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It’s been wrong Options
jagh55
Posted: Friday, July 3, 2009 1:46:31 AM
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Joined: 6/26/2009
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It's been wrong

I don't understand the sentence. Pray If it was -It was wrong- then I'd understand. But it is written IT'S BEEN wrong and I'm totally confused. I am a french Canadian and I can't find an equivalent in french. Thanks for your help. It's a question about verbs so I thougt I'd put it on the english grammar forum.

And also, what's the difference between A question about--- and A question on--- For exemple: I have a question about/on/for the homework.
ThanksAnxious
Oh and alsoBrick wall what does -You got me going on- mean ?
A lot of questions I knowd'oh! d'oh!
TYSON
Posted: Friday, July 3, 2009 2:16:58 AM
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The use of the word BEEN would imply (to me at least) that it had since been corrected.
Example: "It had BEEN wrong in the past but the author has since corrected the error."

As for the question about/on/for.
In context of the homework, "I have a question ABOUT the homework" means there is something literrally in the homework you wish to understand more.

"A question ON the homework" could be the same as ABOUT, however could also mean you could be referring to a particular question written in the homework.
Example: 'Excuse me, I have a question ON the homework that I am not able to solve'


"A question FOR the homework" FOR is to whom or what the question would be presented. In this context, you could be creating the homework for the students and writing the questions down for them. If it were in the context of a person "I have a question FOR the teacher" is that you mean to present a question to the teacher, or in other words, to ask the teacher something.
Example: "Pardon me, why did you give me so much homework?"

Can anyone else better explain the subtle differences?

johnw
Posted: Friday, July 3, 2009 8:54:50 AM
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It's (always) been wrong to lie, we assumed, when testifying in court, but something changed, and now it's standard practice ...

Adding >always< seems to make it more palatable.
Luftmarque
Posted: Friday, July 3, 2009 9:19:10 AM

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jagh55 wrote:
It's been wrong
I don't understand the sentence. Pray If it was -It was wrong- then I'd understand. But it is written IT'S BEEN wrong and I'm totally confused.

Expanding the contraction we get "It has been wrong." As johnw mentioned, adding "always" makes this a happier sentence "It's always been wrong." And the sentence seems incomplete as is, unless it's part of an exchange:
―So, you're saying that spending government money on your mistress is wrong?
―It's been wrong for years!
It's not really a good sentence in any case, I would rewrite and eliminate the contraction altogether.


jagh55 wrote:
Oh and alsoBrick wall what does -You got me going on- mean ?
A lot of questions I knowd'oh! d'oh!

I haven't heard "you got me going on" but "you got me going" usually means "you said or did something that got me angry or upset."
early_apex
Posted: Friday, July 3, 2009 11:08:08 AM
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I could point to my wall clock and say, "It's been wrong since the battery went dead." But I would have to immediately add, "However, it is right twice a day."
alvrez
Posted: Friday, July 3, 2009 11:22:27 AM
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"It's been wrong" or It has been wrong implies that the error is past. It may be correct now but it has been wrong. Adding "always" may change the intent of the phrase.
Luftmarque
Posted: Friday, July 3, 2009 12:23:39 PM

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alvrez wrote:
"It's been wrong" or It has been wrong implies that the error is past. It may be correct now but it has been wrong. Adding "always" may change the intent of the phrase.

That's right, but seen more often as "He's been wrong before" or "They've been wrong before" to cast some doubt on a current opinion or decision.
Can top
Posted: Sunday, August 9, 2009 12:31:42 PM
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alvrez wrote:
"It's been wrong" or It has been wrong implies that the error is past. It may be correct now but it has been wrong. Adding "always" may change the intent of the phrase.


Adding any number of words can change the intent, so I don't quite understand how it can be said that it implies a past, a finished action/event.
bugdoctor
Posted: Sunday, August 9, 2009 1:18:17 PM
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alvrez wrote:
"It's been wrong" or It has been wrong implies that the error is past. It may be correct now but it has been wrong. Adding "always" may change the intent of the phrase.


It may still be wrong.

"It's been wrong since the beginning for the company to fire employees on anonymous accusation alone, and it's still wrong. There should be proof."
Can top
Posted: Sunday, August 9, 2009 4:29:39 PM
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Location: Canada
jagh55 wrote:
It's been wrong

I don't understand the sentence. Pray If it was -It was wrong- then I'd understand. But it is written IT'S BEEN wrong and I'm totally confused. I am a french Canadian and I can't find an equivalent in french. Thanks for your help. It's a question about verbs so I thougt I'd put it on the english grammar forum.



You have to understand that the present perfect does a number of grammatical jobs in English, Jagh.

It's been = It has been

Using the present perfect means that there is always a connection to "now", "to the present", even when the present perfect denotes a finishes action, for example,

I have finished my homework = I've finished my homework = I finished my homework

The finishing of the homework may have been quite some time in the past, for example, a week ago. We use the present perfect to remark on such a "distant" past event to make that finished action important/current to "now". An example might help.

[Imagine that some students are given summer homework in June. Being students, many leave it to the last moment. So now it's August, and the students are talking about it.

A: Have you done your homework yet? Did you do your homework yet? [speaker choice, more on this later]

B: [who did his in early July] I've done my homework.

C: [homework not done] I haven't done mine yet.

D: I've never done any homework.

C is using the present perfect of continuation,--> the state of non-completion has extended from day 1 to the present.

B is using the present perfect of importance/current relevance. He could have used the simple past;

"I did my homework"

but, again, speaker choice, he has elected to make it seem more important I've done my homework" or he just is making note of the finished action's relevance to the situation being discussed.

D is using the present perfect of experience, stating that in his life he has never done any homework.

The present perfect of importance/current relevance is probably the hardest to get a handle on/understand because it's used quite differently for BrE and NaE. BrE uses the PP routinely for past events while in NaE, we have a choice, use it to highlight a past event or not, totally speaker choice. What one person may choose to highlight and use the PP, another may choose to not highlight and use the simple past.

If you've been thinking about this/If you thought about this and you have any more questions, please feel free to ask.
Can top
Posted: Sunday, August 9, 2009 4:40:49 PM
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Joined: 8/5/2009
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Location: Canada
jagh55 wrote:
It's been wrong

I don't understand the sentence. If it was -It was wrong- then I'd understand. But it is written IT'S BEEN wrong and I'm totally confused. I am a french Canadian and I can't find an equivalent in french. Thanks for your help. It's a question about verbs so I thougt I'd put it on the english grammar forum.
====================================

Now let's look specifically at your example.

I think others have covered this and I may be repeating but...

"It was wrong" focuses on a single event. Imagine I punched a mutual friend and you tell me,

It was wrong to do that.

"It's been wrong" focuses on a length of time ending with the present moment, the "now" present in our discussion. I'm not suggesting that it has finished, it very well may continue on into the future - with this collocation, it seems that it is a continuing event. More later.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, August 9, 2009 10:18:20 PM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Can Top: -
"The present perfect of importance/current relevance is probably the hardest to get a handle on/understand because it's used quite differently for BrE and NaE."

Thank you. With that one sentence you have satisfactorily explained for me a subtle difference in speech patterns between my American friends/colleagues and others. While it is so easy to identify lexical differences, sometimes it is these small distinctions that give a difference to speech patterns that's hard to pin down. So there's another adequately flagged.
Can top
Posted: Monday, August 10, 2009 1:07:33 AM
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Joined: 8/5/2009
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Location: Canada
Romany wrote:
Can Top: -
"The present perfect of importance/current relevance is probably the hardest to get a handle on/understand because it's used quite differently for BrE and NaE."

Thank you. With that one sentence you have satisfactorily explained for me a subtle difference in speech patterns between my American friends/colleagues and others. While it is so easy to identify lexical differences, sometimes it is these small distinctions that give a difference to speech patterns that's hard to pin down. So there's another adequately flagged.


Glad I could help, Romany. Cheers.
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