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what is the difference between Options
Rysia959
Posted: Monday, August 24, 2009 8:30:54 PM
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Joined: 8/22/2009
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Location: Poland
Hi,
I'm interested in the difference between "instructions" and "manual" from technical point of view. is there any?

thanks in advance:)

Christine
Posted: Monday, August 24, 2009 8:54:10 PM
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The manual is a little pamphlet. In this manual is the instructions.Instructions are detailed directions on procedure.
TB
Posted: Monday, August 24, 2009 9:42:41 PM
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Christine is correct. A manual (as a noun) is a pamphlet or booklet; instructions are the words written in the manual.

I see you are a student in Poland and, if you are an English language student, it is important to know that the word "manual" may also be an adjective meaning something "Done by, used by, or operated with the hands". See below:


man·u·al (mny-l)
adjective
1.
a. Of or relating to the hands: manual skill.
b. Done by, used by, or operated with the hands.
c. Employing human rather than mechanical energy: manual labor.
2. Of, relating to, or resembling a small reference book.
noun
1. A small reference book, especially one giving instructions.
2. Music A keyboard, as of an organ or harpsichord, played with the hands.
3. A machine operated by hand.
4. Prescribed movements in the handling of a weapon, especially a rifle: the manual of arms.

Example of both:
Rysia959 operated a manual tool while reading the manual of instructions.
Momsey
Posted: Tuesday, August 25, 2009 1:18:25 AM
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I think another difference is that a manual is usually writte instructions, whereas instructions could be either written or spoken. I don't know if this is very technical, but I think it is quite an important difference.
TYSON
Posted: Tuesday, August 25, 2009 2:57:24 AM
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Or one could say; a manual contains the instructions.
Rysia959
Posted: Wednesday, August 26, 2009 11:46:19 AM
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Joined: 8/22/2009
Posts: 20
Neurons: 60
Location: Poland
thanks.
i know that it's also an adjective. sorry for forgetting the article.
once agian thanks

regards
hamish
Posted: Tuesday, September 8, 2009 1:07:25 PM
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Location: Russian Federation
Hi there, is there a British word for American "potato chips" or they are the same? Cause chips(British English) means french fries in American English...Please help, thank you!
RuthP
Posted: Tuesday, September 8, 2009 1:22:32 PM

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I think it's "crisps" but being from the U.S. I'd appreciate confirmation.
grammargeek
Posted: Tuesday, September 8, 2009 5:00:44 PM
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RuthP wrote:
I think it's "crisps" but being from the U.S. I'd appreciate confirmation.


I also think that what we here in America call potato chips are known as crisps in the U.K. At least that's what I've heard them called on reruns of the Brit-com Keeping Up Appearances.
bugdoctor
Posted: Tuesday, September 8, 2009 6:41:51 PM
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grammargeek wrote:
RuthP wrote:
I think it's "crisps" but being from the U.S. I'd appreciate confirmation.


I also think that what we here in America call potato chips are known as crisps in the U.K. At least that's what I've heard them called on reruns of the Brit-com Keeping Up Appearances.


That's what the Geico gecko calls them...........
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, September 8, 2009 8:36:42 PM
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Yes, you are all correct. Crisps is the word. Chips, btw, are not exactly French Fries (if what Maccas and Kentucky serve are typical). Chips are much thicker and bigger and actually recognisably made from potato. The Macca and KFC version used to be called Potato Straws but now are accepted as "chips" - albeit the little brothers of the real thing!
early_apex
Posted: Tuesday, September 8, 2009 8:41:57 PM
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Romany wrote:
Yes, you are all correct. Crisps is the word. Chips, btw, are not exactly French Fries (if what Maccas and Kentucky serve are typical). Chips are much thicker and bigger and actually recognisably made from potato. The Macca and KFC version used to be called Potato Straws but now are accepted as "chips" - albeit the little brothers of the real thing!


Some restaurants in the U.S. serve a version they call "steak fries", which are thicker and wider than the McDonalds version. I suspect these are closer to "chips".
alexia
Posted: Saturday, September 12, 2009 5:07:27 AM
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Joined: 9/12/2009
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Hi,
I was wondering what was the difference between to be capable of and to be able to.
Are they interchangeable?
Could I use eather one of them in a sentence such as: the machine is capable of/able to... ? or would I have to use another verb to express the ability of a machine to do something?

Thanks :)
hamish
Posted: Saturday, September 12, 2009 11:31:44 AM
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Joined: 9/8/2009
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Location: Russian Federation
thanks to everybody, for helping me out!
musicwriter
Posted: Friday, November 13, 2009 1:59:09 PM
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In the instructions there is usually a 'procedure' (how it is supposed to be done step-by-step).
krmiller
Posted: Monday, November 16, 2009 11:36:50 PM
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Joined: 3/17/2009
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Location: United States
alexia wrote:
Hi,
I was wondering what was the difference between to be capable of and to be able to.
Are they interchangeable?
Could I use either one of them in a sentence such as: the machine is capable of/able to... ? or would I have to use another verb to express the ability of a machine to do something?

Thanks :)


They are basically the same, yes. I think I would use "capable of" more for physical things and "able to" for all things, but I can't think of any context in which you could use one but not the other.
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