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What are you reading? Options
sarah71
Posted: Tuesday, March 12, 2013 11:04:41 AM

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Location: Turin, Piedmont, Italy
I've just finished the new Alicia Gimenez-Bartlett crime novel "Nadie quieres saber" (I actually read it in Italian - no Spanish speaking but Hola, Buenas tardes, Donde esta la playa?, Encantada); nothing new under the sun, but a very nice main character, Catalan Police Inspector Petra Delicado and her faithful and funny assistant Fermìn Garzon. Nice page-turner.
I'm currently waiting for a couple of Philip K. Dick's novels I ordered on-line yesterday: "Flow your tears, Policeman said" and "The three stigmata of Palmer Eldritch", I'm especially curious about the first one: the plot seems quite intriguing, I'd really appreciate other readers' opinion.
boneyfriend
Posted: Tuesday, March 12, 2013 7:21:54 PM

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East of Eden by John Steinbeck. I saw the movie with James Dean when I was young and there is so much more to the book than was portrayed in that movie. It covers generations though so I guess it would be too much to make a movie with all of it. I haven't enjoyed a book in a long time as much as I am enjoying this one.
LostinSC
Posted: Tuesday, March 12, 2013 10:22:15 PM
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Here's a shocker:

I recently bought a 1st edition of "Knock on Any Door" by Willard Motley.

I remember my father denying me the opportunity to read it in 1948. (Copyright 1947)

It's not that I was particularly a precocious child, I was 10 years old, nosy and wanted to know why he was so engrossed in the novel.

Of course, I later saw the movie: starring Bogie and John Derek, read the book and promptly forgot the entire episode..

Why, you ask, did you rekindle an interest in a relative obscure novel published 66 years ago..

Answer:

Beats me. I wish I knew for my own self understanding. Brick wall

Daveski
Posted: Monday, April 15, 2013 4:29:52 PM
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OK, many years ago I bought a paperback copy of Cocteau's Les Enfants Terribles (Lehmann translation). I am going to read it eventually. It's on my coffee table now (odd because I don't actually drink coffee). I'm going to read it any day now ... honestly ...

Nobody tell me how it ends OK. Or else!
Listening . . .
Posted: Monday, April 15, 2013 10:52:39 PM
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I just started "The Heart and the Fist" by Eric Greitens. I am intrigued with story and the lessons it promises to share.
AncelliusFalco
Posted: Tuesday, April 16, 2013 4:07:44 AM
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Location: Canada
Daveski wrote:
OK, many years ago I bought a paperback copy of Cocteau's Les Enfants Terribles (Lehmann translation). I am going to read it eventually. It's on my coffee table now (odd because I don't actually drink coffee). I'm going to read it any day now ... honestly ...

Nobody tell me how it ends OK. Or else!



That was first book in French that I ever read without consciously translating. Oddly, I just bought a 1957 edition of ' L'Etranger ' just because it's the exact edition I read at school so many years ago. Currently reading ' Three Men In A Boat '.
Daveski
Posted: Tuesday, April 16, 2013 4:57:32 PM
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AncelliusFalco wrote:
Daveski wrote:
OK, many years ago I bought a paperback copy of Cocteau's Les Enfants Terribles (Lehmann translation). I am going to read it eventually. It's on my coffee table now (odd because I don't actually drink coffee). I'm going to read it any day now ... honestly ...

Nobody tell me how it ends OK. Or else!



That was first book in French that I ever read without consciously translating. Oddly, I just bought a 1957 edition of ' L'Etranger ' just because it's the exact edition I read at school so many years ago. Currently reading ' Three Men In A Boat '.


I've only read L'Etranger in translation. I do like Camus though, I thought The Plague (La Peste) was a good novel. As a whole I like the Existentialists, not too keen on Sartre though.
AncelliusFalco
Posted: Wednesday, April 17, 2013 2:51:34 AM
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Well, that works out well for both of you. L'enfer, c'est les autres indeed. JPS is rather heavy going, I agree. Camus is so much more direct. Just as miserable, but gets to the point rather quicker.
Daveski
Posted: Wednesday, April 17, 2013 3:59:34 AM
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Yeah, there just seems to be 'no exit' from Sartre sometimes. Camus always had his leap of faith, Sartre just leaped. LOL
uuaschbaer
Posted: Friday, May 10, 2013 5:43:05 PM

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Still in War & Peace... I gave up on Money after the first half, I guess I'm just one of those plot persons. Shou ga nai. On the bright side I just read The Loved One by Evelyn Waugh and it was very entertaining. I'm not sure I want to extend that to Brideshead, as the first few pages seem so dreary (you'd think after a whole book on burial rites I'd be more open to that, but no.)
Cass2ie1
Posted: Sunday, November 10, 2013 9:40:38 PM
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Location: Switzerland
A classic... Treasure Island.Difficult to read because I don't have a level exceptional in english.I miss cruelly of vocabulary so...(I speak only french unfortunately...I would like know several tongue.I try to learn a few others language but it take the time)But I'm learning these time Pride and Prejudice and unlike Treasure Island I must tell you that...It is easy.I can same tell very easy to read for me.I comprehend it without problems (In searching all the words I don't know, of course).

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, November 10, 2013 10:50:35 PM

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Hello Cass2ie1!
Bienvenue!

If you understand Pride and Prejudice, you are doing well!

Take care! (Prenez garde!) Treasure Island has many old idioms (locutions idiomatiques vieux/anciens).

**************
I am reading A Blink of the Screen. A collection of short stories by Terry Pratchett.
He wrote the first of them when he was thirteen. All the stories are very clever, and very funny.
Kerry.P
Posted: Monday, November 11, 2013 9:53:45 PM
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Stumbled into reading "Never Let Me Go".

Intruiging read.
Tovarish
Posted: Monday, November 11, 2013 11:20:07 PM
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Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
I am reading 'A question of Death' a small book of short stories from Kerry Greenwood's series of Miss Fishers murder mysteries.

I have read all Greenwoods novels and seen most of the series of Phryne Fisher, so beautifully produced by the ABC and showing on the ABC.

My library has DVD's to loan so have been able to see the episodes that I had missed.
early_apex
Posted: Friday, November 15, 2013 12:11:30 PM
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Location: Spindletop, Texas, United States
I have been reading a series of C.J. Box novels based on the character Joe Pickett, who is a Wyoming Game Warden. I am now reading the 12th book in the series, and each one is compelling and exciting in its own way.

Understandably, a series of mystery/adventure/crime novels based on hunting and fishing in the American West would have a limited audience. However, the stories will draw you in, for various reasons. I have never been to Wyoming, but reading Box's descriptions as he sets the scenes makes me feel as if I have. To me, that is the point of reading as a diversion from everyday life.

Has anyone else heard of or read any of these?
towan52
Posted: Friday, November 15, 2013 2:48:12 PM
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I recently watched the TV program "A History of the Eagles" and followed up by reading Don Felder's autobiography which was well written and provided a different aspect to the band's troubles. Currently reading Graham Nash's biography - great story spoiled by the gratuitous use of expletives.
scarecrow
Posted: Saturday, November 16, 2013 12:03:38 PM

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Shhh I am an amateur historian. My specialty is anything recounting the Nazi regime. I am a constant reader, but nothing of fiction.
excaelis
Posted: Monday, December 2, 2013 11:53:11 PM

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Spammed that. If legit., my apologies. Yoda syntax.
arkat17
Posted: Saturday, January 25, 2014 6:52:17 AM

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I'm currently half finished with my first read through of Jane Eyre, and so far, I have found the book quite interesting. I want to finish up soon so I can watch the 2011 movie to supplement my experience. I also like this book because I'm currently trying to expand my vocabulary, and this book offers an abundance of words I can study.

After I finish Jane Eyre I will finish this Alexander Hamilton biography by Ron Chernow, which is also very interesting. Previously read a few weeks back was an anthropology book, "Last Ape Standing" by Chip Walter, which was phenomenal in my opinion. Last but not least is on my list to start in a few weeks is a History of India.
rogermue
Posted: Saturday, January 25, 2014 1:28:02 PM

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William Gibson, Idoru, 1996

Science fiction, virtually reality.
The most boring novel of that kind I've ever read.
I know Neuromancer and liked it.
But Idoru is a total flop.
And the book isn't worth writing another line
about it.
Washington Post Book World praises:
The best novel William Gibson has ever written.

Don't believe it. That's a lie.
The book isn't worth the paper it is written upon.



[image not available]

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, January 25, 2014 6:24:08 PM

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Hi Roger.

That's strange.

I think I remember reading the first few pages of this one, but I don't know if I read any more... d'oh!
fayalso
Posted: Sunday, January 26, 2014 1:23:46 AM

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I'm in the middle of "Shining Girls," by Lauren Beukes. I chose it because I liked her novel "Zoo City" so much, and also because it has time travel in it. I am fascinated with time travel.
Luker4
Posted: Sunday, January 26, 2014 6:52:50 AM

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[excaelis wrote:]
Spammed that. If legit., my apologies. Yoda syntax.


You got me curious about the word "syntax" Whistle

syntax=> In linguistics, syntax (from Ancient Greek σύνταξις "arrangement" from σύν syn, "together", and τάξις táxis, "an ordering") is "the study of the principles and processes by which sentences are constructed in particular languages"
from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syntax

and

Yoda's speech syntax has been analyzed and discussed by academic syntacticians, who found it somewhat inconsistent, but could extrapolate that "Yodic" has object–subject–verb word order

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoda


Whistle

I'm reading Clive Cussler, book "the Spy" Isaac bell serious and I like it
rogermue
Posted: Sunday, January 26, 2014 8:27:52 AM

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Syntax

Latin grammars consist of two main parts. In the first part
the forms of words are talked about, declensions of nouns, adjectives,
pronounds, and conjugation tables of verbs.

The second part is called syntax where it is explained
how sentences are built. The various elements of a sentence and
the various possibilities of joining sentences together.

PS Sorry, this is a bit off topic.

AnnaMaria
Posted: Sunday, January 26, 2014 9:46:52 AM

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Hi everyone,

I've always wondered why men like and choose to read science fiction?! I've tried to read the "best" of it but failed every time. Not that I adore the world we live in, but transferring to a totally unrealistic one where all kinds of strange mystic and unknown creatures wander and do what they do, and events beyond my most vivid imagination happen...this is a real torture for me.

So now I've just finished "The Rice Mother" by Rani Manika (not in English though) and started Elif Shafak's "The Bastard of Istanbul".
rogermue
Posted: Sunday, January 26, 2014 10:21:41 AM

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Good question, Anna Maria. Why do men like to read science fiction?
And why are most women not attracted by this kind of literature.
But, of course, there are exceptions. I know a woman who is an absolute fan of SF.

Perhaps we should ask the psychologists. For me it is a genre of fantasy as other genres of fantasy, too. I can only say I am fascinated by SF/fantasy novels of Marion Zimmer Bradley, the Darkover series, and a lot of other SF novels such as Otherworld by Tad Williams (virtual reality). I admit there is a lot of garbage in this genre. But there are top novels too.
Have a look at the thread Best Science Fiction book ever (in Literature).

It may be in the nature of women that they are not so much attracted by SF. Women are more concerned with relationships between persons and not so much with sectors where men have to meet and fight dangerous forces. Well, that's my simple guess.


Luker4
Posted: Sunday, January 26, 2014 12:13:56 PM

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to Each his or her own I guess :)

Absurdicuss
Posted: Sunday, January 26, 2014 9:11:40 PM
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I am currently engrossed in Zenith 2016 by Tom Horn. It is a fascinating look at Free Masonry's inner doctrines, Sir Francis Bacon's status as a high ranking mystic, his vision of a New Atlantis and America's founder's drive to bring that about.
omicrom
Posted: Monday, January 27, 2014 12:54:59 PM

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AnnaMaria wrote:
Hi everyone,

I've always wondered why men like and choose to read science fiction?! I've tried to read the "best" of it but failed every time. Not that I adore the world we live in, but transferring to a totally unrealistic one where all kinds of strange mystic and unknown creatures wander and do what they do, and events beyond my most vivid imagination happen...this is a real torture for me.

So now I've just finished "The Rice Mother" by Rani Manika (not in English though) and started Elif Shafak's "The Bastard of Istanbul".


Hi all,

I'm a woman and I enjoy science fiction like many other genres. I think that's only a common place
In fact, poetry is the only genre I do not enjoy much, and poetry is supposed to be liked for all women, another cliche.
I tried hard but have not been succesful. For me it's boring to the bone.

This is not the place but "boring to the bone", it came to my mind while writting, is it correct?
I'm starting a new vocabulary topic to discuss it

rogermue
Posted: Tuesday, January 28, 2014 12:01:51 AM

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Ah, an "outing".
Thanks for your statement, omicrom. Now we know there are
women who like science fiction. Applause
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, January 28, 2014 1:14:32 AM

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Science Fiction writers (off the top of my head - ones I remember enjoying the books of).

Ursula K. Le Guin (who introduced me to dragon-speaking!)
Mary Shelley
Andre (Alice) Norton (my favourite write when I was a teen)
Robin Hobb
Zenna Henderson
Marion Zimmer Bradley (my wife's favourite)
Tanith Lee
Rosemary Sutcliff
Anne McCaffrey
Margaret Weis
Judith Merril
Mercedes Lackey
Naomi Mitchison
Joan D. Vinge

I think that the concept that "Science Fiction is not about characters, but about machines and space-battles" has not really been true for over fifty years (though a good bit of "space opera" is fun at times!).

Andre Norton's "Beast Master" was (is) a classic of characterisation, depiction of the Navajo traditions and exploration of the relationships of the 'hero' and his team (a puma, eagle and a couple of meercats).

Zenna Henderson's "The People" novels and shorts are superb.
The fact that these people are not exactly human doesn't detract from the humour and pathos of the stories of their life in the rural USA of the 1950s.

Now Clive Cussler - as Luker mentioned - he does write about boats, ships, guns, fantastic machines and so on. The occasional human 'larger than life' character appears occasionally to move the ships, get himself into danger, and shoot all the guns.
I think there are four basic stories in the hundreds of "Dirk Pitt", "Isaac Bell" and "Oregon" books. He just changes the location, exact danger and some of the weapons used.
Great fun and exciting to read, even so!
early_apex
Posted: Tuesday, January 28, 2014 9:49:59 AM
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rogermue wrote:


It may be in the nature of women that they are not so much attracted by SF. Women are more concerned with relationships between persons and not so much with sectors where men have to meet and fight dangerous forces. Well, that's my simple guess.


Roger, I think that is exactly it. My sister really enjoys science fiction, but she is not a typical female, in terms of being relationship-oriented.

I have always enjoyed science fiction, but grow weary of explaining to females why it is worthwhile reading. While science fiction may be viewed as escapism and fantasy, it is really a great way to inspect social and political issues in an unfamiliar setting. This way things can be seen in a new and different light. Also, as with Jonathon Swift, it allows the author to say things he might otherwise be unable to say.
rogermue
Posted: Tuesday, January 28, 2014 12:57:43 PM

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Actually, I can't speak for or about women. That's a subject
where I am no specialist. I think it's for women to explain
this matter.

Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, January 28, 2014 3:36:19 PM

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Try Ursula K Le Guin's The Dispossessed.
whoopi88
Posted: Wednesday, January 29, 2014 12:05:23 AM

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Location: Manila, National Capital Region, Philippines
I'm now reading "The Silmarillion" by J.R.R. Tolkien. I also dreamt about elves last night. Anxious
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