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Everybody who is incapable of learning has taken to teaching. Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 12:00:00 AM
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Everybody who is incapable of learning has taken to teaching.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900)
reiki333
Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 2:39:46 AM
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Brick wall He must have loved to argue...Brick wall
JamesIsobel
Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 3:00:49 AM
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A well known army saying for the bewildered "If you cannot do it Teach"

I was fairly useless in the army, and subsequently I became an instructor of tank gunnery and missile control. eventually I became the regimental IG (the head honcho, after 22 years at this I became a Police officer, again I became an Small arms instructor, 26 yeras in the Construction Industry as an instructor. have BA (Chem) MIIRSM and various accolades, cannot do them to a great degree but boy could I teach, have many commendations.
so Mr Wild, that expression was one of the things that you seemed to have got correct.
Marissa La Faye Isolde
Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 8:17:14 AM
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There are so many teachers who lack the ability to teach. If you had a gift for teaching, your contribution to mankind has been great.
jcbarros
Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 11:22:00 AM

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"The wise know their weakness too well to assume infallibility, and he who knows most, knows best how little he knows" (T. Jefferson) The he becomes a boss. :)
jcbarros
Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 11:22:50 AM

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...then...
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 11:45:51 AM

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I hope this is another line taken out of context because it is foolish on the face of it if one reads it as is; for if only the incapable teach, then everyone would know nothing as the capable among us would keep knowledge to themselves and that knowledge would die with them. Furthermore, who would seek as a teacher one who cannot accomplish the task to be learned?

Granted, not everyone is a great teacher, but if nothing else, by their failure, they teach that fact.
RubyMoon
Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 1:30:26 PM
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The Project Gutenberg eBook, Intentions, by Oscar Wilde

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net

Transcribed from the 1913 edition by David Price,
email ccx074@coventry.ac.uk

INTENTIONS

Contents

The Decay of Lying
Pen, Pencil, and Poison
The Critic as Artist
The Truth of Masks


THE DECAY OF LYING: AN OBSERVATION
A DIALOGUE. Persons: Cyril and Vivian. Scene: the Library of a country house in Nottinghamshire.

CYRIL (coming in through the open window from the terrace). My dear Vivian, don't coop yourself up all day in the library. It is a perfectly lovely afternoon. The air is exquisite. There is a mist upon the woods, like the purple bloom upon a plum. Let us go and lie on the grass and smoke cigarettes and enjoy Nature.

VIVIAN. Enjoy Nature! I am glad to say that I have entirely lost that faculty. People tell us that Art makes us love Nature more than we loved her before; that it reveals her secrets to us; and that after a careful study of Corot and Constable we see things in her that had escaped our observation. My own experience is that the more we study Art, the less we care for Nature. What Art really reveals to us is Nature's lack of design, her curious crudities, her extraordinary monotony, her absolutely unfinished condition. Nature has good intentions, of course, but, as Aristotle once said, she cannot carry them out. When I look at a landscape I cannot help seeing all its defects. It is fortunate for us, however, that Nature is so imperfect, as otherwise we should have no art at all. Art is our spirited protest, our gallant attempt to teach Nature her proper place. As for the infinite variety of Nature, that is a pure myth. It is not to be found in Nature herself. It resides in the imagination, or fancy, or cultivated blindness of the man who looks at her.

CYRIL. Well, you need not look at the landscape. You can lie on the grass and smoke and talk.

VIVIAN. But Nature is so uncomfortable. Grass is hard and lumpy and damp, and full of dreadful black insects. Why, even Morris's poorest workman could make you a more comfortable seat than the whole of Nature can. Nature pales before the furniture of 'the street which from Oxford has borrowed its name,' as the poet you love so much once vilely phrased it. I don't complain. If Nature had been comfortable, mankind would never have invented architecture, and I prefer houses to the open air. In a house we all feel of the proper proportions. Everything is subordinated to us, fashioned for our use and our pleasure. Egotism itself, which is so necessary to a proper sense of human dignity, is entirely the result of indoor life. Out of doors one becomes abstract and impersonal. One's individuality absolutely leaves one. And then Nature is so indifferent, so unappreciative. Whenever I am walking in the park here, I always feel that I am no more to her than the cattle that browse on the slope, or the burdock that blooms in the ditch. Nothing is more evident than that Nature hates Mind. Thinking is the most unhealthy thing in the world, and people die of it just as they die of any other disease. Fortunately, in England at any rate, thought is not catching. Our splendid physique as a people is entirely due to our national stupidity. I only hope we shall be able to keep this great historic bulwark of our happiness for many years to come; but I am afraid that we are beginning to be over-educated; at least everybody who is incapable of learning has taken to teaching--that is really what our enthusiasm for education has come to. In the meantime, you had better go back to your wearisome uncomfortable Nature, and leave me to correct my proofs.



W. H. Auden: “A professor is one who talks in someone else's sleep”
Maggie
Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 1:57:59 PM
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“I would rather be governed by the first 2000 people in the Manhattan phone book than the entire faculty of Harvard.”
― William F. Buckley Jr.
Hope1
Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 3:27:26 PM
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Daemon, inside Farlex computers, seems to like Oscar Wilde. He is quoted here a lot.

Wilde was known for his flippancy while trying to be witty. He may have said this with 'tongue in cheek'. Maybe in his day and age it was true. I am not THAT old so I do not know. Nowadays teachers are highly qualified and have better methods to stimulate and enhance learning. (Where I live anyhow - I can not speak for the world.) Of course, there are good and bad in every profession.

I know a lot of very capable people who love children and young adullts. They decided to become teachers
even though they could have had more lucrative careers. Training young minds is an awesome responsibility. I am not sure but I doubt Wilde was ever a teacher. If he were here today I might say to him that it is best to write about what you have knowledge. It is a long distance from a chair to a podium.

Many years ago, as well as teaching English, I was put into a classroom and told to teach art as a second subject! (They would never do that nowadays.) I learned as I went and now have oil painting as a lucrative hobby.

Wilde had an interesting life. We never tire of seeing the stage plays of 'The Importance of Being Earnest'. That is a fun fluff play.

As for William Buckley Jr.'s statement, I would not want to be governed by Harvard Faculty either. They are teachers, not politicians. Although I just wrote about Canada's newsmaker of 2011 who was one of the best, most caring, competent politicians in a long while. He had a lot letters behind his name and was a professor first. ("Love is better than Anger" in Knowledge and Culture) I do not like being governed by lawyers either, but most politicians are lawyers. We need some scientists and business people, - and more women - to do a better job.
RubyMoon
Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 4:03:58 PM
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Thanks for the post, Hope1... I was just supplying the context. (I so give up !)
Hope1
Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 4:25:21 PM
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Hey RubyMoon,

I guess I did come across as very passionate! But it was directed at Oscar Wilde. And maybe Bernard Shaw -

He who can, does. He who cannot, teaches.
George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman (1903) "Maxims for Revolutionists"
Irish dramatist & socialist (1856 - 1950)

Maybe Shaw was talking about sports pros who have 'lost their knees'? MAYBE I will give him the benefit of the doubt. :-)

We love Shaw and see a lot of his plays (and others) frequently as there is a Shaw Festival not too far from where we live. (We also have the Stratford Shakespearean Festival Theatre not far in another direction.Toronto also has a lot of theatres.)

I will check out your website when I get a minute.
Hope1
Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 5:08:42 PM
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RubyMoon,

I was thinking - usually either dangerous or costs money - but

Maybe my 'passion' was really directed at all those people who over the years gave me grief about teachers' salaries, hours, holidays, easy job just babysitting a bunch of kids etc. etc.

I learned to smile sweetly and ask if the reason they were not in university in the teacher training course was because there were no spaces available for such a popular vocation.

I have been meaning to email you to ask how you are managing your computer problems. Glad to see you on the forum.
RubyMoon
Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 5:20:09 PM
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Well, thanks again Hope1... not managing my computers problems very well at all.
I never set up a website... just noticed the icon. Who did that ?

Am no longer on this forum... my father's funeral was on New Year's Eve... finally listened to him in my sleep last night, beautiful dreamer that he was - he told me to please, please quit TFD.

Happy New Year to All !
Hope1
Posted: Saturday, December 31, 2011 6:15:32 PM
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So sorry to hear you are quitting TFD and that this is the anniversary of your Father's funeral.

No matter how old we are or they are, the loss of a parent is always very hard.
floyd
Posted: Monday, January 2, 2012 9:10:00 PM
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RubyMoon --

I'm sorry, too, that you're leaving. You are one of my first and wisest buddies on this crazy forum.

I'm responding, thinking that maybe you would enjoy some light thoughts about a father's perspective on fathers and daughters.

You take my daughter, for instance. She'a a 45-year-old physician with a beautiful spirit that's a lot like my wife's. Sometimes I tell her what to do, and I feel like she always listens to me. I know I can give her loving support, but I also know that my "fatherly advice" will seldom, if ever, be heeded. In fact, that's fine with me, because she is loving and wonderful, as daughters so often are, and she probably knows better.

But then you look at my daughter's advice to me -- like four years ago when she told me she had found a meditation course I had to take. Well, that got my back up, all right! I said that decision was mine to make, and then told her all the reasons why I didn't want to do it then. And then, I thought about it and took the course. Ever since, I've been doing daily meditation, and that probably saved my life. (You and I have exchanged postings in the past about what it takes to be a caregiver.)

So, from my self interest in having you around, I say think about whether your father (1) really expected you to take his advice, and (2) whether fathers really know best.

But as your buddy, I have to say that I respect your judgment a lot, and I respect even more your relationship with your father's memory. In fact I say shame on me! My wife just died, and I should be the last to joke about what we think and do in our grief. My guess is that you and your father loved each other with the kind of depth and happiness that my daughter and I share.

So I say, listen to him; we fathers deserve a break every so often. And my best wishes as you live through anniversaries, like New Year's eve.

Take good care,

floyd



floyd
Posted: Monday, January 2, 2012 9:19:57 PM
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P.S.

Hope1, my wife taught in junior high school to get me through law school, and my daughter is now teaching in medical school. If you ever see me say a bad word about teachers, shoot me on the spot.

floyd again

Marissa La Faye Isolde
Posted: Monday, January 2, 2012 11:03:45 PM
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Ruby, why does your father want you to quit TFD? This seems (to me) so strange of a request. However, if this be your wish, no matter how disappointed I am--as I am sure others are too--Floyd has eloquently expressed my sentiments to you. Fare thee well Ruby. Come back to us when you can. Marissa.
RubyMoon
Posted: Monday, January 2, 2012 11:49:32 PM
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Dear floyd -

Thank you very, very much. Your sincerity and reflections are truly heart-warming. Yes, as I became older my father often turned to me for advice. But when I turned twenty-one he told me he no longer would give me advice unless I asked him...we had many deep, profound and memorable conversations about everything, and I mean EVERYthing ! It was a Blessing of the highest order.

floyd, I am so sorry for your great loss - your wife was obviously a wonderful woman.

And I certainly remember our initial friendship on the forum. Thank you again !


All the Best to you, Ruby



[image not available]


Marissa, thank you also. It was a dream I had, so I can't really ask him why (he's dead). But your question is making me smile so much... I appreciate it, and appreciate you !

(Maybe I'll hold a seance and find out... Tilly, is that you ?)
JamesIsobel
Posted: Monday, January 16, 2012 8:27:23 AM
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It just occurred to me, perhaps people who can, and can do it with a degree of expertise quite simply find that they are so fully involved with the subject that it is all consuming and that they just do not have the time or inclination to teach.

On the other hand, perhaps it is simply that the teachers, although reasonably proficient in the subject, the interest is fleeting and they turn to teaching in order to fulfil both needs, the need to learn more and to pass on their knowledge.

I personally found that when teaching I had to ensure that I had the subject firmly and fully, and infallibly in my mind before I taught. In my mind I was terrified that someone would ask me something to do with the subject in hand and I could not give the answer immediately.

Just a fleeting thought.
MTC
Posted: Monday, January 16, 2012 9:48:08 AM
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When Oscar Wilde said, "Everybody who is incapable of learning has taken to teaching," he was imitating G.B. Shaw who said , "He who can, does. He who cannot, teaches."
--G.B. Shaw, "Maxims for Revolutionists" in Man and Superman

Old wine in new bottles.
pedro
Posted: Monday, January 16, 2012 10:03:57 AM
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During a brief spell working with Ofsted (no teachers, I wasn't a dreaded inspector) I had the idea of posting some graffiti in the toilets to the effect of 'He who can teaches. He who cannot inspects" only translated into old Babylonian or Sanskrit etc just to see how long it survived.
Hope1
Posted: Monday, January 16, 2012 11:19:18 AM
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Pedro,

Love your idea. Bet you did not do it? If it was translated, how would they know what it meant?

pedro
Posted: Wednesday, January 18, 2012 4:48:05 AM
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Hi Hope1

No I didn't alas but I think even the classically trained would have been rusty enough not to notice!
edemefred
Posted: Friday, July 10, 2015 7:12:48 AM
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Daemon wrote:
Everybody who is incapable of learning has taken to teaching.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900)
IMcRout
Posted: Friday, July 10, 2015 9:08:00 AM
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Everybody who is incapable of contributing something original has taken to copying and pasting ancient threads. Brick wall
Irma Crespo
Posted: Friday, July 10, 2015 11:00:21 PM

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How could you teach if you do not have learned how to do it? It is not easy to acquire that gift easily, unless, of course you were born with it, and still it is necessary to acquire new knowledge every day about innovations on this subject.I come from a family of teachers and professors and it makes me feel very proud. Prouder tan if I had come from a family of ignorant richmen.
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