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Is this something you say in reply to thanks? Options
learner
Posted: Monday, June 29, 2009 12:01:50 AM
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What is the meaning of "I am glad to be of help" and when does it used?

Learner
Quester
Posted: Monday, June 29, 2009 3:32:24 AM
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Well it simply means that the person will get pleasure or happiness, if he/she can help or will help the other person in need. It could be use in situations where you want to offer help to other person if you will find that he/she in some kind of need and you can have sources or capability to help him/her.

Hope this explanation would help you to understand.
Terri DC
Posted: Monday, June 29, 2009 5:31:25 AM
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Yes, often people say that (or something similar) in reply to "Thanks".

Christine
Posted: Monday, June 29, 2009 7:06:47 AM
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It is used by a person who helped you.
Winston Smith
Posted: Monday, June 29, 2009 7:30:19 AM
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In Australia, we say "my pleasure" or "you are welcome" or "no worries"
bugdoctor
Posted: Monday, June 29, 2009 7:39:56 AM
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Here in the U.S., when I have someone reply to my 'thank you' with 'you're welcome', I'm actually surprised. In today's environment, it seems the regular response is 'no problem'.

I guess I'm old fashioned, because I find 'you're welcome' to be much more polite.
learner
Posted: Monday, June 29, 2009 8:39:28 AM
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Thanks everyone. I truly appreciate your replies :) Some people around me say that I have a very good command over English, but my biggest problem is "lack of confidence". It troubles me all the time even writing simple sentences in public.
early_apex
Posted: Monday, June 29, 2009 9:21:36 AM
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bugdoctor wrote:
Here in the U.S., when I have someone reply to my 'thank you' with 'you're welcome', I'm actually surprised. In today's environment, it seems the regular response is 'no problem'.

I guess I'm old fashioned, because I find 'you're welcome' to be much more polite.


I agree. Saying "You're welcome" is a good way to throw people off these days.
learner
Posted: Monday, June 29, 2009 10:03:07 AM
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Thanks early_apex :)
Epiphileon
Posted: Monday, June 29, 2009 11:03:05 AM

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learner wrote:


What is the meaning of "I am glad to be of help" and when does it used?

Learner


Learner, there are still people in the world for whom it is a fulfilling, and therefore a happy thing to assist someone in need.
I would also propose that "welcome" was an unfortunate compounding of two words, and in fact I seldom use it when expressing appreciation in writing.
I prefer you are well come, as in it is a well thing that you came to me for this. I'm probably stretching an archaic usage; however, I think that some archaic usages are more communicative.
I also prefer the two words for greeting people who are visiting me, as I think that "well" is some kind of shared phenomenon in some way. This is largely something I thought up on my own though, so I'd be interested in what others think about it.

learner
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 7:36:26 AM
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Thanks heaps, Epiphileon!
early_apex
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 8:12:30 AM
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learner wrote:
Thanks early_apex :)


You are more than welcome. :-D
fred
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 9:18:19 AM
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I don't like, "No problem".

I use, "You're welcome".
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 1:05:32 PM
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Winston mentioned "no worries" which I find truly heartwarming when said to me. I also like "You're right" which is not so common these days - but you really have to be Australian to pull it off. More formally, I like "Not at all". To me, "You're welcome" often sounds like the insincere phatic statements used by check-out attendants.
grammargeek
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 1:25:30 PM
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Epiphileon wrote:
learner wrote:


What is the meaning of "I am glad to be of help" and when does it used?

Learner


Learner, there are still people in the world for whom it is a fulfilling, and therefore a happy thing to assist someone in need.
I would also propose that "welcome" was an unfortunate compounding of two words, and in fact I seldom use it when expressing appreciation in writing.
I prefer you are well come, as in it is a well thing that you came to me for this. I'm probably stretching an archaic usage; however, I think that some archaic usages are more communicative.
I also prefer the two words for greeting people who are visiting me, as I think that "well" is some kind of shared phenomenon in some way. This is largely something I thought up on my own though, so I'd be interested in what others think about it.



Does anyone know if the word "welcome" actually was derived from the combination of "well" and "come"? I had never thought about that before. Epiphileon's explanation was interesting, but I am still wondering how one can have a "well thing" (unless it's that thing you can get water from). Wouldn't it be more grammatically correct to say it's a "good thing"?

Technicalities aside, I get the gist of what Epiphileon is saying. I just can't run with it. And Learner, stick with saying and writing, "You're welcome." If you write it as "You are well come," most people will see that as an error in your written English.


fred
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 2:00:06 PM
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Romany wrote:
"You're welcome" often sounds like the insincere phatic statements used by check-out attendants.


It's all in the delivery, as it should be.
Luftmarque
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 2:12:52 PM

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fred wrote:
I don't like, "No problem".
I use, "You're welcome".

No problem is a little presumptive and condescending I think. Reminds me of a salesman's response to my question about whether they stocked the "Howl's Moving Castle" DVD. Which was, "We don't stock it, OK?" Am I expected to agree that this is a good thing? Well, actually, no, it's not "OK." A little bit of apology, sense of customer service would have been nice. Which reminded me, in turn, of Rochester NY, the rudest little city in America, where, if a store didn't have something you wanted, say, a bakery for the store and a muffin for the item, the sales staff would typically look at you like you had two heads and it was clearly your problem for not knowing what they sell. And another thing! Rochester was the only place I've ever been where a lot of stores (music, books) would deliberately stock items by manufacturer or publisher rather than say, oh, I don't know, how about genre?!? What is wrong with people!!!!
[/rant]
fred
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 3:12:26 PM
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Luftmarque wrote:
fred wrote:
I don't like, "No problem".
I use, "You're welcome".

No problem is a little presumptive and condescending I think. Reminds me of a salesman's response to my question about whether they stocked the "Howl's Moving Castle" DVD. Which was, "We don't stock it, OK?" Am I expected to agree that this is a good thing? Well, actually, no, it's not "OK." A little bit of apology, sense of customer service would have been nice. Which reminded me, in turn, of Rochester NY, the rudest little city in America, where, if a store didn't have something you wanted, say, a bakery for the store and a muffin for the item, the sales staff would typically look at you like you had two heads and it was clearly your problem for not knowing what they sell. And another thing! Rochester was the only place I've ever been where a lot of stores (music, books) would deliberately stock items by manufacturer or publisher rather than say, oh, I don't know, how about genre?!? What is wrong with people!!!!
[/rant]


Unbelievable.

I'm looking for Frank Sinatra cds section.
Ok, sir, would that be on the Columbia or Reprise label?
What?
Luftmarque
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 3:27:27 PM

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fred wrote:
Luftmarque wrote:
And another thing! Rochester was the only place I've ever been where a lot of stores (music, books) would deliberately stock items by manufacturer or publisher rather than say, oh, I don't know, how about genre?!? What is wrong with people!!!!
Unbelievable.
I'm looking for Frank Sinatra CDs section.
OK, sir, would that be on the Columbia or Reprise label?
What?

Exactly! And then you'd have to accept being walked around the store by some salesperson you didn't really want to get to know, or to have asking you inane questions about Frank Sinatra. Totally kills the joy of browsing. They could only get away with it because there was a lack of competition. I suppose it must have made restocking a lot easier! I can only hope things have improved. One place where I would be in favor of national chain stores moving in to displace the locals.
Raparee
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 3:38:36 PM

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Oddly, this just struck me as I use some version daily. I use quite a few variations on a theme for "you're welcome." Obviously, I use that, but it's more for formal and business situations. In a more relaxed atmosphere, I will use "No problem," "Sure/sure thing," "Gladly," "No worries," "Anytime," etc. There are quite a few words to convey the general feeling and that lend themselves to the overall feel of the situation in particular, be it more professional or more friendly and light-hearted.
fred
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 3:43:54 PM
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Raparee wrote:
Oddly, this just struck me as I use some version daily. I use quite a few variations on a theme for "you're welcome." Obviously, I use that, but it's more for formal and business situations. In a more relaxed atmosphere, I will use "No problem," "Sure/sure thing," "Gladly," "No worries," "Anytime," etc. There are quite a few words to convey the general feeling and that lend themselves to the overall feel of the situation in particular, be it more professional or more friendly and light-hearted.


No Problem implies the possibility of a problem. How about a response with no negative possibilities... My pleasure, Anytime, instead of "Ya, you're lucky you caught me in a good mood or I might have robbed ya".
Raparee
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 3:54:41 PM

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fred wrote:
Raparee wrote:
Oddly, this just struck me as I use some version daily. I use quite a few variations on a theme for "you're welcome." Obviously, I use that, but it's more for formal and business situations. In a more relaxed atmosphere, I will use "No problem," "Sure/sure thing," "Gladly," "No worries," "Anytime," etc. There are quite a few words to convey the general feeling and that lend themselves to the overall feel of the situation in particular, be it more professional or more friendly and light-hearted.


No Problem implies the possibility of a problem. How about a response with no negative possibilities... My pleasure, Anytime, instead of "Ya, you're lucky you caught me in a good mood or I might have robbed ya".

I do use "Anytime" and "My pleasure," actually. ;) I guess I use "No problem" as a shortened form of "it wasn't a problem <to do whatever resulted in being thanked>."

As for the "you're lucky you caught me in a good mood" option...well, I can convey that particular vibe regardless of what I say. It's not always what you say, but how you say it. Just like when a certain someone(s) in the non-home-type place goes around and says, "Good morning," and it couldn't be more snide and full of snake oil if it tried. Feh.
Winston Smith
Posted: Tuesday, June 30, 2009 9:25:51 PM
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Romany wrote:
Winston mentioned "no worries" which I find truly heartwarming when said to me. I also like "You're right" which is not so common these days - but you really have to be Australian to pull it off. More formally, I like "Not at all". To me, "You're welcome" often sounds like the insincere phatic statements used by check-out attendants.

You are right, it is all in the intonation. "you are right" I have never heard it used as a response to "Thanks". We also use "my pleasure" in Australia.
What is insincere but they are ordered to say it is "How are you today?" by checkout operators. I hate it. I let my wife answer them.

The "quote" tags don't work!!! Can the Administration fix this problem, as it mixes posts unless you separate them with a line or 'bold' them and 'italic' them
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, July 1, 2009 2:19:59 AM
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Grammargeek: Yes, "Well come" was indeed used and written as two words once - as "Well done" is. Well come was the common greeting to visitors to one's home/town/city etc. while "Well met" was used to friends or acquaintances encountered in a public space. The opposite of "Well met" was "Ill met" (famously "Ill met by moonlight, Proud Titania" from A Midsummer Night's Dream) but, the rules of hospitality did not give rise to a corresponding "Ill come"!

Winston S. Perhaps you have not spent much time out in the country in Oz? And no: it's not "You ARE right". As mentioned above, its all in the delivery and a lazily drawled "Nah, yer right, luv" from an older Australian is, to me, a reassurance that whether it was rescuing my car from a creek, putting me up for the night or picking up a dropped book, whatever was done that I was thanking the person for didn't cause them the slightest bit of trouble.

As to the "How are YOU today?" thing. I often, just amuse myself, respond with "Suicidal" or "I'll be fine after I've just ax-murdered the boss" and I still get that blankly bright "That's good!" - which promptly sends me off into a fit of giggles.
Winston Smith
Posted: Wednesday, July 1, 2009 3:39:50 AM
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Well, I suppose I haven't been in the bush often enough. I have heard the "you are right" but in another context.
"how are you?" has become universal. I never use it, just "hello" is all I say. They use it a lot in Germany, but not on strangers, "Wie gehts?"
I used it all the time.

Shakespeare? hmmm that archaic English just kills me. Did they really talk like that?

Joseph Glantz
Posted: Wednesday, July 1, 2009 6:53:30 AM
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Don't mention it.
risadr
Posted: Wednesday, July 1, 2009 10:43:17 AM
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bugdoctor wrote:
Here in the U.S., when I have someone reply to my 'thank you' with 'you're welcome', I'm actually surprised. In today's environment, it seems the regular response is 'no problem'.

I guess I'm old fashioned, because I find 'you're welcome' to be much more polite.


My husband and I have already taught our (not even two year old) daughter that the appropriate thing to say when you want something is "please," when someone gives you something or does something for you "thank you," and when someone thanks you for something one should say "you're welcome."

I agree with you that it's much more polite than the (seemingly) customary "no problem." I would also find "happy (or glad) to of help" appropriate, depending on the circumstances.
fred
Posted: Wednesday, July 1, 2009 11:03:48 AM
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risadr wrote:
bugdoctor wrote:
Here in the U.S., when I have someone reply to my 'thank you' with 'you're welcome', I'm actually surprised. In today's environment, it seems the regular response is 'no problem'.

I guess I'm old fashioned, because I find 'you're welcome' to be much more polite.


My husband and I have already taught our (not even two year old) daughter that the appropriate thing to say when you want something is "please," when someone gives you something or does something for you "thank you," and when someone thanks you for something one should say "you're welcome."

I agree with you that it's much more polite than the (seemingly) customary "no problem." I would also find "happy (or glad) to of help" appropriate, depending on the circumstances.


Agreed. If someone is polite enough to say "Thank You" the only answer in my book is "You Are Welcome".
grammargeek
Posted: Wednesday, July 1, 2009 1:48:51 PM
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Romany wrote:
Grammargeek: Yes, "Well come" was indeed used and written as two words once - as "Well done" is. Well come was the common greeting to visitors to one's home/town/city etc. while "Well met" was used to friends or acquaintances encountered in a public space. The opposite of "Well met" was "Ill met" (famously "Ill met by moonlight, Proud Titania" from A Midsummer Night's Dream) but, the rules of hospitality did not give rise to a corresponding "Ill come"!


Thank you, Romany!
Romany
Posted: Thursday, July 2, 2009 12:47:36 AM
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Ahh, yer right, luv.
learner
Posted: Thursday, July 2, 2009 7:03:00 AM
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You guys are awesome! Now I've got so much information on this subject.

Learner
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