
Posted: Thursday, January 31, 2013 11:31:42 AM
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Sarah, check your inbox
mwb
Posted: Sunday, September 1, 2013 7:49:05 AM
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Joined: 9/1/2013
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Location: United States, TX
Tim- I am one of your distant cousins in Texas. My mom is a Cigainero. Her stepdad was one of the brothers who wrote the family history.
As my grandad, he told me stories of the family and its history from my earliest days -I was always the odd child, sitting and listening to the adults rather than playing outside!
Rest assured, as far as my grandfather was concerned, the name does translate to black swan.
Remember that G.B. Cigainero spoke no English - thus the common misspellings of surnames.
I just found this site so excuse the late posting.
sarah71
Posted: Thursday, September 19, 2013 10:51:25 AM

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Location: Turin, Piedmont, Italy
Frico wins!

Guys, I knew that Frico would conquer the whole world....
timbuys
Posted: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 10:40:36 AM
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Joined: 1/26/2013
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Neurons: 135
mwb wrote:
Tim- I am one of your distant cousins in Texas. My mom is a Cigainero. Her stepdad was one of the brothers who wrote the family history.
As my grandad, he told me stories of the family and its history from my earliest days -I was always the odd child, sitting and listening to the adults rather than playing outside!
Rest assured, as far as my grandfather was concerned, the name does translate to black swan.
Remember that G.B. Cigainero spoke no English - thus the common misspellings of surnames.
I just found this site so excuse the late posting.


Hi mwb
I'm familiar with the book Floyd and Robbie researched and wrote. I'm a close blood relative to them. (their mother was my grand mothers sister) But in response to the "Black Swan" reference Yes in Italian it does translate, but I'm asking if it has a different meaning in the Fruili language since it is very different from Italian. Come look me up on FB we can talk more
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