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When I read a book I seem to read it with my eyes only, but now and then I come across a passage, perhaps only a phrase,... Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2012 12:00:00 AM
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When I read a book I seem to read it with my eyes only, but now and then I come across a passage, perhaps only a phrase, which has a meaning for me, and it becomes part of me.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965)
pedro
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2012 5:24:45 AM
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Sounds as if he might have been dyslexic
thar
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2012 7:18:36 AM

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a study: do people who read braille show a different taste in literature to those who read with their eyes? ie, do different authors / styles stand out better in particular media of delivery?...

hmm, there is the added cultural factor of them being blind - I need control groups of sighted people who read braille and blind people who read print...this research proposal may require some more work...Think
Jimbob
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2012 4:55:42 PM
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W.Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) an expert storyteller and a master of fiction technique.

Me like this one, comes from his book "Of Human Bondage (1915) partly autobiographical" no need to type up context pretty much says it all, although I had a quick read anyway. I guess we may even live our lives around such meaningful words or even store them away in our vast memories for future reference like a library or a hardrive :)
floyd
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2012 5:02:23 PM
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Friends --

I appreciated your comments, Thar and Pedro. If it's possible to award two smiles in one day, you each should get one.

I think of Maugham as a master of the brilliant passage and the perfect phrase. I do get a lot of pleasure from finding a passage or phrase that has meaning for me, but I get deeper pleasure from a book that has meaning for me. Do you think that's why Maugham was a writer, and I'm just a reader?

In fact, now that I think about it, Maugham might have been an even more powerful writer if he had gone deeper than his extraordinary passages and phrases. For me, when I've read his books, it seems to have been mostly with my eyes.

So, Thar, do we need a double-blind study on this? d'oh!

from friend floyd
kitten
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2012 7:32:32 PM
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Daemon wrote:
When I read a book I seem to read it with my eyes only, but now and then I come across a passage, perhaps only a phrase, which has a meaning for me, and it becomes part of me.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965)



The above quote is from, Of, Human Bondage. I think in context it makes a little sense. I don't know the chapter as i still don't have my lappy.Silenced And the library is a hoot and a half.Shhh Whistle


“When I read a book I seem to read it with my eyes only, but now and then I come across a passage, perhaps only a phrase, which has meaning for me, and it becomes part of me; I’ve got out of the book all that’s any use to me, and I can’t get anything more if I read it a dozen times. You see, it seems to me, one’s like a closed bud, and most of what one reads and does has no effect at all; but there are certain things that have a peculiar significance for one, and they open a petal; and the petals open one by one; and at last the flower is there.” ― W. Somerset Maugham, Of Human Bondage


Please thank www.goodreads.com for the quote in context.


peace out, >^,,^<
kitten
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2012 7:34:38 PM
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Daemon wrote:
When I read a book I seem to read it with my eyes only, but now and then I come across a passage, perhaps only a phrase, which has a meaning for me, and it becomes part of me.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965)



The above quote is from, Of, Human Bondage. I think in context it makes a little sense. I don't know the chapter as i still don't have my lappy.Silenced And the library is a hoot and a half.Shhh Whistle


“When I read a book I seem to read it with my eyes only, but now and then I come across a passage, perhaps only a phrase, which has meaning for me, and it becomes part of me; I’ve got out of the book all that’s any use to me, and I can’t get anything more if I read it a dozen times. You see, it seems to me, one’s like a closed bud, and most of what one reads and does has no effect at all; but there are certain things that have a peculiar significance for one, and they open a petal; and the petals open one by one; and at last the flower is there.” ― W. Somerset Maugham, Of Human Bondage


Please thank www.goodreads.com for the quote in context.


peace out, >^,,^<


d'oh! d'oh! Boo hoo! Boo hoo! Sorry for the double post, the library is slow at times.Anxious
MTC
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2012 8:02:33 PM
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Emerson shares the same opinion about reading as Maugham's character, Philip, in Of Human Bondage:

'Tis the good reader that makes the good book; in every book he finds passages which seem confidences or asides hidden from all else and unmistakenly meant for his ear.
Ralph Waldo Emerson, Society and Solitude (1870), "Success"

Modern science understands reading as an interactive process in which the reader "converses" which the book, bringing his or her life experiences to bear, and extracts personal meaning. Sometimes isolated passages will resonate with the reader, sometimes an entire book. Each time we revisit a favorite novel or poem our life experience will be different and the "dialog" with the book will be different too. We will find different meanings in the same text and discover something different about ourselves. In time some books become our friends and companions, while others we barely become acquainted with, and others are left entirely behind. Almost four hundred years ago John Fletcher anticipated much of the modern understanding about reading:

That place that does contain
My books, the best companions, is to me
A glorious court, where hourly I converse
With the old sages and philosophers;
And sometimes, for variety, I confer
With kings and emperors, and weigh their counsels.
John Fletcher, The Elder Brother (c. 1625; published 1637), Act I, scene 2.


In today's quotation from Of Human Bondage the protagonist Philip explains why he reads to Lawson the artist:


"I don't see the use of reading the same thing over and over again," said Philip. "That's only a laborious form of idleness."


"But are you under the impression that you have so great a mind that you can understand the most profound writer at a first reading?"


"I don't want to understand him, I'm not a critic. I'm not interested in him for his sake but for mine."


"Why d'you read then?"


"Partly for pleasure, because it's a habit and I'm just as uncomfortable if I don't read as if I don't smoke, and partly to know myself. When I read a book I seem to read it with my eyes only, but now and then I come across a passage, perhaps only a phrase, which has a meaning for ME, and it becomes part of me; I've got out of the book all that's any use to me, and I can't get anything more if I read it a dozen times. You see, it seems to me, one's like a closed bud, and most of what one reads and does has no effect at all; but there are certain things that have a peculiar significance for one, and they open a petal; and the petals open one by one; and at last the flower is there."


Philip was not satisfied with his metaphor, but he did not know how else to explain a thing which he felt and yet was not clear about.

Of Human Bondage, Chapter LXVII

(http://www.nalanda.nitc.ac.in/resources/english/etext-project/Maugham/humbn10/chapter67.html)


So Philip understands reading as a vehicle of self-discovery, from which personal meaning may sometimes blossom. But, he does not grasp what Lawson understands: by revisiting the same book later we may extract different meaning.





RubyMoon
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2012 10:51:49 PM
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... but now and then I come across a passage, perhaps only a phrase, which has a meaning for me, and it becomes part of me.

This is the main reason I read and bookmark such passages, and often return.
excaelis
Posted: Friday, January 20, 2012 11:25:28 PM

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The closing lines of One Day In The Life Of Ivan Denisovich by Alexander Solzhenitsyn. 140 pages of genius. I beg of you, please read this book - it'll only take a couple of hours. When you do you'll feel the weight of that last line like a freight train, how much each day, each minute counts when we are not free :

"A day without a dark cloud. Almost a happy day. There were three thousand six hundred and fifty-three days like that in his stretch. From the first clang of the rail to the last clang of the rail. Three thousand six hundred and fifty-three days. The three extra days were for leap years."
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, January 21, 2012 12:39:42 PM

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thar wrote:
a study: do people who read braille show a different taste in literature to those who read with their eyes? ie, do different authors / styles stand out better in particular media of delivery?...

hmm, there is the added cultural factor of them being blind - I need control groups of sighted people who read braille and blind people who read print...this research proposal may require some more work...Think




How does one find blind people who read print? Think




RubyMoon
Posted: Sunday, January 22, 2012 12:20:47 PM
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"A day without a dark cloud. Almost a happy day. There were three thousand six hundred and fifty-three days like that in his stretch. From the first clang of the rail to the last clang of the rail. Three thousand six hundred and fifty-three days. The three extra days were for leap years."


Yes.

edit to add: Thank you excaelis for the suggested reading - very much appreciated.
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