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merve
Posted: Monday, November 14, 2011 4:42:21 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 8/4/2010
Posts: 71
Neurons: 209
Location: Istanbul
Instead of going to her hairdresser she may prefer to get on a bus to a strange festival in a godforsaken place."
This sentence doesn't sound good to me. How can I make it a proper sentence?
Should I say 1-"take a bus to a strange festival in a godosaken place"
or 2-"get on a bus to a godforsaken place for a strange festival"
Thank you
thar
Posted: Monday, November 14, 2011 4:52:52 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 25,239
Neurons: 102,441
if the actual action is to do something, then 'get on' is better than 'take'

you take a bus, it is talking about the means of transportation, you did not drive or fly.

you get on a bus, it is more active, it is you climbing onto a bus,

since here the point is instead of doing something passive (go to the hairdresser) they may make a decision to do something active (get on a bus), then in this instance it sounds better to me.

But it would probably not be noticed if the other phrasing was used.
srirr
Posted: Monday, November 14, 2011 5:01:44 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/29/2009
Posts: 8,507
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I am relating this to the place of discussion also. If I am standing at bus stop and trying to say something to my friend, I may say "Get on a bus...". however if it is just an ordinary instruction/ suggestion/ guidance, I would prefer to use "Take a bus..."

Say for example, I am instructing my guest on how to reach a specific place. As I am unable to escort them, I would say, "Take a bus."

IMcRout
Posted: Monday, November 14, 2011 8:25:12 AM
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Joined: 5/27/2011
Posts: 35,380
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Location: Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
I'd go to the hairdresser's. I don't trust those Turkish buses. Whistle
merve
Posted: Monday, November 14, 2011 11:23:00 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 8/4/2010
Posts: 71
Neurons: 209
Location: Istanbul
Thank you for all your help.
merve
Posted: Monday, November 14, 2011 11:29:28 AM
Rank: Member

Joined: 8/4/2010
Posts: 71
Neurons: 209
Location: Istanbul
IMcRout wrote:
I'd go to the hairdresser's. I don't trust those Turkish buses. Whistle

quote=IMcRout]I'd go to the hairdresser's. I don't trust those Turkish buses. Whistle [/quote]
Neither do I, because they are from Germany:)
IMcRout
Posted: Monday, November 14, 2011 1:03:38 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/27/2011
Posts: 35,380
Neurons: 563,379
Location: Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
You may have a point there, merve.
excaelis
Posted: Monday, November 14, 2011 1:24:34 PM

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Joined: 6/30/2010
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Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
I get the sense ( from contextual use ) that ' get on a bus to... ' seems to be used more often for longer trips, whereas ' take a bus to...' is more general. That could just be my perception, though.
leonAzul
Posted: Monday, November 14, 2011 3:47:12 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,589
Neurons: 31,166
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
merve wrote:
Instead of going to her hairdresser she may prefer to get on a bus to a strange festival in a godforsaken place."
This sentence doesn't sound good to me. How can I make it a proper sentence?
Should I say 1-"take a bus to a strange festival in a godosaken place"
or 2-"get on a bus to a godforsaken place for a strange festival"


Since the choice seems to be between two destinations, I would choose "take a bus".

I would also think twice about using the phrase "God forsaken" unless you are directly quoting an eighty year old who has had too much coffee and is a bit irritable. Thirty years ago it might have been considered edgy or rude; now it just sounds quaint, like polyester leisure suits.

Come to think of, those are pretty rude, too. Whistle
leonAzul
Posted: Monday, November 14, 2011 3:55:47 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,589
Neurons: 31,166
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
excaelis wrote:
I get the sense ( from contextual use ) that ' get on a bus to... ' seems to be used more often for longer trips, whereas ' take a bus to...' is more general. That could just be my perception, though.


Around here, I have gotten a different sense. It means literally to board a bus, and figuratively to join a group of like-minded people, as in, "He got on the 'Free Darfur' bus and rode it all the way to the UN."
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