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What words have you heard recently, that you had never heard of before? Options
risadr
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2009 2:26:31 PM
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In preparation for the GRE, I'm on a quest for new and interesting vocabulary words.

Enlighten me. Please.
Rinkusu
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2009 3:44:33 PM
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...well...

There was some word I saw the other day that I'd never seen before. I forget what it was, but I believe it started with 'c'. And it meant something like 'an area for pedestrians only' or something. ...though maybe this is a more common word than I think, and we just never hear it out here in the rural areas..

I've also learned some words from friends that I'd never heard before that: 'inane' (love that word), 'innuendo', and 'lemon' as a slang word meaning 'crappy car'.

The last two English, non-video-game-related words to come up in a conversation with friends that I'd never heard before were 'nymphomania' and 'necrophiliac'. ...eh
risadr
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2009 3:57:10 PM
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Inane is one of my all-time favorite vocabulary words.
Rinkusu
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2009 4:23:19 PM
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Same here! That and 'excruciating'. I'm pretty sure there was another word I liked to use too much too, but I can't remember what it was now.
wordnerd
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2009 4:47:59 PM
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My father used to trick us with the word "phthisic." It's pronounced TIZ-ik. He'd ask us to spell it and of course we'd begin with "t..." and he'd laugh and say, "Try again." It's an adjective that refers to a wasting disease of the lungs, such as asthma or TB.

An odd feature of this word is that in the noun--phthisis--the initial sound is pronounced "as "TH" and the "i" is long: THIGH-sis.

One of my favorite word curiosities.
Tamara
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2009 7:00:41 PM
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Absquatulate. It came up in a crossword, and I had to go to the OED to find out what it meant. Now... let's see if I can remember correctly. It's an old americanism that isn't used much anymore but means to steal something and then run off with it. I recommend looking it up yourself. It's a great word.
MiTziGo
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2009 7:21:57 PM
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How 'bout "defenestrate," a verb meaning to throw out a window- that's an obscure one I like. Also, I love working the word "bizarre" into conversations lately, I like the way it rolls off my tongue.
ajmilner
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2009 7:22:24 PM
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I've been coming across "amaneusis" lately.
kaliedel
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2009 7:56:06 PM
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I can't think of any new word off the top of my head, but in response to you taking the GRE, good luck. I took the GRE about four years ago, did fairly well, and was able to get into graduate school. I found it rather grueling, though - is the test still computerized?
Gil
Posted: Monday, March 16, 2009 9:15:29 PM
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Atrocious. Read today here. Martyrology. You may read also, if you want, the editorials of Gamesindustry.biz site (http://www.gamesindustry.biz), the Editor uses very well the English language, sometimes with unusual words - an example:

"When we think of videogames, there's an understandable tendency to think in fairly restricted terms about what constitutes a gaming device. Games consoles and PCs, of course, are videogame platforms, and more recently we've started to think of mobile phones (or smartphones, at least) as games devices.

However, beyond that rather limited sphere there's an extraordinary breadth of variety in the consumer electronics market. The average consumer is likely to possess a selection of gadgets and devices which all offer far more computing power than early videogame consoles did, but which are overlooked by all but a tiny minority of players in the games industry."
aldi09
Posted: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 8:13:43 AM
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I have met a word "nefarious" lately. It means extremely wicked or villainous; iniquitous.
Drew
Posted: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 10:04:47 AM
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I'm currently taking a graduate level news editing course, and we have pretty intense spelling and vocabulary quizzes at the beginning of every class session.

Desiccate, meaning to dry up, is a word that we are given every single week. I spelled it wrong the first five quizzes or so because I always want to put two S's in there.
NicoleR
Posted: Tuesday, March 17, 2009 3:00:10 PM
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Addax. This one comes up in crossword puzzles all the time, and yet I can never remember it. It's a type of Saharan antelope with long, spiraling horns.
Citiwoman
Posted: Wednesday, March 18, 2009 12:36:29 AM
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Here are a few: contiguity, driography, bezier, animatic, benday, burster, collotype.
Demosth
Posted: Wednesday, March 18, 2009 4:15:17 AM
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I like the word "philanthropist" as it is spelled exactly how it sounds, and it is used to describe people who like people. The dictionary probably lists it as someone who makes donations or does charity work. Though it now appears to be more commonly used when describing those among us who are "people persons".

For the longest time, I had been hearing this word without knowing the meaning. So if you have a hard time remembering, just think:

people person = philanthropist d'oh!
Marie
Posted: Wednesday, March 18, 2009 12:02:38 PM
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I had never heard of the word "capapie" until it was used in a crossword puzzle last weekend. Clue was "completely" or it means "from head to foot." I can't think of a way I could use this word in a sentence. Can you?
Joseph Glantz
Posted: Wednesday, March 18, 2009 5:59:45 PM
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Sesquipedalian is one of my favorites. Sesqui means one and a half. So a sesquicentennial would be 1.5 centuries ore 150 years. Ped is, I believe, Latin for foot. So sesquipedalian means measuring a foot and half. It's almost the perfect word since it's definition is also its attribute. A sesquipedalian word is a a real mouthful
krmiller
Posted: Wednesday, March 18, 2009 10:11:41 PM
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Marie wrote:
I had never heard of the word "capapie" until it was used in a crossword puzzle last weekend. Clue was "completely" or it means "from head to foot." I can't think of a way I could use this word in a sentence. Can you?


I've seen that phrase used in sentences, though I don't think I've ever used it. Outside of the lovely world of crossword puzzles, it's three words: "cap a pie" (or hyphenated, I think both are correct). And I think there's an accent mark of some sort over the middle "a" and possibly over the "e."
aldi09
Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2009 4:19:21 PM
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LUCULENT. It means something easily understood, clear or lucid.
catskincatskin
Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2009 6:13:55 PM
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I've got two that I've enjoyed for the past year or so:

Ru´ti`late
v. i. 1. To shine; to emit rays of light.

Thrap´ple
n. 1. Windpipe; throttle.

(copied and pasted these from The Free Dictionary)
Joseph Glantz
Posted: Sunday, March 22, 2009 9:37:44 AM
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I'm reminded of an old New Yorker cartoon in which an old man is sitting in his rocking chair, very depressed. His wife is talking to a friend. The wife remarks "Fred is very upset today. Today is the first day in his life he didn't learn something new."
prolixitysquared
Posted: Sunday, March 22, 2009 4:14:49 PM
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There are always words I'm not familiar with when I'm reading a new book. I always tell myself I'll make a note of them and check them out later, but it never happens.

My new habit is putting a post-it in the front of the book, and then when I find a new word, if a pen is handy, I write it down. So far I have a huge list growing in a book (Credit Card Nation) that I'm attempting to read, but it's challenging my attention span with its number-talk.

Here are some of the words from the list.

Nascent. Usury. Shoal. Insidious. Laud. Tripartite. Ignominious. Sinecure. Contravention. Improvident. Beleaguer. Knell.


Sometimes I list words that I think I understand meaning-wise for the most part, but I still like to get a more clear idea of exactly what their definitions are for the sake of knowing and so I will use them correctly in the future, if they ever suddenly start popping into my vocabulary repertoire.
Betsy D.
Posted: Monday, March 23, 2009 1:09:06 PM
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Rinkusu wrote:
...well...

There was some word I saw the other day that I'd never seen before. I forget what it was, but I believe it started with 'c'. And it meant something like 'an area for pedestrians only' or something. ...though maybe this is a more common word than I think, and we just never hear it out here in the rural areas..

I've also learned some words from friends that I'd never heard before that: 'inane' (love that word), 'innuendo', and 'lemon' as a slang word meaning 'crappy car'.

The last two English, non-video-game-related words to come up in a conversation with friends that I'd never heard before were 'nymphomania' and 'necrophiliac'. ...eh


Might that first one have been "crosswalk"?
Betsy D.
Posted: Monday, March 23, 2009 1:18:09 PM
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I came upon one today in my daily subscription to "A Word A Day" (great site/books for you logophiliacs out there) - it's:

hemidemisemiquaver - a sixty-fourth note

risadr
Posted: Tuesday, March 24, 2009 11:21:01 AM
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Betsy D. wrote:
I came upon one today in my daily subscription to "A Word A Day" (great site/books for you logophiliacs out there) - it's:

hemidemisemiquaver - a sixty-fourth note



I absolutely ADORE this word. So many of my friends who are also musicians don't even know it. That's when I get to rub their noses in the fact that they should have been paying attention in English classes, as well as music!
risadr
Posted: Tuesday, March 24, 2009 11:22:13 AM
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kaliedel wrote:
I can't think of any new word off the top of my head, but in response to you taking the GRE, good luck. I took the GRE about four years ago, did fairly well, and was able to get into graduate school. I found it rather grueling, though - is the test still computerized?


It is still computer based, and adaptive. I'm going to be taking it at the end of April, so I have some time to prepare, but I also have a toddler at home, which makes studying somewhat difficult, unless I wait until she's sleeping.
Galad
Posted: Tuesday, March 24, 2009 2:53:05 PM

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Medical:

Microkeratome - A hand held surgical instrument used to slice a thin layer of tissue off of the surface of your cornea. If you've had corrective laser surgery, chances are they used one in preparation.
kaliedel
Posted: Tuesday, March 24, 2009 3:30:28 PM
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risadr wrote:
It is still computer based, and adaptive. I'm going to be taking it at the end of April, so I have some time to prepare, but I also have a toddler at home, which makes studying somewhat difficult, unless I wait until she's sleeping.


I had a high anxiety level about it for months, but preparation helped me immensely. I'm not even that good at computerized tests, but I was able to score the highest grade of my incoming grad class (of course, it was only seven people, so maybe I shouldn't scream it from the mountaintops.)
Sarachan
Posted: Tuesday, March 24, 2009 3:30:39 PM
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There are lots of words you will come across in your GRE studies, but here is a piece of advice for the test that I wish someone would have told me: make sure to buy a study guide and BE POSITIVE that the edition you've bought is current to the test that is being given now. I bought a book that was only about a year old (thinking that I would save money and be smart) and found that it was significantly different from the test I took! d'oh! Yipes!
Luftmarque
Posted: Tuesday, March 24, 2009 4:58:05 PM

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I was just made aware of the word gormless used by an Australian poster on the Internet Movie Database board. Saw it in another place since, too.

I remember the English GRE fondly, there is an inevitable aspect of randomness to the thing--which particular unusual words they happen to present you with on a given day. Good luck!
Betsy D.
Posted: Thursday, March 26, 2009 12:05:17 PM
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I like this one: "sternutation" - a sneeze ACHOO!
arthbard
Posted: Thursday, March 26, 2009 11:54:56 PM
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I believe the last word I saw that I was entirely unfamiliar with was apiarist. It's another name for a beekeeper.
aldi09
Posted: Friday, March 27, 2009 2:40:35 AM
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CONVOLUTED. 1. Having numerous overlapping coils or folds: a convoluted seashell.
2. Intricate; complicated: convoluted legal language; convoluted reasoning.
aldi09
Posted: Saturday, March 28, 2009 1:56:05 AM
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This morning I met a word VITUPERATE which means to rebuke or criticize harshly or abusively; berate and use harshly abusive language; rail.

aldi09
Posted: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 1:33:51 AM
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SUCCINCT which means clearly expressed in a few words.
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