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Which novel is it? (5) Options
rogermue
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2012 2:09:34 PM

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He lay flat on the brown, pine-needled floor of the forest, his chin on his folded arms, and high overhead the wind blew in the tops of the pine trees. The mountainside sloped gently where he lay; but below it was steep and he could see the dark of the oiled road winding through the pass. There was a stream alongside the road and far down the pass he saw a mill beside the stream and the falling water of the dam, white in the summer sunlight.

"Is that the mill?" he asked.

"Yes."

"I do not remember it."

"It was built since you were here. The old mill is farther down; much below the pass."

He spread the photostated military map out on the forest floor and looked at it carefully. The old man looked over his shoulder. He was a short and solid old man in a black peasant's smock and gray iron-stiff trousers and he wore rope-soled shoes. He was breathing heavily from the climb and his hand rested on one of the two heavy packs they had been carrying.

"Then you cannot see the bridge from here."

"No," the old man said. "This is the easy country of the pass where the stream flows gently. Below, where the road turns out of sight in the trees, it drops suddenly and there is a steep gorge — "

"I remember."

"Across this gorge is the bridge."
Angus
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2012 2:53:34 PM
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Hemingway - For Whom the Bell Tolls
rogermue
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2012 3:19:36 PM

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Yes, that is it. For Whom The Bell Tolls, 1940 - Ernest Hemingway, USA.

The novel is still under copyright, so there is no online text. But fortunately I found a website with a passage, the link was given by en.wikipedia:
Text passage: For Whom The Bell Tolls

Reading this novel and seeing the film with Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman is an ever-lasting experience.

Wikipedia's first four lines on the book are good information:
For Whom the Bell Tolls is a novel by Ernest Hemingway published in 1940. It tells the story of Robert Jordan, a young American in the International Brigades attached to a republican guerrilla unit during the Spanish Civil War. As a dynamiter, he is assigned to blow up a bridge during an attack on the city of Segovia. Hemingway biographer Jeffrey Meyers writes that the novel is regarded as one of Hemingway's best works, along with The Sun Also Rises, The Old Man and the Sea, and A Farewell to Arms.


Gary Cooper as Robert Jordan and Ingrid Bergman as Maria in the 1943 film adaptation.

Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2012 4:06:35 PM

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Roger, do you know this?

Hell! God damn it to hell! Of all the goddamn jobs. - - I'd sure like to see someone whose brains haven't been altogether scrambled by this foolishness. Grown-up men pulling a damned sled like this up and down the forest...
thar
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2012 4:15:26 PM

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Not a fan of Hemingway, myself, but I will segue to John Donne:

Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions

MEDITATION XVII.

NUNC LENTO SONITU DICUNT, MORIERIS.

Now this bell tolling softly for another,
says to me, Thou must die.


PERCHANCE he for whom this bell tolls may be so ill as that he knows not it tolls for him. And perchance I may think myself so much better than I am, as that they who are about me, and see my state, may have caused it to toll for me, and I know not that. The church is catholic, universal, so are all her actions; all that she does, belongs to all. When she baptizes a child, that action concerns me; for that child is thereby connected to that head which is my head too, and ingraffed into that body, whereof I am a member. And when she buries a man, that action concerns me; all mankind is of one author, and is one volume; when one man dies, one chapter is not torn out of the book, but translated into a better language; and every chapter must be so translated; God employs several translators; some pieces are translated by age, some by sickness, some by war, some by justice; but God's hand is in every translation, and his hand shall bind up all our scattered leaves again, for that library where every book shall lie open to one another; as therefore the bell that rings to a sermon, calls not upon the preacher only, but upon the congregation to come; so this bell calls us all: but how much more me, who am brought so near the door by this sickness.

There was a contention as far as a suit (in which, piety and dignity, religion and estimation, were mingled) which of the religious orders should ring to prayers first in the morning; and it was determined, that they should ring first that rose earliest. If we understand aright the dignity of this bell, that tolls for our evening prayer, we would be glad to make it ours, by rising early, in that application, that it might be ours as well as his, whose indeed it is. The bell doth toll for him, that thinks it doth; and though it intermit again, yet from that minute, that that occasion wrought upon him, he is united to God. Who casts not up his eye to the sun when it rises? But who takes off his eye from a comet, when that breaks out? who bends not his ear to any bell, which upon any occasion rings? But who can remove it from that bell, which is passing a piece of himself out of this world?

No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main; if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friend's or of thine own were; any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.

Neither can we call this a begging of misery, or a borrowing of misery, as though we were not miserable enough of ourselves, but must fetch in more from the next house, in taking upon us the misery of our neighbors. Truly it were an excusable covetousness if we did; for affliction is a treasure, and scarce any man hath enough of it. No man hath afflicion enough, that is not matured and ripened by it, and made fit for God by that affliction. If a man carry treasure in bullion or in a wedge of gold, and have none coined into current moneys, his treasure will not defray him as he travels. Tribulation is treasure in the nature of it, but it is not current money in the use of it, except we get nearer and nearer our home, heaven, by it. Another may be sick too, and sick to death, and this affliction may lie in his bowels, as gold in a mine, and be of no use to him; but this bell that tells me of his affliction, digs out, and applies that gold to me: if by this consideration of another's danger, I take mine own into contemplation, and so secure myself, by making my recourse to my God, who is our only security.


John Donne, Devotions upon Emergent Occasions (1624)



[image not available]


version above from:
Donne, John. The Works of John Donne. vol III.
Henry Alford, ed.
London: John W. Parker, 1839. 574-5.


rogermue
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2012 4:42:12 PM

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To JJ - No, I don't know it. Reminds me of a film - 'Aguirre (don't know if the title is right) - but there are so many situations where such a phrase might occur.

To thar
Good that you mention John Donne. An idea whirled through my mind as to the title of the novel but it passed and didn't ring a bell. Yes, with his title Hemingway referred to John Donne. I think, he and some others are called 'Metaphysical Poets'.

thar
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2012 4:53:02 PM

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I really like John Donne. Apparently some think him the greatest love poet in English, but I love that he had a wicked sense of humour and writes the dirtiest poetry I know!

But, for a statement of humanity, I think you cannot get better than what he says in there:

No man is an island, entire of itself; every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main; if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as well as if a manor of thy friend's or of thine own were; any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.

We are all in this together!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2012 5:09:15 PM

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rogermue wrote:
To JJ - No, I don't know it. Reminds me of a film - 'Aguirre (don't know if the title is right) - but there are so many situations where such a phrase might occur.


That's from Väinö Linna's Tuntematon sotilas (The Unknown Soldier). One of the best Finnish novels telling a story of a group of soldiers in the Continuation War between Finland and USSR, 1941-44. Worth of reading even in English translation.

GeorgeV
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2012 9:53:34 PM
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.
rogermue - I presume you were referring to this: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0068182/
- unsurpassable
.
almostfreebird
Posted: Wednesday, May 16, 2012 11:13:56 PM
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GeorgeV wrote:
.
rogermue - I presume you were referring to this: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0068182/
- unsurpassable
.




Klaus Kinski is awesome!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_nfBCC_OJI




rogermue
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2012 2:29:14 AM

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Yes, I was referring to Aguirre, Wrath of God, Germany 1972 by director Werner Herzog, with Klaus Kinsky in the leading role. Really an exceptional film.



[image not available]
rogermue
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2012 2:53:56 AM

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To JJ
Thanks for the link to the Finnish novel Tuntematon sotilas (The Unknown Soldier). I had a look at the webside. Informative and excellent. I'll keep the title in mind.

That reminds me of another famous war novel All quiet on the Western Front (Im Westen nichts Neues, 1929) by Erich Maria Remarque who depicts World War I and a group of teenager soldiers who had just finished school. Not the heroic kind of a war novel.
Wikipedia: The book describes the German soldiers' extreme physical and mental stress during the war ...

The novel was mad into a successful film (two film adaptations).



[image not available]

Picture from the film All quiet on the Western Front, 1979.
One of the young soldiers in a shell crater with his dying friend who has just been hit by a bullet.
almostfreebird
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2012 3:23:01 AM
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rogermue wrote:



[image not available]

Picture from the film All quiet on the Western Front, 1979.
One of the young soldiers in a shell crater with his dying friend who has just been hit by a bullet.




I think that the picture is from 1930 movie(http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0020629/).

In 1979 movie(http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0078753/),

the young soldier (Paul Baumer played by lovable Richard Thomas)
was hit by a bullet in the front line when he stood to watch a bird, that was the last scene, I think.

rogermue
Posted: Thursday, May 17, 2012 3:42:37 AM

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I think you are right, afb. Should take more time when looking for pictures.
But mistakes happen.
rogermue
Posted: Monday, May 21, 2012 2:08:54 AM

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Tomahawk71
Posted: Monday, May 21, 2012 9:32:25 AM

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I believe Steinbeck is a greater novelist than Hemingway. I like his socialist side.
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