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When you have really exhausted an experience you always reverence and love it. Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, October 21, 2012 12:00:00 AM
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When you have really exhausted an experience you always reverence and love it.

Gilbert Chesterton (1874-1936)
jcbarros
Posted: Sunday, October 21, 2012 5:44:17 PM

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Not always.
Daveski
Posted: Sunday, October 21, 2012 8:38:06 PM
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I suppose it all depends on the experience.
thar
Posted: Monday, October 22, 2012 5:45:51 AM

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reverence it? seriously, that was (is?) a verb. tfd has it

rev·er·ence (rvr-ns)
n.
1. A feeling of profound awe and respect and often love; veneration. See Synonyms at honor.
2. An act showing respect, especially a bow or curtsy.
3. The state of being revered.
4. Reverence Used as a form of address for certain members of the Christian clergy: Your Reverence.
tr.v. rev·er·enced, rev·er·enc·ing, rev·er·enc·es
To consider or treat with profound awe and respect; venerate.


but I have got to ask if anyone has ever heard or read it anywhere? It seems a bit redundant! You already have venerate or revere, not quite the same thing! Or is it just me it sounds weird to?
MTC
Posted: Monday, October 22, 2012 9:22:16 AM
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Only very rarely do we hear "reverence" used as a verb which is why it sounds strange. Chesterton wanted readers to remember his words which is probably why he employed the rare verb "reverence" instead of commonplace synonyms like "revere" and "venerate." Here is another example of "reverence" used as a verb: "Every one of you shall reverence his mother and his father, and you shall keep My sabbaths; I am the LORD your God."
New American Standard Bible (©1995)

As for being redundant, I can only say English overflows with rich redundancies. Some words like "revere" and "venerate" win the usage beauty contest, while others like the verb "reverence" fade into obscurity.

excaelis
Posted: Monday, October 22, 2012 12:17:22 PM

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For me ' reverence ' has a sniff of humbug about it. The show of devotion rather than the reality.
a1abhishek
Posted: Monday, October 29, 2012 7:39:44 AM
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MTC wrote:
Only very rarely do we hear "reverence" used as a verb which is why it sounds strange. Chesterton wanted readers to remember his words which is probably why he employed the rare verb "reverence" instead of commonplace synonyms like "revere" and "venerate." Here is another example of "reverence" used as a verb: "Every one of you shall reverence his mother and his father, and you shall keep My sabbaths; I am the LORD your God."
New American Standard Bible (©1995)

As for being redundant, I can only say English overflows with rich redundancies. Some words like "revere" and "venerate" win the usage beauty contest, while others like the verb "reverence" fade into obscurity.

yes correct. i m agree with and thank you for sharing it.
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