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Koh Elaine
Posted: Sunday, October 24, 2021 4:12:07 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 7,486
Neurons: 32,625
Two years have passed since local star Aloysius Pang has passed on but he still lingers in his girlfriend’s life.

Should it be "passed on" instead?

Thanks.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Sunday, October 24, 2021 4:46:34 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 3,055
Neurons: 19,447
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Koh Elaine wrote:
Two years have passed since local star Aloysius Pang has passed on but he still lingers in his girlfriend’s life.

Should it be "passed on" instead?

Thanks.


It you mean the first “passed”, no it shouldn’t.
Passed on in this context has a particular meaning, to have died the first “passed” is to indicate the passage of time has occurred 2 years.
Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Sunday, October 24, 2021 7:59:37 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/4/2015
Posts: 6,369
Neurons: 1,382,661
Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
"Passed on" is an idiom. Please read the description for that in the idioms section of TFD.
Balcácer
Posted: Sunday, October 24, 2021 8:43:22 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 9/14/2021
Posts: 20
Neurons: 28,400
Location: Santiago de los Caballeros, Santiago, Dominican Re
Boo hoo!

Good day Koh Elaine

Please let me help you with dictionaries:

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/pass-on

https://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=pass%20on


I think it is best to use pass on, passed on.

It is neat and accepted worldwide
tautophile
Posted: Sunday, October 24, 2021 10:24:49 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/14/2018
Posts: 2,021
Neurons: 49,964
"Two years have passed since local star Aloysius Pang has passed on..." is a grammatical sentence, more or less, but it's not a good sentence, because the word "passed" is repeated with different meanings. The first "passed", in the phrase "Two years have passed...", means "[have] elapsed, gone by". The second, in the phrase "...has passed on...", is a euphemistic idiom for "[has] died". (Quite often, a simple "pass" is used, rather than "pass on", as a synonym for "die".) Also, the use of the present perfect in "has passed on" is awkward and not justified: a simple "passed on" would have been better.

I would recommend that the euphemism and the present perfect not be used. The sentence can be changed to "Two years have passed since local star Aloysius Pang died, ..." or "Two years have passed since the death of local star Aloysius Pang,..."

There is nothing wrong with "...but he still lingers in his girlfriend's life", but I think "...but his memory still lingers..." or "...but the memory of him still lingers..." would be better.

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