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Art...is merely the refuge which the ingenious have invented, when they were supplied with food and women, to escape the... Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, November 15, 2011 12:00:00 AM
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Art...is merely the refuge which the ingenious have invented, when they were supplied with food and women, to escape the tediousness of life.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965)
pRiNCeSsa
Posted: Tuesday, November 15, 2011 4:46:00 AM
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Location: piLipiNaS
aRt iS neveR m0Re appReCiaTed thaN wheN we aRe tiRed aNd b0Red aNd sad aNd L0w aNd aNgRy aNd juSt pLaiN miSeRabLe... eveN the cReaTi0N 0f aN aRtw0Rk seRveS the saMe puRp0Se t0 th0Se wh0 cReaTe iT... as whaT eiNsTeiN said, "the m0n0t0ny aNd s0LiTude 0f a quieT Life sTiMuLateS the cReaTive miNd."
pedro
Posted: Tuesday, November 15, 2011 4:50:53 AM
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[quote=Daemon Art...is merely the refuge which the ingenious have invented, when they were supplied with food and women, to escape the tediousness of life.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965)[/quote]


From someone who lived till the mid 1960's it's a pretty gender biased quote. I wonder how early in his life this was said. Kitten?
IMcRout
Posted: Tuesday, November 15, 2011 5:17:00 AM
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I hope / fear this is is once more one of those quotes completely out of context.
Otherwise I wouldn't give a fart her thought about it.
Kitten?
GabhSigenod
Posted: Tuesday, November 15, 2011 7:41:48 AM

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Today, he may be describing the Internet.
Rusty
Posted: Tuesday, November 15, 2011 7:42:31 AM
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I don't know, might be some truth in it. You won't appreciate Art if you hadn't eaten for the last three days and there was not a very healthy chance of eating in the next two. It is definately a leisure time activity and probably only as important as a leisure time activity ought to be. But that is just my point of view.
MTC
Posted: Tuesday, November 15, 2011 9:25:48 AM
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In answer to the question regarding the age of the author, Maughm who was born in 1874 was 51 years of age when Of Human Bondage was released in 1915. He may have penned the quotation earlier.
KAMRAMNA
Posted: Tuesday, November 15, 2011 11:15:34 AM
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Joined: 1/14/2011
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Location: United States
Hey people ... please don't get too excited about Somerset's words. Mr. M was only putting into words one of his observations at that time. His words as such are no longer valid. Just as many of our own comments on this subject may no longer be valid in, oh let's say, one hundred years. It could happen ...
kitten
Posted: Tuesday, November 15, 2011 1:01:58 PM
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Daemon wrote:
Art...is merely the refuge which the ingenious have invented, when they were supplied with food and women, to escape the tediousness of life.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965)



The quote comes from the book entitled, of Human Bondage--1915--Chapter 42. Philip is in Paris dining with two friends. Again we have, to me, a colourful description of how the meal is going and the thoughts put forth.

I think one needs to remember that, W. Somerset Maugham, lived through the period knows as the, Belle Époque and this novel was written when the, Great War had just started. Which abruptly brought and end to that period known as the, Belle Époque. Travelling abroad to broaden ones mind was not at the fore after the Great War.

His other wonderful novel, The Razor's Edge, although published in 1944 is set after the, Great War and that wonderful period known as the Belle Époque.



"What you're here for I don't know. It is no business of mine. But art is a luxury. Men attach importance only to self-preservation and the propagation of their species. It is only when these instincts are satisfied that they consent to occupy themselves with the entertainment which is provided for them by writers, painters, and poets."

Cronshaw stopped for a moment to drink. He had pondered for twenty years the problem whether he loved liquor because it made him talk or whether he loved conversation because it made him thirsty.

Then he said: "I wrote a poem yesterday."

Without being asked he began to recite it, very slowly, marking the rhythm with an extended forefinger. It was possibly a very fine poem, but at that moment a young woman came in. She had scarlet lips, and it was plain that the vivid colour of her cheeks was not due to the vulgarity of nature; she had blackened her eyelashes and eyebrows, and painted both eyelids a bold blue, which was continued to a triangle at the corner of the eyes. It was fantastic and amusing. Her dark hair was done over her ears in the fashion made popular by Mlle. Cleo de Merode. Philip's eyes wandered to her, and Cronshaw, having finished the recitation of his verses, smiled upon him indulgently.

"You were not listening," he said.

"Oh yes, I was."

"I do not blame you, for you have given an apt illustration of the statement I just made. What is art beside love? I respect and applaud your indifference to fine poetry when you can contemplate the meretricious charms of this young person."

She passed by the table at which they were sitting, and he took her arm.

"Come and sit by my side, dear child, and let us play the divine comedy of love."

"Fichez-moi la paix," she said, and pushing him on one side continued her perambulation.

"Art," he continued, with a wave of the hand, "is merely the refuge which the ingenious have invented, when they were supplied with food and women, to escape the tediousness of life."

Cronshaw filled his glass again, and began to talk at length. He spoke with rotund delivery. He chose his words carefully. He mingled wisdom and nonsense in the most astounding manner, gravely making fun of his hearers at one moment, and at the next playfully giving them sound advice. He talked of art, and literature, and life. He was by turns devout and obscene, merry and lachrymose. He grew remarkably drunk, and then he began to recite poetry, his own and Milton's, his own and Shelley's, his own and Kit Marlowe's.



Of Human Bondage--1915

Of Human Bondage--1934--the movie With Bette Davis and Leslie Howard.


Please thank TFD, http://www.classicreader.com to read at your leisue and youtube for the full length movie to watch at your leisure.


peace out, >^,,^<


jmacann
Posted: Tuesday, November 15, 2011 5:20:45 PM
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Rather contrived, I am afraid -could be just about anything.
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