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There is a good deal of satisfaction about being thoroughly miserable; but nobody likes a fit of the blues. Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, October 4, 2021 12:00:00 AM
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Joined: 3/7/2009
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There is a good deal of satisfaction about being thoroughly miserable; but nobody likes a fit of the blues.

Jerome K. Jerome (1859-1927)
Bully_rus
Posted: Monday, October 4, 2021 6:19:57 AM
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Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Nah. Being thoroughly miserable is too much. But just a pinch of bitterness is perfectly fine for my taste and appetite… Right?
jcbarros
Posted: Monday, October 4, 2021 11:26:38 AM

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Masochism Limited Co. ;)
monamagda
Posted: Monday, October 4, 2021 12:19:00 PM

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Context from:Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow

3.
ON BEING IN THE BLUES.


I can enjoy feeling melancholy, and there is a good deal of satisfaction about being thoroughly miserable; but nobody likes a fit of the blues. Nevertheless, everybody has them; notwithstanding which, nobody can tell why. There is no accounting for them. You are just as likely to have one on the day after you have come into a large fortune as on the day after you have left your new silk umbrella in the train. Its effect upon you is somewhat similar to what would probably be produced by a combined attack of toothache, indigestion, and cold in the head. You become stupid, restless, and irritable; rude to strangers and dangerous toward your friends; clumsy, maudlin, and quarrelsome; a nuisance to yourself and everybody about you.

While it is on you can do nothing and think of nothing, though feeling at the time bound to do something. You can't sit still so put on your hat and go for a walk; but before you get to the corner of the street you wish you hadn't come out and you turn back. You open a book and try to read, but you find Shakespeare trite and commonplace, Dickens is dull and prosy, Thackeray a bore, and Carlyle too sentimental. You throw the book aside and call the author names. Then you "shoo" the cat out of the room and kick the door to after her. You think you will write your letters, but after sticking at "Dearest Auntie: I find I have five minutes to spare, and so hasten to write to you," for a quarter of an hour, without being able to think of another sentence, you tumble the paper into the desk, fling the wet pen down upon the table-cloth, and start up with the resolution of going to see the Thompsons. While pulling on your gloves, however, it occurs to you that the Thompsons are idiots; that they never have supper; and that you will be expected to jump the baby. You curse the Thompsons and decide not to go.

By this time you feel completely crushed. You bury your face in your hands and think you would like to die and go to heaven. You picture to yourself your own sick-bed, with all your friends and relations standing round you weeping. You bless them all, especially the young and pretty ones. They will value you when you are gone, so you say to yourself, and learn too late what they have lost; and you bitterly contrast their presumed regard for you then with their decided want of veneration now.

http://www.literaturepage.com/read/idlethoughts-18.html

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