mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest
Beckham has missed several games through injury. Options
onsen
Posted: Monday, July 19, 2021 10:24:48 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/14/2017
Posts: 1,231
Neurons: 10,994
Hello,

Quote:

injury noun (plural injuries)
1 [countable, uncountable] a wound or damage to part of your body caused by an accident or attack
omitted
Beckham has missed several games through injury (= because of injury).

COLLOCATIONS
ADJECTIVES/NOUN + INJURY
omitted
permanent
The brain can be affected by permanent injury after a serious accident.

VERBS
omitted
escape/avoid injury
Two workmen narrowly escaped injury when a wall collapsed.

injury


A. Beckham has missed several games through injury.
B. The brain can be affected by permanent injury after a serious accident.
C. Two workmen narrowly escaped injury when a wall collapsed.
(from the quote)

Q1. Why is the noun 'injury' used as an uncountable noun in sentences A, B and C, respectively?

Q2. Do the following sentences work or not?

1. Beckham has missed several games through an injury.
2. Beckham has missed several games through injuries.

3. The brain can be affected by a permanent injury after a serious accident.
4. The brain can be affected by permanent injuries after a serious accident.

5. Two workmen narrowly escaped an injury when a wall collapsed.
6. Two workmen narrowly escaped injuries when a wall collapsed.


Thank you.
FounDit
Posted: Monday, July 19, 2021 10:36:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 16,392
Neurons: 78,627
onsen wrote:
Hello,

Quote:

injury noun (plural injuries)
1 [countable, uncountable] a wound or damage to part of your body caused by an accident or attack
omitted
Beckham has missed several games through injury (= because of injury).

COLLOCATIONS
ADJECTIVES/NOUN + INJURY
omitted
permanent
The brain can be affected by permanent injury after a serious accident.

VERBS
omitted
escape/avoid injury
Two workmen narrowly escaped injury when a wall collapsed.

injury


A. Beckham has missed several games through injury.
B. The brain can be affected by permanent injury after a serious accident.
C. Two workmen narrowly escaped injury when a wall collapsed.
(from the quote)

Q1. Why is the noun 'injury' used as an uncountable noun in sentences A, B and C, respectively?
Because "injury" as used here indicates a state of injury, a wound, or damage, but it also possible to have more than one injury - more than one wound, and more than one site of damage.

Q2. Do the following sentences work or not?
Yes.
1. Beckham has missed several games through an injury.
2. Beckham has missed several games through injuries.

3. The brain can be affected by a permanent injury after a serious accident.
4. The brain can be affected by permanent injuries after a serious accident.

5. Two workmen narrowly escaped an injury when a wall collapsed.
6. Two workmen narrowly escaped injuries when a wall collapsed.


Thank you.
thar
Posted: Monday, July 19, 2021 11:17:33 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 25,052
Neurons: 101,662
Uncountable - the concept, the idea.
People escaped without injury. (nobody was hurt)
He missed many games through injury. (at various times, and for various problems, he couldn't play)

A specific problem
His injury keeps him out of the game. (a broken ankle)
His injuries keep him out of the game (a broken ankle and sprained wrist)
He suffered an injury to his shoulder.
People suffered severe injuries (some headwounds, some broken legs, some internal bleeding)


1. Beckham has missed several games through an injury.
OK but unnatural. One injury that lasted a long time.
But it is not natural to say that. You would say 'through injury' to be vague and 'through a hamstring injury' to be specific.


2. Beckham has missed several games through injuries.
Two or more injuries, yes. Not necessarily consecutive games.


3. The brain can be affected by a permanent injury after a serious accident.
No, the injury is the problem. The effect is damage.

4. The brain can be affected by permanent injuries after a serious accident.
No.
You have permanent injuries, or you are permanently affected.


5. Two workmen narrowly escaped an injury when a wall collapsed.
No-you can't say 'an injury' because that is a single, specific problem. A cut on their leg, or a broken foot. If they had been hit, you can't know they would get a specific injury, and you can't know they would only receive one injury. They would probably have received several injuries. Several cuts, maybe several broken bones.


6. Two workmen narrowly escaped injuries when a wall collapsed.
No. You don't know which injuries. All you know is they were not hurt. It is the concept, not the concrete.

5 and 6
They escaped injury.
tautophile
Posted: Monday, July 19, 2021 3:49:43 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/14/2018
Posts: 1,807
Neurons: 43,281
A. Beckham has missed several games through injury. This is OK, but would be better as "Beckham has missed several games because of [recent] injuries" or "...a recent injury" or "...an injury".

B. The brain can be affected by permanent injury after a serious accident. Acceptable as a sentence, but not very good. I think the meaning would be better expressed by "Head injuries from accidents can affect the brain" (which is a general statement) or "Head injuries from the accident can affect the brain" (which refers to a particular accident).

C. Two workmen narrowly escaped injury when a wall collapsed. This sentence is fine.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.