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All meanings, we know, depend on the key of interpretation. Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, December 26, 2011 12:00:00 AM
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All meanings, we know, depend on the key of interpretation.

George Eliot (1819-1880)
MTC
Posted: Monday, December 26, 2011 5:46:14 AM
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The quotation is from Daniel Deronda, Book I, "The Spoiled Child," Chapter V:

Miss Gwendolen, quite aware that she was adored by this unexceptionable young clergyman with pale whiskers and square-cut collar, felt nothing more on the subject than that she had no objection to being adored: she turned her eyes on him with calm mercilessness and caused him many mildly agitating hopes by seeming always to avoid dramatic contact with him--for all meanings, we know, depend on the key of interpretation.
Some persons might have thought beforehand that a young man of Anglican leanings, having a sense of sacredness much exercised on small things as well as great, rarely laughing save from politeness, and in general regarding the mention of spades by their naked names as rather coarse, would not have seen a fitting bride for himself in a girl who was daring in ridicule, and showed none of the special grace required in the clergyman's wife; or, that a young man informed by theological reading would have reflected that he was not likely to meet the taste of a lively, restless young lady like Miss Harleth. But are we always obliged to explain why the facts are not what some persons thought beforehand? The apology lies on their side, who had that erroneous way of thinking.
Thommy
Posted: Monday, December 26, 2011 7:33:59 AM
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A very good quote,too.

For the time being,I have a superior who always
interprets my sayings in his own strange,
negative way to criticise me wherether possible.
Perhaps he intents to show who the boss is and to
do some mobbing.
However,I am going to fight back with his own
weapons.
Perhaps I will lose that game but my motto has
always been "He who fights can lose,he who doesn't fight
has already lost".
jcbarros
Posted: Monday, December 26, 2011 11:47:58 AM

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This is some kind of tautology.
GabhSigenod
Posted: Tuesday, December 27, 2011 7:54:50 AM

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A plausible observation, Marian.
FounDit
Posted: Tuesday, December 27, 2011 11:19:58 AM

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It would appear, and would likely be agreed to be true by any persons who care to judge such things, that nearly two centuries ago, a writer wishing to invest and express an excellent degree of thoughtfulness concerning the characters in a novel under construction, executed a diligent search for as many descriptive words as could possibly be put together in a sentence of extraordinary length in order to accomplish the task set beforehand of offering to the reader as florid an account as can be mustered through a plentitude of verbiage; leading the reader to find himself or herself in a thewless state as a result of slogging through the sometimes convoluted logorrhea of descriptions of events and details not entirely necessary to carrying the story forward in an appreciable manner.




MTC
Posted: Tuesday, December 27, 2011 8:25:45 PM
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Eliot

Some persons might have thought beforehand that a young man of Anglican leanings, having a sense of sacredness much exercised on small things as well as great, rarely laughing save from politeness, and in general regarding the mention of spades by their naked names as rather coarse, would not have seen a fitting bride for himself in a girl who was daring in ridicule, and showed none of the special grace required in the clergyman's wife; or, that a young man informed by theological reading would have reflected that he was not likely to meet the taste of a lively, restless young lady like Miss Harleth. But are we always obliged to explain why the facts are not what some persons thought beforehand? The apology lies on their side, who had that erroneous way of thinking.

FounDit

It would appear, and would likely be agreed to be true by any persons who care to judge such things, that nearly two centuries ago, a writer wishing to invest and express an excellent degree of thoughtfulness concerning the characters in a novel under construction, executed a diligent search for as many descriptive words as could possibly be put together in a sentence of extraordinary length in order to accomplish the task set beforehand of offering to the reader as florid an account as can be mustered through a plentitude of verbiage; leading the reader to find himself or herself in a thewless state as a result of slogging through the sometimes convoluted logorrhea of descriptions of events and details not entirely necessary to carrying the story forward in an appreciable manner.

Yours truly

Some idle persons with more time than wit might have thought beforehand that a young man of literary leanings, having a sense of verbal propriety much exercised on things small as well as great, rarely laughing save from the appearance of civility, and in general regarding the mention of spades by their naked names as perhaps the highest of editorial goals, could hardly have found a more fitting task for himself than to parody an author much prone to prolixity, daring in his ridicule, and showing none of the heightened respect required of a reverential reader; or, that a young man informed by readings in literary criticism would have reflected that he was not likely to ingratiate himself with the author's loyal albeit sycophantic readers, nor meet their tastes for bloated but occasionally elegant prose.

Marissa La Faye Isolde
Posted: Tuesday, December 27, 2011 10:43:35 PM
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I thought this passage from George Elliot was extremely well written. I think this passage is among the best writings I have read on this forum.
FounDit
Posted: Wednesday, December 28, 2011 11:02:32 AM

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MTC wrote:
Eliot

Some persons might have thought beforehand that a young man of Anglican leanings, having a sense of sacredness much exercised on small things as well as great, rarely laughing save from politeness, and in general regarding the mention of spades by their naked names as rather coarse, would not have seen a fitting bride for himself in a girl who was daring in ridicule, and showed none of the special grace required in the clergyman's wife; or, that a young man informed by theological reading would have reflected that he was not likely to meet the taste of a lively, restless young lady like Miss Harleth. But are we always obliged to explain why the facts are not what some persons thought beforehand? The apology lies on their side, who had that erroneous way of thinking.

FounDit

It would appear, and would likely be agreed to be true by any persons who care to judge such things, that nearly two centuries ago, a writer wishing to invest and express an excellent degree of thoughtfulness concerning the characters in a novel under construction, executed a diligent search for as many descriptive words as could possibly be put together in a sentence of extraordinary length in order to accomplish the task set beforehand of offering to the reader as florid an account as can be mustered through a plentitude of verbiage; leading the reader to find himself or herself in a thewless state as a result of slogging through the sometimes convoluted logorrhea of descriptions of events and details not entirely necessary to carrying the story forward in an appreciable manner.

Yours truly

Some idle persons with more time than wit might have thought beforehand that a young man of literary leanings, having a sense of verbal propriety much exercised on things small as well as great, rarely laughing save from the appearance of civility, and in general regarding the mention of spades by their naked names as perhaps the highest of editorial goals, could hardly have found a more fitting task for himself than to parody an author much prone to prolixity, daring in his ridicule, and showing none of the heightened respect required of a reverential reader; or, that a young man informed by readings in literary criticism would have reflected that he was not likely to ingratiate himself with the author's loyal albeit sycophantic readers, nor meet their tastes for bloated but occasionally elegant prose.


FounDit:


No writer, having spent time and effort in composing what he believes to be an accomplished piece of prose, desires to have said exercise misunderstood by those who, like the proverbial touch-me-not, that flower of sensitivity to which we sometimes compare our companions in life, are oft quick to engage by virtue of offense when none is desirous of being given, and indeed, was merely making an observation on the turgid writing styles of days gone by and that of modernity, finding the juxtaposition of the two somewhat comical, but the latter of which, thankfully, is lacking that prolixity, and had not thought to seek either ingratiation with or the pique of the sycophantic lovers of such; rather enjoined now by a sense of having accomplished a task not desired nor aimed for, do seek to palliate by this apologia if offense was taken where none was intended and pray therefore that there be found an end thereof.
percivalpecksniff
Posted: Wednesday, December 28, 2011 1:31:07 PM
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Ah... so now we have verbosity at its worst.
percivalpecksniff
Posted: Wednesday, December 28, 2011 1:32:16 PM
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Ah... so now we have verbosity at its worst. Twice for emphasis.
MTC
Posted: Wednesday, December 28, 2011 6:29:02 PM
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To FounDit: Yes, and a blessed but bloated end it be.

To percival: Intending no disrespect, in your idle moments you may wish to consult http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parody
percivalpecksniff
Posted: Thursday, December 29, 2011 6:38:55 AM
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To MTC. Yes of course, and you may wish to consult a dictionary and look under the word 'joke.' The word 'touché' may have some resonance as well.


Tongue in cheek old boy....what?
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