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A captain , beaten Options
Penz
Posted: Friday, June 11, 2021 1:54:34 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 406
Neurons: 2,794
He is a captain and a seeker. (two person B.E)
He is a captain and Seeker. (one person)
Buy what about American English? Is it the same case there?



They are one person who has two roles as captain and as seeker, but it’s still one person doing both so in British English you only use “a” in front of the first one.
Do we use noun noun without article in this case?



Quote:
Twice Harry nearly hit another player, without knowing whether it was a team-mate or opponent;

I have seen many times they use "an article" after "and" when addressing two nouns? Why not "or an opponent"?




Harry's broom has broken now.

Quote:
Slowly, she reached down for a bag at her feet, turned it upside-town and tipped a dozen bits of splintered wood and twig onto the bed, the only remains of Harry's faithful, finally beaten broomstick.

Does "beaten" means "physically beaten" as it had fallen into the Whomping Willow or "figuratively lost"?
FounDit
Posted: Friday, June 11, 2021 10:50:17 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 15,996
Neurons: 76,374
Penz wrote:
He is a captain and a seeker. (two person B.E)
He is a captain and Seeker. (one person)
Buy what about American English? Is it the same case there?
Since "he" is only one person, I'd read these as being the same person in both cases.

In your other post where you had, "They have a new captain and seeker", I read it as being two people. I said that in AmE, I would expect one person doing both jobs to be described as someone who was "both a captain and seeker". There was some disagreement from other readers on this who saw it as one person.

That is quite possible, but if so, I would've expected that to have been made clear in the following text.



They are one person who has two roles as captain and as seeker, but it’s still one person doing both so in British English you only use “a” in front of the first one.
Do we use noun noun without article in this case?


Quote:
Twice Harry nearly hit another player, without knowing whether it was a team-mate or opponent;

I have seen many times they use "an article" after "and" when addressing two nouns? Why not "or an opponent"?
Very often we omit articles when we use two nouns together as in: is he friend or foe, family or stranger?, etc.



Harry's broom has broken now.

Quote:
Slowly, she reached down for a bag at her feet, turned it upside-town and tipped a dozen bits of splintered wood and twig onto the bed, the only remains of Harry's faithful, finally beaten broomstick.

Does "beaten" means "physically beaten" as it had fallen into the Whomping Willow or "figuratively lost"?
If it has been splintered into bits, it is physically beaten, not figuratively lost.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, June 11, 2021 12:53:19 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 2,636
Neurons: 16,744
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
It’s one person the text makes it clear as FD suggests.
Quote:
'I know that, but we can't prove it,' said Wood bitterly.
'And we've been practising all those moves assuming we're playing Slytherin, and instead it's Hufflepuff, and their style's quite different.
They've got a new captain and Seeker, Cedric Diggory –'

The correct punctuation a comma not a full stop as in your original post makes it clear the clause refers to one person.
He plays the role of seeker the same as Harry trying to catch the Golden Snitch.
Quote:
He’s an excellent seeker


Quote:
Harry looked wildly around. Cedric Diggory was pelting up the field, and a tiny speck of gold was shimmering in the rain filled air between them..."
— Cedric Diggory playing Quidditch in his fifth year
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