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Ivan Fadeev
Posted: Wednesday, November 24, 2021 12:04:54 PM

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Joined: 2/21/2015
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Do you read "t" in "debuted"?

She debuted in 2000.
sureshot
Posted: Wednesday, November 24, 2021 12:46:25 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2015
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Ivan Fadeev wrote:
Do you read "t" in "debuted"?

She debuted in 2000.

________________

An interesting word. The following link is helpful to know the correct pronunciation.


https://youtu.be/g5RgmPFj87w
FounDit
Posted: Wednesday, November 24, 2021 1:21:59 PM

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Joined: 9/19/2011
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The French have an interesting language. It seems they have a complete alphabet, but don't pronounce have of it...Whistle

One oddity occurred to me just the other day - the word "Beau". Pronounced as "Bo", it can mean a suitor for a lady.

Then we have Beau Geste, (Bo-Jest) the movie.

Or, beaucoup, (Bo-Ku) meaning a great amount.

But then we come to "beautiful" (B-yu-ti-ful), which seems like it should be "Bo-ti-ful", but isn't. It's very confusing, n'est-ce pas? (nest pawh)

(Just kidding around. Don't take this as in insult to the French or their language. We've borrowed all these words into our language. And English has it's own weird ways)
thar
Posted: Wednesday, November 24, 2021 1:25:38 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
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No.
French début, - pronounced day-bu. (edit, correction BrE includes a y- sound day - byu)

Borrowed into English as a noun 'debut' .
Verb the same.

Past tense for a verb ending in a vowel sound = vowel sound +d
This year I debut (day-byue)
Last year I debuted (day-byood /day-byude)
Only the sound in each case is a lighter and shorter u, more French than the English oo sound.


Since the word ends in a t you add -ed to the spelling.
But since the t is silent you only add - d to the sound.


There are other words where the t is no longer silent, such as debutante. But that is as in French.


(I was going to add a simple example to show the pattern of +d in English. And I thought I would pick an oo sound.
Not pee, peed. Something ending in an -oo sound. There must be loads.
Grow, grew.
Do, did.
This could be harder than I thought!

Moo, mooed?
Finally -
Sue, sued.... Glue, glued, imbue, imbued, rue, rued, queue, queued.
Hew, hewed; mew, mewed, crew, crewed. Renew, renewed.
View, viewed,
Boo, booed, coo, cooed, woo wooed.
You have to have an - ed in that pattern because wood is a different sound from woo-ed.
Whereas mood and mooed are the same sound.
Bloody English. Whistle

I think all that proves is that -oo or -u is not a common ending for the present tense of verbs in English! Edit - quite a few once I hit that -ue seam.

But the pattern of adding -d is a very clear way of signalling in English that it is a past tense. Even though there are many ways of creating the past tense, that is a clear and common one and is the one used when forming verbs from new, made-up, foreign or borrowed words.


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