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Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, November 24, 2021 12:00:00 AM
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whet

(verb) To make more keen; stimulate.

Synonyms: quicken, pique

Usage: The aroma of frying bacon whetted my appetite.
lazarius
Posted: Wednesday, November 24, 2021 12:15:27 AM

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Daemon wrote:


Quote:
A meagre repast it is; but their appetites are now on keen edge, all the keener from the supply of food being stinted. For by one of nature's perverse contrarieties, men feel hunger most when without the means of satisfying it, and most thirsty when no water can be had. It is the old story of distant skies looking brightest, and far-off fields showing greenest - the very difficulty of obtaining a thing whetting the desire to possess it, as a child craves some toy, that it soon ceases to care for when once in its possession.

-
The Land of Fire, by Mayne Reid

-
Mehrdad77
Posted: Wednesday, November 24, 2021 1:57:23 AM

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whet (v.)
Old English hwettan "to whet, sharpen," figuratively "incite, encourage," from Proto-Germanic *hwatjan (source also of Old Norse hvetja "to sharpen, encourage," Middle Low German, Middle Dutch wetten, Old High German wezzan, German wetzen "to sharpen," Gothic ga-hvatjan "to sharpen, incite"), from PIE root *kwed- "to sharpen" (source also of Sanskrit codati "incites," literally "sharpens;" Old English hwæt "brave, bold," Old Saxon hwat "sharp").
Mehrdad77
Posted: Wednesday, November 24, 2021 1:58:14 AM

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To whet is to sharpen. You could whet a knife's blade with a whetting stone, or you could whet your appetite by having some Doritos.

Mehrdad77
Posted: Wednesday, November 24, 2021 2:05:38 AM

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The verb whet can mean "to stimulate or make more acute," and the word is often used in the phrase "whet [your] appetite," which can be used literally or figuratively. You could serve light appetizers to whet everyone's appetite for dinner or you could whet an actor's appetite by giving him a small role that inspires him for greater roles. You can whet other things in this sense as well — such as curiosity, fear, or pleasure.

thar
Posted: Wednesday, November 24, 2021 4:32:56 AM

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whetstone -

Emel Rapchan
Posted: Wednesday, November 24, 2021 5:04:06 AM

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Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Wednesday, November 24, 2021 7:10:50 AM

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"Our minds are like our stomachs; they are whetted by the change of their food, and variety supplies both with fresh appetites."


John Quinton
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, November 24, 2021 11:06:11 AM

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Irma Crespo
Posted: Thursday, November 25, 2021 1:36:13 AM

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Whet - To make more keen; stimulate
thar
Posted: Thursday, November 25, 2021 1:55:09 AM

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I dont know what the pronunciation guides say, but the h is not silent. Whet is not exactly the same as wet.

There is a pursed-lips air-blow h in there.

In English the spelling is confusing because it has changed from hw- to wh- in words like where, whistle, whet.
In Icelandic (which is much more phonetic) they are still spelt hv-.
hvert, hvissa, hvetja.

Icelandic hvetja, to sharpen
Quote:
From Old Norse hvetja, from Proto-Germanic *hwatjaną.
IPA(key): /ˈxʷɛːtja/
Verb
hvetja (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative hvatti, supine hvatt)

(transitive, governs the accusative) to sharpen, whet (a blade, etc.)
(transitive, governs the accusative) to encourage
(transitive, governs the accusative) to catalyze; (to bring about the catalysis of a chemical reaction)


Quote:
hvetja v (acc) (hvatti, hvatt)

1. (eggja) encourage, urge
~ e-n til e-s urge sby to do sth
2. (brýna) whet, sharpen


Thinking of it as "hwet" rather than "whet" nakes the pronounciation in English make much more sense.
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