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Slid out/slimy Options
Penz
Posted: Thursday, October 14, 2021 8:23:09 AM

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Quote:
As the werewolf wrenched itself free of the manacle binding it, the dog seized it about the neck and pulled it backwards, away from Ron and Pettigrew. They were locked, jaw to jaw, claws ripping at each other -

a) Wrench itself free
Does this mean he broke the manacle or slipped free?

b) Are manacles and shackes the same?

c) Does jaw to jaw mean their jaws were inside each other's mouth - it would be a kiss?

d) Does ripping at mean the claws were just aiming at each other but didn't hurt at all?

Quote:
Black gave a shudder, rolled over and lay motionless on the ground, pale as death.
He'll be all right. I'm going to go and live with him.
'Expecto patronum! Hermione, help me! Expecto patronum! '

Is the first line Harry's thought?

Quote:
A dead, slimy hand slid out from under the cloak. It made a gesture as though to sweep the Patronus aside.

a) Slid out?
b) Sweep aside? Is it gesturing Harry to sweep it aside or is it sweeping it aside itself?

Context - Harry is surrounded by Dementors.
Quote:
Face down, too weak to move, sick and shaking, Harry opened his eyes.

Does sick here mean "dissapointed or miserble" or "he is feeling nauseous and unwell because of emotions"?




tautophile
Posted: Thursday, October 14, 2021 11:24:14 AM
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Quote 1
(a) The werewolf slipped free of (or from) the manacle.
(b) Manacles and shackles are essentially the same. Manacles bind the hands or wrists; shackles do the same but that term is also used for things that go around the ankles and bind the feet.
(c) "Jaw to jaw" suggests that the dog and the wolf were biting at each other's snouts. That would not be a kiss.
(d) "Ripping at" here means "striking with the claws" in a violent manner and with the intention of hurting or injuring.

Quote 2
(a) "slid out" = moved out from under some cover slowly, quietly, and smoothly.
(b) "sweep aside"--I would assume the hand is trying to sweep the Patronus--whatever that is--aside itself.

Quote 3
It appears to me that Harry is feeling all those thing: disappointed and miserable, and also nauseous and unwell because of emotions. (Mind you, I've not read the books, so I don't know that for sure.)
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, October 14, 2021 12:44:01 PM

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tautophile wrote:


Quote 3
It appears to me that Harry is feeling all those thing: disappointed and miserable, and also nauseous and unwell because of emotions. (Mind you, I've not read the books, so I don't know that for sure.)


Dementors are magical beings in the book series that feed on a humans positive emotions, eventually consuming their soul he’s feeling all those things and more.

I’d agree the hand was trying to sweep the Patronus away, in the world of Harry Potter a Patronus charm is a magical defence against evil creatures like Dementors that a wizard can summon. The hand is that of one of these creatures.
Penz
Posted: Thursday, October 14, 2021 1:09:14 PM

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From quote 1)
1) If a person turns into a werewolf, wouldn't they break the manacles as the manacles would probably be too tight to slip free?
2) Doesn't "jaw to jaw" mean their jaws were inside each other's, that is, locked, instead of them biting at their jaws?
3) But the "ripping at" do imply they weren't actually hitting as it uses "at"?

• I guess you missed quote 2 by mistake.

Thank you so much!
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, October 14, 2021 1:20:57 PM

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When a person transforms into a werewolf the shape of their body changes from human to a new form, manacles that fit tightly on a human may be loose on them now.
Have you never seen dogs fighting with each other?
They bare their teeth and snap at each other.

Ripping at means that they were successful in hitting each other,
Penz
Posted: Thursday, October 14, 2021 1:52:55 PM

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Then what would be the difference between "rip something/someone" and "rip at something/someone"?

And would you please look at quote 2?
Thanks a ton!
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, October 14, 2021 2:28:50 PM

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Penz wrote:
Then what would be the difference between "rip something/someone" and "rip at something/someone"?

And would you please look at quote 2?
Thanks a ton!


Not a lot, the two are basically the same.

Quote number 2, there is not enough context.
Penz
Posted: Friday, October 15, 2021 1:07:24 AM

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In quote 2, It doesn't mention who said that line. But there is a line which seems like he is thinking. Because the next line where Harry speaks starts as a fresh line rather than just continuing from the first line.

And doesn't "at" sometimes imply "that we just aim but don't hit"?
Audiendus
Posted: Friday, October 15, 2021 2:11:40 AM
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Penz wrote:
And doesn't "at" sometimes imply "that we just aim but don't hit"?

"At" emphasises the aim, but it doesn't imply that the aim was unsuccessful.

"The dog tore at the bread" implies that the dog tore the bread.
Penz
Posted: Friday, October 15, 2021 2:16:57 AM

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In quote 2, It doesn't mention who said that line. But there is a line which seems like he is thinking. Because the next line where Harry speaks starts as a fresh line rather than just continuing from the first line.

Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, October 15, 2021 4:19:24 AM

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Sometime the the context is something else in the writing.
For example it might be.
“ Harry looked at where Black lay.”

That tells us that Harry is looking at and is coming to some conclusions as to the condition of Black. The sentence would then be Harry’s thoughts on the matter.

That’s the type of context we need a few sentences before the quote you want answered that tells us the flow of the action.
Penz
Posted: Friday, October 15, 2021 5:09:40 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 724
Neurons: 5,159
Sarrriesfan wrote:
Sometime the the context is something else in the writing.
For example it might be.
“ Harry looked at where Black lay.”

That tells us that Harry is looking at and is coming to some conclusions as to the condition of Black. The sentence would then be Harry’s thoughts on the matter.

That’s the type of context we need a few sentences before the quote you want answered that tells us the flow of the action.


Thank you so much!
When I tried to analyse the text considering what you have said, I figured it out myself.
It was the screaming in his head.
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