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What words have you heard recently, that you had never heard of before? Options
risadr
Posted: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 12:04:58 PM
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Luftmarque wrote:
I was just made aware of the word gormless used by an Australian poster on the Internet Movie Database board. Saw it in another place since, too.

I remember the English GRE fondly, there is an inevitable aspect of randomness to the thing--which particular unusual words they happen to present you with on a given day. Good luck!


What does gormless mean? That sounds like one that would be fun to try and sneak into conversations.
krmiller
Posted: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 5:22:52 PM
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risadr wrote:
What does gormless mean? That sounds like one that would be fun to try and sneak into conversations.


TFD basically says it means stupid, which I know is how it's usually used, but I've always thought it literally meant toothless. M-W agrees with TFD, so I guess I just made up that definition!
betford2
Posted: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 11:50:55 PM
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Rinkusu wrote:
...And it meant something like 'an area for pedestrians only' or something. ...


I think they call that a "sidewalk." :)
Sarachan
Posted: Friday, April 3, 2009 1:42:28 PM
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NYT Magazine's "On Language" column from 3.01.09 has a good one: tranche. It's French for "slice; a cutting; the division into portions." Recently, it's been used to discuss the allocation of pieces of the TARP legislation. Mitch McConnell is quoted as having said, "We are looking for assurances about how this new tranche of TARP funding will be used."
Gayatri Menon
Posted: Friday, April 3, 2009 2:56:07 PM
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Here are some....

1) Fissiparous = divisive, or breaking into parts.
2) Eminence grise = a powerful person.
3) Ludic = playful
4) Fictile = capable of being moulded.
5) Legerdemain = artful deception.
6) Protean = versatile.
7) Periphrastic = rounabout, and unnecessarily wordy.
8) Solipsistic = extremey egocentric.

Need more ?
theres
Posted: Wednesday, April 8, 2009 4:51:19 AM
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Location: Europe, Switzerland
Joseph Glantz wrote:
Sesquipedalian is one of my favorites. Sesqui means one and a half. So a sesquicentennial would be 1.5 centuries ore 150 years. Ped is, I believe, Latin for foot. So sesquipedalian means measuring a foot and half. It's almost the perfect word since it's definition is also its attribute. A sesquipedalian word is a a real mouthful


I came upon "sesquipedalianism" by an English friend who wanted me to find out what it means. It cost me quite some time Think since I'm German speaking but a great lover of the English language.
I came to the same conclusion as you did, Joseph. Sesqui = one and a half and ped = Latin for foot. theres
Epiphileon
Posted: Friday, April 10, 2009 12:14:25 PM

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prurient
adj.
1. Inordinately interested in matters of sex; lascivious.
grammargeek
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2009 8:31:22 PM
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These two words have been used in various TFD posts, and I found myself a bit surprised that I was not previously familiar with them. They are now on my word list, but I haven't really owned them yet.

disabuse

riposte
Geeman
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2009 9:53:25 PM

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crepitate: To make a crackling or popping sound; crackle. to make a rattling or crackling sound; rattle or crackle.

This word is particularly interesting when associated with knuckles cracking, or the sound of dry bones rubbing together.
musicwriter
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2009 10:06:23 PM
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Joseph Glantz wrote:
Sesquipedalian is one of my favorites. Sesqui means one and a half. So a sesquicentennial would be 1.5 centuries ore 150 years. Ped is, I believe, Latin for foot. So sesquipedalian means measuring a foot and half. It's almost the perfect word since it's definition is also its attribute. A sesquipedalian word is a a real mouthful


You are right. I recall when the state of Ohio marked its sequicentennial in 1953.
musicwriter
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2009 10:09:49 PM
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aldi09 wrote:
CONVOLUTED. 1. Having numerous overlapping coils or folds: a convoluted seashell.
2. Intricate; complicated: convoluted legal language; convoluted reasoning.

Reminds me of "convolution" as in the bend of a river. The Mississippi has many of them- just look on a US map.
RRP
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2009 10:34:00 PM
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