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Japanese Slang--Chuunibyou Options
englaa
Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2012 12:43:58 AM
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Location: Taiwan
Dear all,
My question seems like a silly question.Brick wall
My classmate asked me what the English expression for the Japanese slang "Chuunibyou" is.
The direct translation of Chuunibyou is "the illness of eighth graders", which means teenagers at that age acting like know-it-all-adults. (Reference:Urban Dictionary--http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Chuunibyou)
To be honest, I haven't heard of this slang until he asked me this question. I am not really sure what its exact meaning is.
Could anyone help me on what English expressions are suitable for this slang?
Thanks a lot for your help.
Tovarish
Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2012 1:19:44 AM
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Welcome to the forum englaa, hope you enjoy posting with us.

There are no silly questions, you could get some silly replies, but it all in good humour.

Hormones, not slang but an explantation.

Ray41
Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2012 1:52:29 AM

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Origin;
Hikaru Ijuin (hikaruijuin@twitter) is said to be the first person to use this word as it was heard in his radio programme Hikaru Ijuin's UP'S (伊集院光のUP'S). During an episode which aired on 11 November 1999, Ijuin mentioned, "I'm still contracting 'chuunibyou' myself". In the following week, Ijuin started a corner called "Am I sick? Oh, it's just Chuunibyou." in which Ijuin reads "cases" contributed by his radio listeners in his radio.


The link below gives a bit more detail on Chuunibyou, but, to me, it is describing the average juvenile/adolescent behaviour/ actions/thoughts of young people when they are about 13 to 15, years of age. It appears to have morphed and so has been used in the title of a series of books(verification needed there) and a TV series. I cannot think of an exact English slang term. Any teenager acting strange/misbehaving, etc. would probably come under the term of 'juvenile delinquent' or 'smart arse'(?)

http://en.dic.pixiv.net/a/Chuunibyou

This is from a blog site(?) so you will have to take it at face value!Think

http://en.dic.pixiv.net/a/Chuunibyou
excaelis
Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2012 4:42:20 AM

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Hire teenagers while they still know everything. We don't really have an idiom that equates.
englaa
Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2012 5:37:06 AM
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Location: Taiwan
Dear all,
Thank you for your explanations and replies. I got the idea.
I guess this word is not popular in English speaking countries.

I always hate when someone asks me to translate a word or a usage into another language, there are usually no usages with the exact meaning in different languages, it just does not "feel right".
(Complaining the English education in Taiwan: Teachers always want us to learn English through Chinese, they think it's a faster way, but in fact it keep us from thinking directly with intuition and the logic of English.)
Tovarish
Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2012 5:51:04 AM
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Congratulations to you for knowing more than one language englaa.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2012 11:32:09 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom

I don't think there's a common phrase, but a couple of understandable possibilities would be:
Juvenile self-importance
Adolescent vanity
Adolescent conceit

Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2012 12:25:30 PM

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teenage syndrome (not a real illness or a serious mental disorder - just a phase of growing up ;-)
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2012 12:44:34 PM

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This reminds me of an occasion in my teen years.

At a friend's house, he was arguing with his mother, attempting to tell her how things should be when she responded with, "It's amazing I have survived as long as I have, until you were old enough to tell me how to live!"

He was rendered speechless. I learned a lesson from his mistake: be careful what you say to your elders.
TL Hobs
Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2012 12:59:11 PM
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I think it is called "puberty" in English, when kids act on hormones rather than brain cells.
Hope2
Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2012 1:27:52 PM

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Hi englaa,

Welcome.

You used what we would have said in your question. 'Know-it-all'.

They also think they are invincible and are risk takers.


Here are a couple of websites for you re teens.

It seems they do what they have to do.

http://wellspringcounselingllc.com/resources/Typical+Characteristics+of+Teenagers.pdf


http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2011/10/teenage-brains/dobbs-text

:::::

FounDit - love your example. Might even be good for older offspring as a person becomes elderly. lol. Will have to remember that one.



Hope2
Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2012 1:31:25 PM

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Sorry, the whole address did not post so here is the list. It was neatly divided into categories. Oh well.


Typical Characteristics of Teenagers
Compiled by Bob Stahn
Emotionally
Near sighted
Invincible, risk taker
Self conscious
Doesn’t know self
Defensive often
Curious
Moody, chaotic internally Awkward
In transition from child to adult Confused/confusing
New and wonderful experiences Sensitive about self
Insensitive about others
Awkward
Energetic
Out of control
Rarely like own appearance
Gawky (as is anything in its adolescence) Growing (out of clothes)
Peer oriented/pressure Self conscious
In transition Unskilled/Awkward Manipulative
Without a niche
Liberated from “kid” status “Pairing up” interests Acceptance-focused behavior Individual identity
Black and white thinking
Abstract thinking
Idealistic thinking
Here-and-now thinking only (no future) Pseudo-stupidity (due to little experience)
Physically
Socially
Volatile
Know-it-all. **
Disconnected with others Experimenting
Enmeshed with peers
Unstable
Dependent
Independent (second toddlerhood) Narrow minded
Does not know self
Inadequate
Insecure
Experimenting
Hormone driven
Mobile/free
In transition from child to adult Often hungry or eating
Maybe adult body (but not maturity)
Be seen/recognized (“on stage”) Mobility
Freedom
Experimental
Insensitive about others Sensitive about self Clothes/status Manipulative Alone/misfit
Want distance from parents
Experimentation with boundaries Experimentation with values Question “Who am I?”
Question “Am I normal?”
Intellectually
Romany
Posted: Monday, October 1, 2012 12:44:27 AM
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I wonder if the expression 'teenage angst' could be close to what you are looking for, englaa?
englaa
Posted: Monday, October 1, 2012 10:24:56 AM
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Location: Taiwan
I cannot believe it!
All of you are so kind to share your opinions,
I've never think of having so many people helping me.
I'm a bit busy today, I will arrange the usages all of you recommended these days and make sure the meaning along with the feeling of them.
I'll also tell my classmate who asked me the question about your kindness.
Thank you so much! :)
Hope2
Posted: Monday, October 1, 2012 12:21:53 PM

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Englaa,

You are very welcome. Your feedback is appreciated.
englaa
Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2012 8:57:12 AM
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Location: Taiwan
Dear all,
Sorry for replying so late.
I have told the one who asked me this question your answers.
He then asked me another question.
"中二"(Chuuni), the word that composes Chuunibyou, itself is not a negative expression.
It means that someone wants to be recognized by others while wanting to be unique.
I cannot think of an English expression for this, can anyone help?
Thanks a lot for helping.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2012 9:41:56 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Thanks for getting back to us englaa.

There is a difficulty here, because many words of this type have two meanings, one positive and one negative. It depends how you say them, and the context.
Also, culturally, the concept of 'wanting to be recognised as better or unique' is considered to be a fault in Britain (less so in America, I think). The concept of wanting to be the best you can is positive.
In Britain, to say that a great person is 'very humble' is a high compliment.

The basic word is 'pride', I think.

POSITIVE:
pride n.
1. A sense of one's own proper dignity or value; self-respect.
2. Pleasure or satisfaction taken in an achievement, possession, or association: parental pride.
American Heritage
pride n
1. a feeling of honour and self-respect; a sense of personal worth
...
4. satisfaction or pleasure taken in one's own or another's success, achievements, etc. (esp in the phrase take (a) pride in)
Collins

Synonyms for this meaning are:
dignity, self-regard, self-respect, self-worth - the quality of being worthy of esteem or respect; "it was beneath his dignity to cheat"; "showed his true dignity when under pressure"
self-esteem, self-pride - a feeling of pride in yourself
1. satisfaction, achievement, fulfilment, the sense of pride in a job well done
2. self-respect, honour, dignity, self-esteem, self-image, self-worth, Her rejection was a severe blow to his pride.

NEGATIVE:
pride n.
...
3. Arrogant or disdainful conduct or treatment; haughtiness.
...
5. An excessively high opinion of oneself; conceit.
American Heritage
pride n
...
2. excessive self-esteem; conceit
Collins

Synonyms for this meaning are:
ego, self-importance, egotism - an inflated feeling of pride in your superiority to others
conceit, self-love, vanity - feelings of excessive pride
pride - unreasonable and inordinate self-esteem (personified as one of the deadly sins) superbia
arrogance, haughtiness, hauteur, high-handedness, lordliness - overbearing pride evidenced by a superior manner toward inferiors.

To be certain of having a positive meaning, the sense of 'dignity' or 'self respect' are probably your best words.
To be certain of a negative meaning (as in the 'illness of teenagers'), then you would probably use 'ego' or 'arrogance'.
englaa
Posted: Sunday, October 28, 2012 10:50:24 AM
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Dear Drag0nspeaker,
I got it.
Thank you so much for helping.
I'll tell my classmate.
Romany
Posted: Monday, October 29, 2012 6:23:23 AM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 18,351
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Englaa

You're right that in English there are no definitive words to express the concepts you cited in Japanese. Hope and Dragon et al gave you all the words which encompass what the state of being a teenager is all about. Because of this, I think that in English all these things are understood when we use the word Teenager or, the descriptive phrase I suggested above, Teen(age) angst.

We have the words 'pre-teen' which refers to a certain sub-set of kids from about 10 to 13 who are caught in the middle of not being children and not yet being teenagers, but this doesn't really refer to any emotional state: pre-teens are all about wanting to wear the same clothes, or listen to the same music as teenagers but their emotional development is still not very far advanced (They might still go to bed with teddy bears, or secretly love watching cartoons more than than anything else on tv.

So, when we use the word teenager - except, for example in a news piece where it is merely an age marker: "Two adults and 3 teenagers were trapped in a lift between floors to-day for 5 hours - we understand that the people we are talking about are going to be going through all the angst concerned in trying to build identities, finding themselves, hormonal swings etc. i.e. 'teenager' itself is understood as meaning all those things described in the the word lists supplied above.
Romany
Posted: Monday, October 29, 2012 6:24:49 AM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Englaa

You're right that in English there are no definitive words to express the concepts you cited in Japanese. Hope and Dragon et al gave you all the words which encompass what the state of being a teenager is all about. Because of this, I think that in English all these things are understood when we use the word Teenager or, the descriptive phrase I suggested above, Teen(age) angst.

We have the word 'pre-teen' which refers to a certain sub-set of kids from about 10 to 13 who are caught in the middle of not being children and not yet being teenagers, but this doesn't really refer to any emotional state: pre-teens are all about wanting to wear the same clothes, or listen to the same music as teenagers but their emotional development is still not very far advanced (They might still go to bed with teddy bears, or secretly love watching cartoons more than than anything else on tv.)

So, when we use the word teenager - except, for example in a news piece where it is merely an age marker: "Two adults and 3 teenagers were trapped in a lift between floors to-day for 5 hours - we understand that the people we are talking about are going to be going through all the angst concerned in trying to build identities, finding themselves, hormonal swings etc. i.e. 'teenager' itself is understood as meaning all those things described in the the word lists supplied above.
almostfreebird
Posted: Monday, October 29, 2012 7:36:37 AM
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Joined: 4/22/2011
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Location: Japan


After I checked YahooJapan and Urbandictionary and Wikipedia,

I can say Urbandictionary's explanation is pretty much trustworthy, so you could pick up some proper words from the list Hope2 offered:http://Typical Characteristics of Teenagers list




http://www.urbandictionary.com/Chuunibyou


This is a common stage in growth; for most people, it happens--you guessed it--around the 2nd year of middle school (Grade 8 in Japan). However, the problem is, there are some grown-ups who have this symptom.
There are 3 main types of Chuunibyou. DQN-type pretends to be antisocial even though they aren't, or can't be and has made-up stories about antisocial behavior. Subculture-type prefers subculture or minor trends just to be different and have the "cool" factor. Evil Eye-Type admires mystical powers and pretends to have one of their own, to the extent of establishing an alias just for that.
And if you think you have one of these or want more information in the subject, a good idea is to read the "Chuunibyou User Manual" (中二病取扱説明書, Chuunibyou Toriatsukai Setsumei Sho) by Saegami HYŌYA.

If you tl;dr I'm going to clobber you.
An example of DQN Chuunibyou:
"Look at all those bandages wrapped around you! What happened?"
"I had a bunch of gang fights."
"Come on, I know you're too kind to be a gangster."

An example of Subculture Chuunibyou:
"When I collect Pokémon cards, I only collect ones that are imported from Japan."
"Can you read all those?"
"-_-; S-sure I can..."

An example of Evil Eye Chuunibyou:
"Don't take that bandana off my left wrist. It's sealing an evil spirit inside me and if you take it off I may go berserk."
"Dude, calm down. You just have chuunibyou."



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