mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
get a boot in Options
Penpen
Posted: Wednesday, October 20, 2021 9:52:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/15/2016
Posts: 330
Neurons: 1,544
What does "get a boot in" mean?

31 mins: Fornals is booked for a late challenge on Townsend in the centre circle.
Everton build from the free-kick and so nearly catch West Ham out.
Johnson does get a boot in to stop Iwobi's pass, but his own clearance is too short and Everton go down the left again.
PlanetOfGiants
Posted: Wednesday, October 20, 2021 10:10:52 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 7/4/2014
Posts: 75
Neurons: 85,250
Johnson managed to deflect the path of the ball with their boot
tautophile
Posted: Wednesday, October 20, 2021 11:56:13 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/14/2018
Posts: 2,031
Neurons: 50,666
"Get the boot in" (a description of action in a soccer game) is different from "put the (or a) boot in", meaning "to kick someone in a fight or a brawl, especially if the person being kicked has already been knocked down" (the literal meaning), or "treat someone vulnerable in a cruel way" (the figurative meaning). "Put the boot in" is more common in BrE slang than AmE.

Johnson got the boot in, that is, deflected the ball with his [not their--sorry, PoG] booted foot. (Which team did Johnson play for: Everton, or for West Ham? I wouldn't know: I don't follow British soccer.)
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, October 20, 2021 12:19:02 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 3,068
Neurons: 19,522
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Ben Johnson plays for West Ham.

His clearance from West Hams half is too short and allows Everton to attack again as they gained control of the ball.
PlanetOfGiants
Posted: Wednesday, October 20, 2021 12:56:48 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 7/4/2014
Posts: 75
Neurons: 85,250
tautophile wrote:
"Get the boot in" (a description of action in a soccer game) is different from "put the (or a) boot in", meaning "to kick someone in a fight or a brawl, especially if the person being kicked has already been knocked down (the literal meaning), or treat someone vulnerable in a cruel way (the figurative meaning).". "Put the boot in" is more common in BrE slang than AmE.

Johnson got the boot in, that is, deflected the ball with his [not their--sorry, PoG] booted foot. (Which team did Johnson play for: Everton, or for West Ham? I wouldn't know: I don't follow British soccer.)


The reason I used their was because the players' gender is not specified, and so, unlike you I did not assume they were male.
tautophile
Posted: Thursday, October 21, 2021 1:58:53 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/14/2018
Posts: 2,031
Neurons: 50,666
"Their" doesn't mean "his or her"; it is the possessive form of "they". As it happens, I know enough about British soccer to know that Everton and West Ham are men's professional soccer teams; I didn't need to assume that West Ham player Ben Johnson was male.

This brings up a vexed question in grammar and linguistics. "Gender" is not the same as "sex".
--In some languages, there are two genders, e.g., living things and non-living things.
--In other languages (Romance languages, for example), there are two genders, masculine and feminine, but they are sometimes at odds. In French the gender (genre) of the word for "man", l'homme, is masculine, to be sure; and and the gender of the word for "woman", la femme, is feminine--but (in French slang) the most masculine part of a man--la verge (prick)--is feminine, and the most female part of a woman--le con (cunt)--is masculine.
--In still other languages, there are three genders, masculine, feminine, and neuter, but the gender of a noun is often arbitrary. Latin and Greek were this way, and most Germanic, Celtic, and Slavic languages still are. In German, for example, der Mann (man) and der Mensch (human being) are masculine, and die Frau (lady) is feminine, but das Weib (woman) and das Mädchen (girl) are neuter, as das Fräulein.
--English, though a Germanic language, has three genders, but they're not arbitrary. Generally speaking, words for male humans and creatures are thought of as being of the masculine gender, words for female humans and creatures are usually feminine, and all other words are neuter. There are exceptions. Ships are usually called "she", even if the ship's name is that of a man, like the Edmund Fitzgerald in the famous Gordon Lightfoot song, or an abstract word like Titanic. A baby is often referred to as "it" in circumstances where the fact that it's an infant is more important than its sex: We would say "The baby needs to have its diaper/nappy changed", whether the baby is (to use the old-fashioned description) a man-child (boy) or a maid-child (girl).
--Still other languages have no "gender" in the Indo-European language sense at all.
--And yet others have a number of genders that bear no relation to sex at all.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.