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Penz
Posted: Thursday, September 16, 2021 6:10:42 AM

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He seems to be going for man rather than woman.

I think it should have been "a man rather than a woman"?
thar
Posted: Thursday, September 16, 2021 7:22:50 AM

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There are contexts where it might be right. It depends on the meaning of 'going for'.

eg aiming to achieve the look of, vs attacking.
Penz
Posted: Thursday, September 16, 2021 7:32:52 AM

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I wanted to ask if man and woman need articles there as they are both singular nouns?
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, September 16, 2021 7:37:08 AM

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Here we are not talking about one specified man (first mentioned "a man", and after that "the man"), but the looks of man in general.
Someone can have a look of man or woman, male or female.
Penz
Posted: Thursday, September 16, 2021 8:01:23 AM

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Sorry as I am unable to express my question clearly.


Suppose there were oranges and mangoes.

And a man could take one or two.
What would we say.

He goes for orange rather than mango or he goes for oranges rather than mangoes.

And he were to take only one.
And it is not a specific situation it is a characteristic of him that he follows throughout his life.
It not specifically about man or female.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, September 16, 2021 8:21:25 AM

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Brick wall
Judith Barth
Posted: Thursday, September 16, 2021 10:31:49 AM

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I believe it should be, He goes for men rather than women. This seems to infer sexual preference.
Wilmar (USA) 1M
Posted: Thursday, September 16, 2021 7:43:13 PM

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Could we fix up the sentence and then start again? I don't think we understand what you're trying to demonstrate.

Is it about preference? Is it possible to begin with this?
He prefers oranges to mangoes.
Or...
He chose an orange rather than a mango.
Or...
He would choose an orange before he chose a mango.
Or... what?

Penz
Posted: Friday, September 17, 2021 3:43:20 AM

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Is it okay to say?
He goes for mango rather than orange.

Considering we are not using articles?
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, September 17, 2021 3:57:27 AM

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No. After checking the definition of "going for" in the dictionaries I've ended up in the conclusion:

"He seems to be going for man rather than woman."
The statement is about liking or being attracted to someone. He prefers men (romantically or sexually) rather than women.

"He goes for mango rather than orange." is ok.
This is about interest or desire. He prefers mango (to eat) rather than orange.
Penz
Posted: Friday, September 17, 2021 4:37:06 AM

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My question is pertaining to the use of articles?
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, September 17, 2021 5:24:04 AM

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I answered to the use of articles in my first post. Look of man or attraction for man is the same, concerning articles.

Penz
Posted: Friday, September 17, 2021 9:38:48 AM

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I am terribly sorry as I am unable to grasp your answer.

Let me put it this way.

1) He goes for orange rather than mango.
2) He goes for an orange than than a mango.
3) He goes for oranges rather than mangoes.

Which one is correct?
And if they all are, what are the differences?
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, September 17, 2021 9:48:45 AM

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Penz wrote:


1) He goes for orange rather than mango.
2) He goes for an orange than than a mango.
3) He goes for oranges rather than mangoes.



1) and 3) are the same. He likes orange fruits more than mango, in general.
2) There are some fruit on the desk. He takes one orange, not a mango.
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