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You just happy OK Options
sb70012
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2021 11:58:19 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/6/2013
Posts: 1,302
Neurons: 6,733
You just happy OK
As long as you are happy

Hi,
I have a Chinese friend. Sometimes he takes his kids to the park to play. His kids become happy and excited and tell their dad "Daddy, thank you for bringing us to the park. Wow we are happy. I love playing on the swing. Thank you Daddy, thank you Daddy. "

Then the dad tells them "Haha, you just happy OK! "

He also sometimes uses it to his wife. For example when he takes his wife to a restaurant to treat her to a delicious dinner, his wife says "Wow, thank you. I really enjoy eating in this restaurant. " then he tells his wife "you just happy OK".

Is it good English? If not, then how can we say such a thing?

Thank you.
Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2021 12:40:02 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/4/2015
Posts: 6,369
Neurons: 1,382,661
Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
No, it isn't good English.

Depending on his intended message (could be a couple of things), he might say...
You just be happy! (Clunky, but very similar to what he is already saying.)
I'm glad you're happy.
I'm glad this makes you happy.
I like to see you happy.
I like seeing you happy.
I'm glad to see you so happy.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2021 2:02:51 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 46,883
Neurons: 663,178
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
I wonder why you want to say it in English?

I've thousands of words to tell my wife how marvellous, beautiful, gorgeous, extremely luxurious... she is.
All this in Finnish.
tautophile
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2021 2:03:50 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/14/2018
Posts: 2,021
Neurons: 49,964
"You just happy OK!" isn't perfect English, but it's easy to understand. It's short for "You're just happy [and that's] OK!" and it's the sort of phrase that would be used by someone whose first language is not English, but rather one like Chinese or Russian. For example, in Russian, the word corresponding to "am" or "is" or "are" in English is есть [est], but that's often omitted in simple sentences. Thus "ya Ivan" is Russian for "I am Ivan (i.e., John)" is "ya Ivan", not "Ya est Ivan". Chinese has several words corresponding to "be". From what I can tell, the word you would use for "are" in "you are happy" is 很 (hěn), but that's not the word you would use for "am" in "I am Li"
jcbarros
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2021 2:34:19 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/14/2010
Posts: 2,523
Neurons: 18,324
The grammar may or may not be correct. But those situations made me laugh. (I´ve been a good husband and a good father but neither my wife nor my children never told me any such things). :)
Balcácer
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2021 7:02:59 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 9/14/2021
Posts: 20
Neurons: 28,400
Location: Santiago de los Caballeros, Santiago, Dominican Re
Boo hoo!

sb70012 wrote:
You just happy OK
As long as you are happy

Hi,
I have a Chinese friend. Sometimes he takes his kids to the park to play. His kids become happy and excited and tell their dad "Daddy, thank you for bringing us to the park. Wow we are happy. I love playing on the swing. Thank you Daddy, thank you Daddy. "

Then the dad tells them "Haha, you just happy OK! "

He also sometimes uses it to his wife. For example when he takes his wife to a restaurant to treat her to a delicious dinner, his wife says "Wow, thank you. I really enjoy eating in this restaurant. " then he tells his wife "you just happy OK".

Is it good English? If not, then how can we say such a thing?

Thank you.


Dear friend

This person who claims to be of Chinese origin is using very poor English, we can say it is an English of an infant of 3 years old or less who is starting to babble words.

Maybe this person is teasing you and is hiding a good command of the language. The Chinese, whether from the mainland or the island of Taiwan, are extraordinarily well educated.

Thanks
FounDit
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2021 7:30:22 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 16,641
Neurons: 80,265
sb70012 wrote:
You just happy OK
As long as you are happy

Hi,
I have a Chinese friend. Sometimes he takes his kids to the park to play. His kids become happy and excited and tell their dad "Daddy, thank you for bringing us to the park. Wow we are happy. I love playing on the swing. Thank you Daddy, thank you Daddy. "

Then the dad tells them "Haha, you just happy OK! "

He also sometimes uses it to his wife. For example when he takes his wife to a restaurant to treat her to a delicious dinner, his wife says "Wow, thank you. I really enjoy eating in this restaurant. " then he tells his wife "you just happy OK".

Is it good English? If not, then how can we say such a thing?

Thank you.


He should say, "I'm glad you are happy".
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2021 7:37:12 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 46,883
Neurons: 663,178
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Please, Balcácer,

don't bring your Chinese schisms here.
tautophile
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2021 9:46:41 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/14/2018
Posts: 2,021
Neurons: 49,964
"You just happy OK!" isn't perfect English, but it's easy to understand. It's short for "You're just happy [and that's] OK!" and it's the sort of phrase that would be used by someone whose first language is not English, but rather one like Russian, which often omits words corresponding to "are", or like Chinese, which has several words for "are".

In Russian, the word corresponding to "are" in our English sentence above is есть ("est") but that's often omitted in simple sentences. Russian for "you are happy" is ты счастлив ("ti schastliv"), literally "you happy", not ты есть счастлив. Chinese has several words that translate as "are". "Hěn" is one; "shì" is another. The sentence "You are happy" is 你很快乐 "Nǐ hěn kuàilè", but the sentence "You are John" is 你是约翰 Nǐ shì yuēhàn. So a native Chinese-speaker might de-emphasize the "are" when rendering "Nǐ hěn kuàilè" into English. "You're happy" and "You happy" sound very similar, after all, even when spoken by native English-speakers, particularly if they say the "'re" softly.
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