mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
an expression for "using bad grammar" Options
Minnah
Posted: Wednesday, November 2, 2011 3:19:48 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 6/29/2011
Posts: 8
Neurons: 3,445
Hey, guys! I was wondering if there was an expression or an idiom in English meaning "to make grammatical errors" or "to use a wrong grammatical case" . Any help is appreciated.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, November 2, 2011 3:32:28 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,427
Neurons: 228,163
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi Minnah!

I was thinking I could invent a word (like 'dysgrammarosis') Whistle , but then found a note in 'Related Words' under the definition of 'grammar'

bagrammatism
Medicine. a neurological defect resulting in an inability to use words in grammatical sequence.


Will that do? Dancing
nowherenothere
Posted: Wednesday, November 2, 2011 5:14:36 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/15/2011
Posts: 774
Neurons: 2,096
Location: Earth
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi Minnah!

I was thinking I could invent a word (like 'dysgrammarosis') Whistle , but then found a note in 'Related Words' under the definition of 'grammar'

bagrammatism
Medicine. a neurological defect resulting in an inability to use words in grammatical sequence.


Will that do? Dancing


Well done, DragOnspeaker. That's a term used to describe symptoms of a true medical condition. So is agrammatism and related apraxia or aphasia.

What about those simply learning another language who haven't yet mastered basic grammar? Student?

For the purely ignorant or moronic maybe something similar to liguistically challenged and grammitcally retarded due to a severe case of endocephaloproctosis, perhaps chronic or acute ignoranalimoronicagrammaticendocephaloproctosisitis? The term 'stupid' probably sums it up.



asornunez
Posted: Wednesday, November 2, 2011 9:42:11 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 11/2/2011
Posts: 7
Neurons: 21
Location: Venezuela
Yes.. (without "wanting" to seem ofensive) stupid or retarded is a perfect word to describe him!
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, November 2, 2011 11:41:30 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 17,718
Neurons: 57,415
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
asornunez -

who is the 'him' you are referring to? If you are referring to a specific person whom you know then you know more about 'him' than we do and so you might want to insult him by calling him stupid or retarded for reasons of your own. We, not knowing who this 'him' is, might be more inclined to use words like uneducated, marginalised - or even poor.

If, however, you had no-one specifically in mind but wanted to label all people who make mistakes in such a way, then the grammar you have used is neither clear or correct - it is, in fact, the opposite of 'good', so your label might be said to come back and bite you!

This would, for me, be a perfect example of why it would not be such a good idea to label everyone who is less than perfect with cruel names.

Minnah - I don't think you'll find a word that encompasses all you are looking for. There are certain words which refer to certain aspects of grammatical mistakes. But English grammar is so difficult to get one's head around; and there are so many traps people walk into, that I think it's usual to just confess that one's grammar is an area of concern, or needs more tweaking.

If you're looking for a word to describe yourself because you think this is your weakest area, then DON'T! If you're taking on the huge task of learning English then the kinds of words to use are 'brave', 'clever', 'dedicated', or, 'smarter than the average bear'! (This refers to a cartoon character from an English-language cartoon popular many years ago.)
almostfreebird
Posted: Thursday, November 3, 2011 12:10:50 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/22/2011
Posts: 2,812
Neurons: 7,024
Location: Japan
Romany wrote:

or needs more tweaking.




You mean crystal methamphetamine?


Romany
Posted: Thursday, November 3, 2011 12:15:57 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 17,718
Neurons: 57,415
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Nah, then I think the better word would be 'peaking'!
Briton
Posted: Thursday, November 3, 2011 8:48:54 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/13/2011
Posts: 5,107
Neurons: 16,440

Minnah, I would just say that something is grammatically incorrect, or has grammatical errors.

Otherwise, "to make grammatical errors" is perfectly fine.

"I make grammatical errors."
"I am making grammatical errors."
"I have made grammatical errors." etc.

While not grammatically correct, it is often said "I am always making grammatical errors."
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, November 3, 2011 10:57:37 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 43,131
Neurons: 595,331
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
You can say "I'm a lousy writer" or "He's sloppy with the grammar."
excaelis
Posted: Thursday, November 3, 2011 5:22:54 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/30/2010
Posts: 10,965
Neurons: 32,652
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Journalism.

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, November 4, 2011 3:40:48 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 34,427
Neurons: 228,163
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
excaelis wrote:

Quote:
Journalism.


Perfect! Applause
Shivanand
Posted: Friday, November 4, 2011 5:21:37 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/2/2011
Posts: 7,902
Neurons: 229,316
Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Bad English is referred to by different names by different ethinicities! Ebonics is the slang english spoken by African Americans. Similarly it is called Butler English amongst Anglo-Indians! May be many more such names might exist for bad english!

Cheers!
Ray41
Posted: Friday, November 4, 2011 6:47:09 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/9/2010
Posts: 1,937
Neurons: 45,980
Location: Orange, New South Wales, Australia
You could say they are linguistically challenged,Think

This would mean that their grammar could be 'bad' in which ever language they choose.Whistle

As for an 'idiom' to describe 'bad grammar', well;

An idiom is an expression, word, or phrase whose sense means something different from what the words literally imply. The idiom "beating around the bush" means to hint or discuss obliquely; nobody is literally beating any person or thing, and the bush is a metaphor. When a speaker uses an idiom, the listener might mistake its actual meaning, if he or she has not heard this figure of speech before.Idioms usually do not translate well; in some cases, when an idiom is translated into another language, either its meaning is changed or it is meaningless.
jmacann
Posted: Saturday, November 5, 2011 10:50:30 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/20/2011
Posts: 1,296
Neurons: 3,887
Location: Spain
I would stick to using "ungrammatical" -and ex mentioned a case in point.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Saturday, November 5, 2011 10:54:14 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 43,131
Neurons: 595,331
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Or ill-formed
jmacann
Posted: Saturday, November 5, 2011 1:39:11 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/20/2011
Posts: 1,296
Neurons: 3,887
Location: Spain
For granted.
Minnah
Posted: Sunday, November 6, 2011 1:39:09 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 6/29/2011
Posts: 8
Neurons: 3,445
Thank you guys! Your posts have been really helpful! Angel
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.