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MASAKARI: The people's choice 'General Purpose Grade' English wordlist Options
Sanmayce
Posted: Wednesday, November 21, 2012 10:48:01 AM

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Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 405
Neurons: 24,595
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
I am tired of waiting on some group of (make-believe) linguists/logophiles to step up and offer a High-Quality & Huge English list of words.
Personally I am disgusted by the fact that out there are hundreds of universities and specialists, yet, the ordinary people still are unable to make the simplest words-vs-words check, not to mention the hundreds of millions computers in use.
Of course there are contributors worth mentioning, few days ago I found the site of Mr. Chrisomalis who offered a myriad (10,000+) of proofed (and rare) words. If only more such linguists were active and contributing.

So, enter MASAKARI ...

The FREE 'General Purpose Grade' English wordlist bound to offer 1,000,000+ words in next years, hopefully.

Function: A spell-checker type wordlist.
Name: MASAKARI_General-Purpose_Grade_English_Wordlist_r1_311900_words.txt
Revision: 1
Bytes/Lines: 3,823,273/311,900
Shortest/Longest line: 1/31
Type: ASCII encoding, only 'a' to 'z' letters allowed; no dashes, no apostrophes, no nothing except the 26 letters.
Quality: Heavily cross-checked, suitable for general purposes, yet, it is not fully proofed.
Goals: To become the people's choice through its openness, that is, being a starting point in form of Open Project.

Free download, here.

How did I create it?
After multiple-level mish-mash machinations, the base was of course the OWL corpus (powered with 24 wordlists housing 21,082,650 distinct words).
I keep the full log of its creation, if anyone wants to see it I could show it.

As far as I know there is no better FREE English wordlist, no?
My basic desire is this list to grow (in size and quality) with help of those who will use it.

Also MASAKARI stands for command prompt simple spell-checker, it can check your text files/folders (GBs of them are OK) against its (the above-mentioned) wordlist.
The freeware micro-spell-checker is given here.

I have written it to be as simple as possible, that is, to be easily usable.
The main feature of MASAKARI is its ability (or rather affinity, he-he) to handle/hit GBs of incoming texts QUICKLY - on my humble laptop 200MB of pure English text were ossifragantly processed in less than 20 seconds!

Enjoy!

By the way who knows what MASAKARI designates, AFAIK it is a heavy assault Jaguar Clan Mech, I always thought that it has all to do with a monster-machine which does massacre in his path i.e. much more than a mere heavy-ass-kicker but PURIFICATOR/CLEANSER/SWEEPER/ANNIHILATOR/DEVASTATOR due to its powerful weaponry, not sure though.

EDIT:
Ha, just found it, along with being an assault mech it is 'A Japanese battle-axe used by the Yamabushi warrior monks.'
Speaking of Yamabushi a good overview is given here http://www.reference.com/browse/wiki/Yamabushi:
Yamabushi
(Literally: "One who lies/hides in the mountains") are Japanese mountain ascetic hermits with a long tradition as mighty warriors endowed with supernatural powers. They follow the Shugendō doctrine, an integration of mainly esoteric Buddhism of the Shingon sect, Tendai and Shinto elements.
...
Yamabushi began as yamahoshi , isolated clusters (or individuals) of mountain hermits, ascetics, and "holy men", who followed the path of shugendō , a search for spiritual, mystical, or supernatural powers gained through asceticism. This path may or may not have had a founder, as the myths surrounding En no Gyoja are numerous and complex; he is quite similar to a Japanese Merlin in this way. Men who followed this path came to be known by a variety of names, including kenja , kenza , and shugenja. These mountain mystics came to be renowned for their magical abilities and occult knowledge, and were sought out as healers or mediums, known as miko.

...
Yet, having read some pieces from Japanese history, in the past, I do not agree fully with the description above, they were initially Taoistic hermits (China import, he-he) and just then got their Japan-like identity appearing as Shintoistic.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, November 21, 2012 1:57:17 PM

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Joined: 9/21/2009
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What exactly do you do with that kind of list of words?
Does it help you to use this language better?

I made the test presented here earlier, it revealed my vocabulary in English is some 37 000 words. It doesn't help me a bit when trying to understand all the little differences in nuance.
almostfreebird
Posted: Wednesday, November 21, 2012 2:10:12 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/22/2011
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Location: Japan



Masakari (まさかり) is a Japanese word meaning felling-ax:





[image not available]






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Sanmayce
Posted: Wednesday, November 21, 2012 2:21:51 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 405
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Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
>What exactly do you do with that kind of list of words? Does it help you to use this language better?
I want to have all major English words under one roof, in my view not having it is a shame, moreover I see the next step already going to phrases (n-grams), but guess what, the next step cannot be done without having some decent 1-gram (words) list.
Imagine you write/read a letter/essay/book and want to have an appendix/VOCABULARY of it, what other fast way (except MASAKARI) do you know?
In this screenshot I wrote a quick-post off-line and wanted to see whether there were severe errors.

>Masakari (まさかり) is a Japanese word meaning felling-ax.
Thanks almostfreebird.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, November 21, 2012 2:25:46 PM

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Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 44,501
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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
If I want to write a letter to some of my friends I just write it.
I can't see any need to have a list of million words to do that.
Sanmayce
Posted: Wednesday, November 21, 2012 2:38:35 PM

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Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Good for you, but millions nah-nah billions already people (including me) struggle with English language on a hourly basis.
And I am into analysis/statistics of some really big text corpora, I look far beyond my limits/needs - my desire is to deepen my understanding of how words/phrases are [to be] used.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, November 21, 2012 3:02:48 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 44,501
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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Sanmayce,
I can see you can express yourself perfectly well in English.
My Finnish vocabulary is some hundreds of thousands of words, I use some tens of thousands of them in daily basis, even less.
It is said you need some 4000 words to be able to read your daily newspaper, in any language.

You can see in some threads in this forum, how some folks are trying to climb the tree with their arse first,
trying to learn the language by the grammar rules, not by trying to USE the language.

EDIT:

I try to use as simple English here as I can, even though I might know some more complex structures and some more tortuous ways to say it.
Sanmayce
Posted: Thursday, November 22, 2012 2:37:18 PM

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Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 405
Neurons: 24,595
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Speaking of VOCABULARY sizes here some interesting stats in form of sub-wordlists are given:

Minimum vocabulary needed to read all the Agatha Christie's Hercule Poirot stories: 35,136 words familiar to Masakari, here.

Minimum vocabulary needed to read all the Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories: 30,636 words familiar to Masakari, here.

Minimum vocabulary needed to read Sunnah, Hadith and Qur'an: 16,432 words familiar to Masakari, here.

Minimum vocabulary needed to read The Holy Bible: 15,113 words familiar to Masakari, here.
Sanmayce
Posted: Saturday, November 24, 2012 11:56:12 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 405
Neurons: 24,595
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
The first update is done already, the first victims were three major wordlists from phrontistery.info:
- International House of Logorrhea, 15,256 words
- Compendium of Lost Words, 412 words
- Glossaries, 6,141 words

Combined they became a corpus of 16,271 distinct words.
Throwing them to/at/against/on/upon the grabber (Masakari) the familiar/unfamiliar are 12,629/3,642 respectively.
By the way haven't had enough time to find which preposition(s) is/are to be used with 'throw'.

Well one more list I threw on the beast, phobialist.com's 597 phobias:
It is really one thorough job, revision 1 has only 279 of them which prompted to grab the rest 318 unfamiliar words.

In addition, while browsing the unfamiliar OSHO's words I found next ones worthy to enrich the Masakari's wordlist:
deautomatization
deautomatize
deautomatized
dehypnotisation
dehypnotised
delayings
demarked
demarks
demystifications
desirelessly
destructured
destructuring
dirtless
disidentified
disidentifies
disidentifying
disturbedness
divisionless
dualists
dualness
egoless
egolessly
egyptologists
elixirs
elohim
endarken
endarkened
endarkening
endarkenment
evergreenness
existentialness
godlyness
godness
greedlessness
idiotness
idiotocracy
jewelness
jewism
reprogrammers
schmucks
sickmindedness
tensionlessness
transcendentalness
workoholic
workoholics
workoholism

A quick check for what one very popular book ('The Thorn Birds' by Colleen McCullough) can offer:

Strange, the beautiful word 'outcarol' is outwith both SOED and HERITAGE! But MASAKARI shall hit-and-grab it.

An excerpt:
There is a legend about a bird which sings just once in its life, more sweetly than any other creature on the face of the earth.
From the moment it leaves the nest it searches for a thorn tree, and does not rest until it has found one.
Then, singing among the savage branches, it impales itself upon the longest, sharpest spine.
And, dying, it rises above its own agony to outcarol the lark and the nightingale.
One superlative song, existence the price.
But the whole world stills to listen, and God in His heaven smiles.
For the best is only bought at the cost of great pain...
Or so says the legend.


What to say, it hits right in the chest.
An unfamiliar to me phrase, though, 'existence the price' has two nouns, shouldn't it be 'transcending the price' or 'justifies the price', is that so?
TFD Thesaurus holds for 'existence':
...
transcendence - a state of being or existence above and beyond the limits of material experience
...


Next 43 words are assimilated at once:
bums
cacky
clucky
crampy
cretan
crumpets
dabs
dags
fops
goodbyes
hems
hugs
jigs
laceless
leonidas
mrs
ms
nips
outcarol
payloads
pixyish
pommies
poofs
poofter
poofters
pubs
pups
redheads
rosebuds
rums
schisms
singlets
spartans
spleens
swaggie
swaggies
swagmen
swags
tits
tomcats
wagtails
wavelets
yabbies


And finally couldn't resist to add some real-world slangy words from one of my favorite movies - 'Bullet':
fucknuts
lugs
mazel


HERITAGE defines it as:
mazel tov also mazal tov
interj.
Used to express congratulations or best wishes.


mr
pudge
shitless
shitload
wackos


With above add-ons revision 1 has been enriched with 4,033 new words, thus r2 comes strong with total of 315,933 words.
Sanmayce
Posted: Saturday, November 24, 2012 1:16:40 PM

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Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
I wanted to see what NYT paper is made from (what words were in use for a single issue) but unfortunately after saving some 10 articles it denied to give me full text of next ones, what a restricted policy, so bye-bye NYT. Having no time for hide-and-seek games I went to Britain's toppaper (AFAIK):
http://www.guardian.co.uk/theguardian

The Guardian: Main section
Saturday 24 November 2012

So after saving the given articles from its 62 pages (what a number, I don't know whether it has fixed number of pages or what) the familiar words to Masakari r2 are 9,844.

Just after 2-3 minutes of hovering over the 2,377 unfamiliar words (mainly names) a bug appeared in next article:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/nov/23/iceland-recovers-voice-financial-crisis
"... a former powerstation on the outskirts of Reykjavik, which since 2009 has housed a dozen micro-entreprises from underwear designers to electric race car engineers."

I wonder how many new familiar words the next issue will add, I mean if we collect several (why not 365) issues how big the vocabulary would get!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, November 24, 2012 3:21:07 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 35,413
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
A couple of answers:

"One superlative song, existence the price." is poetically "not quite grammatical" (sounds good though!).
Grammatically, it would probably be:
"One superlative song, with existence being the price." (The result of the song is the end of the bird's existence). The sentence still doesn't have a finite verb, though. Ah well. C'est la vie.

The Guardian (used to be the Manchester Guardian, a mouthpiece of the Socialist party, I believe. For some reason, known well by its anagram "The Grauniad") varies in size. It is generally a fairly big paper, but on different days there are different 'sections' besides the general news. one day you may find a 12-page section on 'The Arts', another day a 16-pager on recent medical discoveries, and so on.

I like "enreprise" - obviously some typesetter was suffering from an overdose of French - "l'enrteprise". Pronounced 'ontrəpreeze' in English, of course. Whistle
leonAzul
Posted: Sunday, November 25, 2012 8:45:29 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

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Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Drag0nspeaker wrote:


The Guardian (used to be the Manchester Guardian, a mouthpiece of the Socialist party, I believe. For some reason, known well by its anagram "The Grauniad") varies in size.


Oddly enough, the reason the anagram became so popular is the Guardian's reputation for careless typesetting. Whistle

leonAzul
Posted: Sunday, November 25, 2012 8:57:57 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
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Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Sanmayce wrote:

A quick check for what one very popular book ('The Thorn Birds' by Colleen McCullough) can offer:

Strange, the beautiful word 'outcarol' is outwith both SOED and HERITAGE! But MASAKARI shall hit-and-grab it.

It doesn't need a separate entry. It is synthesized from a colloquial pattern of "out" + [verb] + [noun] and means "to [verb] better than [noun]." In this example, "out-carol" (it is usually hyphenated) means to sing better than the lark and the nightingale.

Sanmayce wrote:

An excerpt:
There is a legend about a bird which sings just once in its life, more sweetly than any other creature on the face of the earth.
From the moment it leaves the nest it searches for a thorn tree, and does not rest until it has found one.
Then, singing among the savage branches, it impales itself upon the longest, sharpest spine.
And, dying, it rises above its own agony to outcarol the lark and the nightingale.
One superlative song, existence the price.
But the whole world stills to listen, and God in His heaven smiles.
For the best is only bought at the cost of great pain...
Or so says the legend.


What to say, it hits right in the chest.
An unfamiliar to me phrase, though, 'existence the price' has two nouns, shouldn't it be 'transcending the price' or 'justifies the price', is that so?
TFD Thesaurus holds for 'existence':
...
transcendence - a state of being or existence above and beyond the limits of material experience
...


This is a poetic way to write: "This is one superlative song, but existence is the price for it."

Sanmayce
Posted: Monday, November 26, 2012 11:30:43 AM

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Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Thanks Drag0nspeaker and leonAzul,
this phrase is a bit tricky (in my view).

>One superlative song, [with] existence [being] the price.
Omitting the verb(s) is cool indeed, but I am swayed by the 'transcends/justifies the price' meaning ever since I watched the dramatic series featuring Rachel Ward (for those who love her do not miss one of my top-favs 'After Dark, My Sweet' where she charms again).

>It doesn't need a separate entry.
This 'out' forming confuses me, I still don't know what path to follow, I often use several such verbs as outspeed/outperform/outgrapple, some people put a hyphen between them some space, for example I am fan of UFC (MMA top league) in their articles they use outgrapple:

'As it turned out, the 36-year-old Clementi (45-21-1) was able to outgrapple Sarnavskiy for the first two rounds, and mostly stay alive for the third to garner a split-decision win to advance to the semifinals of the Bellator tournament at Bellator 77 on Friday night.'
Source: http://www.mmafighting.com/2012/10/19/3528928/ufc-vet-stops-20-0-prospect-from-russia-in-bellator-tourney

'Downes would outgrapple him in rounds two and three to hand Tiequan his first career defeat.'
Source: http://www.mmamania.com/2012/11/5/3606754/ufc-macao-fight-card-jon-tuck-vs-zhang-tiequan-preview

The same goes for 'top' formations: topdog/topgun, I have seen the three variants: top-dog/top-gun and (top dog)/(top gun), yet my choice is to merge them simply because 'underdog' is a diamond word - both as precious meaning and as strong bonding between 'under' and 'dog', I would never use 'under-dog' or 'under dog'. Of course here 'non' variants come confusing me further more, many dictionaries use merged and hyphenated ones, where is the law then?

>This is a poetic way to write: "This is one superlative song, but existence is the price for it."
Agree but more proper maybe is the 'cease of existence' or 'ceasing to exist' since the death is the price.

I was under the (wrong) impression that 'Guardian' was the top[-]newspaper in England, I really want to know which one is the top one, oh and in the USA too.

Oh, and I salute you with a song I have been listening to while writing this Skyfall.

Let the skyfall
When it crumbles
We will stand tall
Face it all together
At skyfall
At skyfall

Skyfall is where we start
A thousand miles and poles apart
Where worlds collide and days are dark

Now, what is 'skyfall' a verb or/and a noun?
leonAzul
Posted: Tuesday, November 27, 2012 3:48:05 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,589
Neurons: 31,166
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Sanmayce wrote:

Oh, and I salute you with a song I have been listening to while writing this Skyfall.

Let the skyfall
When it crumbles
We will stand tall
Face it all together
At skyfall
At skyfall

Skyfall is where we start
A thousand miles and poles apart
Where worlds collide and days are dark

Now, what is 'skyfall' a verb or/and a noun?


It should be written "sky fall," and the word "fall" is used both as a noun and as a verb in this poem. That is part of the word-play involved.

Edited:
Oops, at first I didn't connect this with the title of the recent film. Anxious Brick wall

The spelling is "correct" according to that title, and arguably acceptable according to the way English word formation works, but the word-play goes back to the spelling of it as separate words.

I wouldn't be surprised if that spelling weren't involved in a trademark or copyright claim of some sort. Think




Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, November 27, 2012 11:09:49 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 35,413
Neurons: 244,069
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Personally, I think it 'should' be:
Let the sky fall
When it crumbles
We will stand tall
Face it all together
At skyfall
At skyfall

Skyfall is where we start
A thousand miles and poles apart
Where worlds collide and days are dark


The first line uses fall as the verb and 'the sky' as the subject.
The other lines use 'skyfall' as a noun (it could have a hyphen, but the idea of the sky falling is very old.

Sanmayce
Posted: Wednesday, November 28, 2012 2:05:44 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 405
Neurons: 24,595
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Just found:
shadowonthesun said:
"When SKYFALL was first rumoured as the title, I went a-hunting. And one of the references I found was fiat justita ruat caelum, a legal phrase that means "justice must be done, even if it means the sky falls". If my theory about what "Skyfall" actually is in the film (an off-the-books MI6 operation that ended badly and was covered up), fiat justita ruat caelum could be a fairly powerful motive for the villain."
Source: http://www.mi6community.com/index.php?p=/discussion/1750/what-does-skyfall-mean-in-british-culture/p1

HERITAGE & SOED have these 'out*' verbs:
out-Herod /SOED/
out-take /SOED/
out-throw /SOED/
out-thrust /SOED/
outbalance
outbid
outbid /SOED/
outbreak /SOED/
outbreed
outbreed /SOED/
outburst /SOED/
outcast /SOED/
outclass
outclass /SOED/
outcrop
outcrop /SOED/
outcross
outcross /SOED/
outcry /SOED/
outdate
outdistance
outdo
outdo /SOED/
outdrive /SOED/
outer /SOED/
outface
outface /SOED/
outfence /SOED/
outfield /SOED/
outfit
outfit /SOED/
outflank
outflank /SOED/
outflow
outflow /SOED/
outfox
outgas
outgas /SOED/
outgeneral
outgo
outgo /SOED/
outgrow
outgrow /SOED/
outguess
outgun
outhouse /SOED/
outlast
outlaw
outlaw /SOED/
outlay
outlay /SOED/
outlearn /SOED/
outlet /SOED/
outline
outline /SOED/
outlive
outlive /SOED/
outlook /SOED/
outman
outmaneuver
outmanoeuvre /SOED/
outmatch
outmode
outmode /SOED/
outmuscle
outnumber
outpace
outpace /SOED/
outpass /SOED/
outpeer /SOED/
outperform
outperform /SOED/
outplace
outplace /SOED/
outplay
outplay /SOED/
outpoint
outpoint /SOED/
outpoll
outpour
outpour /SOED/
outpsych /SOED/
output
output /SOED/
outrace
outrage
outrage /SOED/
outrange
outrank
outray /SOED/
outreach
outreach /SOED/
outride
outride /SOED/
outrig /SOED/
outring /SOED/
outrival /SOED/
outrive /SOED/
outroar /SOED/
outroot /SOED/
outrun
outrun /SOED/
outrush /SOED/
outseg /SOED/
outsell
outsell /SOED/
outsend /SOED/
outshine
outshine /SOED/
outshoot
outshoot /SOED/
outshow /SOED/
outskirt /SOED/
outsmart
outsmart /SOED/
outsoar
outsource
outspan /SOED/
outspeak
outspeak /SOED/
outspend
outspread
outspread /SOED/
outspring /SOED/
outstand
outstand /SOED/
outstare
outstart /SOED/
outstay
outstep /SOED/
outstretch
outstretch /SOED/
outstrip
outtalk
outthink
outthrust
outvote
outwait
outwear
outwear /SOED/
outweigh
outwick /SOED/
outwit
outwit /SOED/
outwork
outwork /SOED/


Obviously many many (outshout, outflame, outcut, outglow, outjump, outlaugh, outwalk, outtype, outmarch, outbox, outwrestle, outfly) more such verbs are in use, for instance, OUTSCREAM is a beautiful one, in computer-related contexts SCREAM means operating at startling speed.

Of course past, past participle, and present participle are variants, for example, outdoes/outdoing/outdid/outdone.
The only dashful vs dashless example is: 'out-thrust' vs 'outthrust'.
To avoid overlappings with dashful compound nouns I reckon that all compound verbs ought to be dashless except the next one:

SOED defines it as:
out-Herod, verb trans.
E17.
[from OUT- + Herod a blustering tyrant in miracle plays, representing Herod the ruler of Judaea at the time of Jesus' birth (see HERODIAN).]
Outdo in cruelty, evil, or extravagance. Chiefly in: out-Herod Herod.
Shakespeare, Hamlet: "I would have such a fellow whipp'd for o'erdoing Termagant; it out-herods Herod."

HERITAGE holds these DASHLESS compound 'out*' adverbs/nouns/idioms:
out and away adv.
out box n.
out at the elbows
out at the heel/heels
out from under
out in the cold
out loud adv.
out of it
out of breath
out of character
out of commission
out of date
out of hand
out of humor
out of joint
out of key
out of line
out of luck
off/out of (one's) gourd
off/out of (one's) head
out of phase
out of play
out of/off plumb
out of pocket adv.
out of print
out of season
out of sight
out of sorts
out of square
out of step
out of stock
out of the blocks
out of the blue
out of the loop
out of the question
out of the running
out of the way
out of the woods
out of the woodwork
out of this world
out of turn
out of wedlock
out of whack
out of work
(out) on a limb
out to lunch

HERITAGE holds these DASHFUL compound 'out*' adverbs/verbs/nouns/adjectives:
out-and-out adj.
out-and-outer n.
out-front adj.
out-group n.
out-migrant n.
out-migrate intr.v.
out-of-body adj
out-of-bounds adv.
out-of-court adj.
out-of-date adj.
out-of-door adj.
out-of-doors adv. & n.
out-of-pocket adj.
out-of-state adj.
out-of-stater n.
out-of-the-way adj.
out-of-town adj.
out-of-towner n.
out-process tr.v.

Ha, looking at above entries e.g. 'out of date'/'out-of-date' how clear it would be to have all idioms DASHFUL (or even better TILDEFUL i.e. '~'), thus idiom recognizing would be a cakewalk.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, November 28, 2012 2:09:03 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 44,501
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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
outdated
Sanmayce
Posted: Wednesday, November 28, 2012 2:18:09 PM

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@JJ
Yes 'outdate' is in HERITAGE along with 'outdated', an interesting verb is 'outdating' - it sounds replacively, he-he.

Just found a new *fall movie:
Deadfall (2012)
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1667310/

This one needs investigation as well.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, November 28, 2012 2:28:52 PM

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Have you heard of footfall?
Sanmayce
Posted: Wednesday, November 28, 2012 2:34:14 PM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Have you heard of footfall?


Never, it is surprising how Cambridge & TFD define it differently
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/footfall
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/business-english/footfall

Still don't know how to use it.

Also 'windfall':
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/windfall_1?q=windfall

However Cambridge is silent about: 'Deadfall'.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, November 28, 2012 2:43:24 PM

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The question is,
do you need a hundred thousand vocabulary,
or a bit smaller, you can use?
Sanmayce
Posted: Wednesday, November 28, 2012 2:48:44 PM

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I do, but your 'or' I would replace with 'AND', here 'footfall', 'windfall', 'deadfall' are 3 new words to me which I must first have in my Masakari corpus and then to put in my personal vocabulary, that is, my vocabulary concerns only me - it has secondary priority.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, November 28, 2012 3:33:30 PM

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I still prefer my lesser vocabulary and the capability to communicate.
excaelis
Posted: Thursday, November 29, 2012 2:46:27 AM

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I'm still uncertain as to the purpose and utility of an undefined list of words. Not criticising the idea, just a little perplexed as I don't see how knowing a word exists helps you if you don't know what it means or how to use it.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, November 29, 2012 7:03:39 AM

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Sanmayce - I think you have out-vocabularied the dictionaries, and intend to continue until the sky falls!

(To all others, excuse my use of 'vocabulary' as a verb, I know Sanmayce won't mind!)
RuthP
Posted: Thursday, November 29, 2012 10:12:03 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:

Sanmayce - I think you have out-vocabularied the dictionaries, and intend to continue until the sky falls!

(To all others, excuse my use of 'vocabulary' as a verb, I know Sanmayce won't mind!)

'S OK. My ex used to say English was an adaptable language, so there was no reason he couldn't say he was brooming the floor.
Sanmayce
Posted: Friday, November 30, 2012 12:42:18 PM

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@excaelis
See, years ago our military minister said a piece-of-truth on radio, namely 'There are no bad soldiers, there are bad officers', meaning that the lowest rank cannot be blamed for disorders in the army, those who command and teach are first ones to take responsibility. Here I am visioning the English teachers/linguists and ... programmers. In my case I see that I didn't explain why the chain words-phrases has captured my attention, my goal is to make a smooth traversal (not in my mind but on epaper) starting from 1-grams and going up to 2-3-4-5-6-7-8-grams. For example one application of such wordlist is to proof scanned books off-line, as this short funny Ferengi list, as for 4-grams I phrase-checked (note no word-checked) an article of one top-sinologist:
a_casual_search_of 0,000,002
a_crisis_in_english 0,000,001
a_crisis_is_the 0,000,026
a_critical_stage_in 0,000,064
a_danger_to_society 0,000,085
a_different_character_than 0,000,010
a_figurative_extension_of 0,000,003
a_flat_surface_in 0,000,020
a_fundamental_misunderstanding_about 0,000,002
a_good_chance_for 0,000,260
...

The number on right tells how many times a given phrase was used in other texts, the key thing here is one to be relentless and, mostly, greedy in order to accumulate rich enough corpus.

@Drag0nspeaker
He-he, 'until' no-no, and after that too, I want to see what will happen next, a simple thing as death cannot stop a lively-lovely project as Masakari.
I mind a bit, as you may remember I prefer -ify rather -ize verb-forming, here more suitable in my view are these two:
outvocabularize/outvocabularify and their past participles: outvocabularized/outvocabularified.
Pretty much in spirit of beauty/beautify being verbs, finally my fav is outvocabularify.

@RuthP
I didn't get what you said.
excaelis
Posted: Friday, November 30, 2012 1:41:56 PM

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Hmmm. I'm obviously missing something here. Perhaps it's because I'm not trying to learn this language. I'm also not sure that sticking prefixes or suffixes onto existing words is legitimate as a way of expanding the language in a meaningful way. Would, for example, 'televisionify' ( to make like television ) be absorbed as a word ? I'm really not trying to fight with you, sanmayce, I'm genuinely struggling to understand the application and utility behind this idea that would justify the obvious and committed effort that you have put into it.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, November 30, 2012 2:24:03 PM

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Any language just works and evolves like the speakers do, the speakers create new words every day. Some of the coined words stay, some don't. To be able to communicate in a language other than your native one, you need the basic grammar and basic vocabulary, and the courage to USE that language by discussing (speaking or writing) with other people.

Sanmayce, I raise my hat to your efforts with English words, and, once again, have to say your fluency in English is quite good.
Sanmayce
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2012 12:06:18 PM

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@excaelis
You understand that frivolities like mine (inflectional acrobatics) are reserved mainly for highly-experienced English language specialists, since I am an ESL dummy, take me as wordgrabber.

In other words I am not afraid of going into deep waters, or as the proverb goes 'who scares of bears shouldn't go to the forest', who knows how it really goes?

Let's start with the start:
vocabulary, noun & adjective.

* vocabularian noun (rare) a person who gives much or undue attention to words L19.
* vocabularize verb trans. (rare) provide with a vocabulary M19.
* vocabuler noun (rare) a vocabulary M16–E18.
* vocabulist noun (a) a vocabulary; (b) a compiler of a vocabulary: M16.


One useful distinction here, SOED tells us that vocabularian is a mad vocabulist, hi-hi, it is I.

To me, your 'televisionify' is weak (but plausible) and I can't feel its meaning, televised is in use, yet I am always with open ears for even weirdest neologisms.
As a matter of fact OWL corpus holds 'televisionized'.

televisable adjective able to be televised, suitable for televising L20.
televisionless adjective (rare) M20


We have 'person' and 'personify'/'personalize', for some reason 'personize' is not in use but '[im]personate'.

Let's apply the idea for 'theater/theatre'
Again the adjective is used as base: 'theatrical' becomes 'theatricalize'.

tr.v. theatricalized, theatricalizing, theatricalizes
1. To adapt to performance on the stage; : "All ethnic dance troupes theatricalize the dance of the folk" (Robert J. Pierce).
2. To make a spectacle of; display showily.
theatricalization
theatricalizer


In an old post I used mummy/dummy mummify/dummify analogs, why not mummize, I still don't know.
My personal taste is to use -ify verbs (as intransitive ones) and -ize verbs (as transitive ones) in place of verbs which are both intransitive/transitive (not to mention the nasty overlappings with nouns).

One such verb is 'film' being both tr/intr and noun:

n.
6a. A movie.
v. tr.
2. To make a movie of or based on: film a rocket launch; film a scene from a ballet.
v. intr.
2. To make or shoot scenes for a movie.

In my language exists a pun with a ring: 'Филмиран' like 'filmed' but with two roles (of course):
When one "gets/got filmed" it means that he/she was exposed to too many films/movies and this made him/her kinda living in the filmland (much better than movieland, huh), quite the same as in 'exposed to radiation'.
The prosaic meaning of course is 'to be filmed' or "shot on film".
Now, if my dummy rule is applied we will have 'filmified' and 'filmized' respectively, otherwise the boring 'filmed'.

Let's see what happens with next three:
drama, we have 'dramatize' but not 'dramatical-ize'
opera, not covered althogether
comedy, 'comedize' or for that matter 'comedical-ize'

Strange, we have 'poetize/poeticize' not 'poetrize':
poetize
v. poetized, poetizing, poetizes
v. tr.
To describe or express in poetry or a poetic manner.
v. intr.
To write poetry.

We have also 'poetical' but not 'poetical-ize'.

Got it? The above mentioned 'theatre' yields (via 'theatrical') 'theatricalize' but not (why) 'theatrize', in the same time this 'logic' is not applied to 'dramatical-ize' and 'comedical-ize'!

Since 'vision' is both noun and verb it is no mystery that all -ize, -ify variants are missing, for a reason.
Not so for 'visual' which is both noun and adjective, here visualize is in place, here I want to ask my question again, who/what decides what postfix is (properER/properEST) more/most proper?!

I dumped all SOED's *lify verbs, some of them (transqualify, lovelify, stellify) are music to/for my ears:

* alkalify verb trans. make alkaline M19.
* lovelify verb trans. (rare) make lovely L19.
* amplify, verb.
* Anglify, verb trans. = ANGLICIZE.
* chylify verb trans. convert into chyle M17.
* diabolify, verb trans.
* disqualify, verb trans.
* dullify verb trans. (colloq., now rare) make dull M17.
* exemplify, verb.
* jellify, verb.
* jollify, verb.
* mollify, verb.
* nullify, verb trans.
* oversimplify, verb trans. & intrans.
* preamplify, verb trans.
* prequalify verb intrans. & trans. qualify in advance, esp. in advance of a sporting event L20.
* probabilify, verb trans.
* qualify, verb.
* requalify verb trans. & intrans. qualify again L16.
* salify, verb trans.
* simplify, verb.
* steelify, verb trans.
* stellify, verb trans.
* templify verb trans. (long rare or obsolete) make into or like a temple E17.
* transqualify verb trans. (rare) change in quality M17.
* uglify, verb trans.
* unqualify, verb trans.
* unsimplify verb trans. make less simple; state in a more complex form: M19.
* vilify, verb trans.

Now it is time for 'dis-' [trans]forming:
dis-Anglify
disdiabolify
disdisqualify, he-he double negation has its meaning ... somewhere
disjellify
disnullify
...
Ha looking at 'templify' I couldn't resist not to coin both 'distemplify' and 'dischurchify' (or more proper or properer 'distemplize' and 'dischurchize') something that Ottomans did with many Christian temples.

Sancta Sophia



[image not available]


Even Sanmayce is stunned here, how to call this "conversion", in my view the sultan should have destroyed it COMPLETELY and just then build what he wanted.

Hm, we have 'Hellene' noun and 'Hellenize' verb but lack 'hellize/hellify' verb(s) for 'hell' noun, and 'holify' for 'holy', strange, not having these nifty words poorifies or enpoors/poorizes/pauperizes the vocabulary.

Let's compare the pair rat/ratify, since ratify is firmly established and has nothing to do with rats we are unable to derive meaningful ... derivative, moreover rat is not an adjective. Always there is a slight chance for making someone to be rat-like, but this is a looong shot.

Far more clear and without dependencies is next triad:
human/humanize/humanify

Similarly STUPE (a stupid person, a fool) gives rise to STUPify/stupefy.
Here I do not see any reason not to coin its analog 'STUPIDify', it is more natural because 'stupid' is adjective while 'stupe' not.

Also the adjective 'sturdy' would beget the verb 'sturdify'.

Imagine you have a wall and want to make a door into it, how do you call the process?
I would call it 'doorizing', 'dooring' is already loaded with these:
tr.v. doored, dooring, doors
1. Slang: To strike (a passing bicyclist, for example) by suddenly opening a vehicular door.
2. To serve as a doorman or doorwoman of (a nightclub, for example).


Similarly to:
vaporize
tr. & intr.v. vaporized, vaporizing, vaporizes
To convert or be converted into vapor.

And finally a word needing special attention especially for my American friends:
pimp
n.
One who finds customers for a prostitute; a procurer.
intr.v. pimped, pimping, pimps
To serve as a procurer of prostitutes.


One very popular show on MTV is called 'Pimp My Ride', these guys on MTV have not opened the HERITAGE for sure, but no worry, here I am, giving a helping hand:
'pimpify'/'pimpize', as in:

victimize
tr.v. victimized, victimizing, victimizes

1. To subject to swindle or fraud.
2. To make a victim of.


How desolate! Not to have 'victimified' in one's arsenal.

Enough, guardians-of-purity won't survive more of my sanmaycifyings.

@JJ
I salute you too JJ.
leonAzul
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2012 1:13:22 PM

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almostfreebird
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2012 1:17:31 PM
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I like the cowbellDancing


Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2012 2:28:41 PM

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I like the coined word sanmaycifyings ;-)
Sanmayce
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2012 3:01:26 PM

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Yesterday I saw the poster (in metro) of incoming movie 'THE HOBBIT' featuring the mysteriously looking Galadriel, a full in shades or a shadeful image.



[image not available]


And just realized that no-one knows what kind of creature she really is, that she is not elf-witch (all elfs are magical beings stupid Gimli) as Gimli refers to but ELFESS, is it so hard to see?!



[image not available]


Some info: http://lotr.wikia.com/wiki/Galadriel
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