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Is "brown colour" correct? Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Friday, July 23, 2021 1:08:07 PM
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Tasmanian Wood was the material that Terry landed on for his loving project. This is an ornamental timber of exceptional quality that is mainly utilized to construct furniture and cabinets with, as well as paneling and turning, as well as a variety of trinkets. This is a hardy wood that possesses a close-grain and a glossy polish and brown color. Terry was sure that this item would last the test of time.

Is "brown colour" correct?

Thanks!




The One And Only Emily👩🏽‍⚕️
Posted: Friday, July 23, 2021 1:39:55 PM

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It can be. It is just a british version of the word 'color.' Unless You wanted to use the american word 'color,' you can use the word 'colour.'
Koh Elaine
Posted: Friday, July 23, 2021 2:03:55 PM
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The One And Only Emily wrote:
It can be. It is just a british version of the word 'color.' Unless You wanted to use the american word 'color,' you can use the word 'colour.'

Thanks!

I'm not thinking of the spelling. I have been told that one cannot say "brown colour" but "colour brown" is ok. For example, one can say "I like the colour brown", but not "I like brown colour."
Dan Lewis 2222
Posted: Friday, July 23, 2021 2:31:56 PM

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I agree with you Koh Elaine.

The original sentence could be rewritten various ways including:

This is a hardy wood that possesses a close-grain and a glossy polish and a brown color.
This is a hardy brown wood that possesses a close-grain and a glossy polish.
This is a hardy, brown-colored wood that possesses a close-grain and a glossy polish.

Since there are many variations of the color brown one might include an appropriate adjective such as:
This is a hardy wood that possesses a close-grain and a glossy polish and a rich brown color.
The One And Only Emily👩🏽‍⚕️
Posted: Friday, July 23, 2021 3:04:55 PM

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Location: College Station, Texas, United States
Koh Elaine wrote:
The One And Only Emily wrote:
It can be. It is just a british version of the word 'color.' Unless You wanted to use the american word 'color,' you can use the word 'colour.'

Thanks!

I'm not thinking of the spelling. I have been told that one cannot say "brown colour" but "colour brown" is ok. For example, one can say "I like the colour brown", but not "I like brown colour."


Oh, okay! By the way, you're welcome! ;)
Juegos Video
Posted: Friday, July 23, 2021 6:46:37 PM

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Koh Elaine wrote:
Tasmanian Wood was the material that Terry landed on for his loving project. This is an ornamental timber of exceptional quality that is mainly utilized to construct furniture and cabinets with, as well as paneling and turning, as well as a variety of trinkets. This is a hardy wood that possesses a close-grain and a glossy polish and brown color. Terry was sure that this item would last the test of time.

Is "brown colour" correct?

Thanks!






There's a slightly more efficient construction:

"This is a hardy, brownish wood possessing a close grain and glossy polish."
FounDit
Posted: Friday, July 23, 2021 6:49:31 PM

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Koh Elaine wrote:
Tasmanian Wood was the material that Terry landed on for his loving project. This is an ornamental timber of exceptional quality that is mainly utilized to construct furniture and cabinets with, as well as paneling and turning, as well as a variety of trinkets. This is a hardy wood that possesses a close-grain and a glossy polish and brown color. Terry was sure that this item would last the test of time.

Is "brown colour" correct?

Thanks!

It looks fine to me and sounds very natural. I can easily imagine saying it. The "a" preceding the list with close-grain and glossy polish would carry over to the color as well, even though not spoken.

Audiendus
Posted: Saturday, July 24, 2021 1:40:12 AM
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Koh Elaine wrote:
I have been told that one cannot say "brown colour" but "colour brown" is ok. For example, one can say "I like the colour brown", but not "I like brown colour."

"Brown colour" is perfectly OK here; "brown" is used as an adjective. It refers to a specific attribute of the wood; the wood possesses a brown colour. Things can have a brown colour, a round shape, a rough texture, a large size etc.

"The colour brown", in which "brown" is a noun, refers to brown as an abstract thing.

I like the colour brown.
I like things with a brown colour.
The painting uses plenty of brown colour.


I would not hyphenate "close grain".
Bathcoup
Posted: Monday, August 23, 2021 12:29:35 PM
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"The painting uses plenty of brown colour."
I sense the word colour here (the sentence is fine) is more material than an abstract concept; it's the substance containing that colour, or pigment, if you like.

"would last the test of time" -- stand the test of time, or simply last a long time
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