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Please kindly queue up. Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Monday, June 7, 2021 4:26:52 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
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Please kindly queue up.

Can "please" be used with "kindly"?

Thanks!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, June 7, 2021 4:51:31 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 44,086
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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
With a comma it sounds more natural.

Please, kindly queue up.
sureshot
Posted: Monday, June 7, 2021 10:05:32 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2015
Posts: 2,957
Neurons: 477,683
Koh Elaine wrote:
Please kindly queue up.

Can "please" be used with "kindly"?

Thanks!

_______________

First, you would need to justify why you need to use these similar words together!
Usually, you would not need to use both of these in the same sentence."Please" and "kindly" are both used to be more polite to other people. Using the two words together would only make sense if you really wanted to emphasize how important it was to be polite.

The use of both these words together is redundant. It is sometimes done by non-native speakers of English. In case, you have decided to use both the words together for the sake of being extra polite, a comma should be placed after the first word "please".
Audiendus
Posted: Monday, June 7, 2021 10:36:53 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/24/2011
Posts: 7,396
Neurons: 1,372,811
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
An acceptable alternative would be "Kindly queue up, please".
georgew
Posted: Tuesday, June 8, 2021 12:17:20 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/13/2016
Posts: 426
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Location: Calabasas, California, United States
Koh Elaine wrote:
Please kindly queue up.

Can "please" be used with "kindly"?

Thanks!


No. It's obsequious and frankly annoying.

Also, "queue up" is grammatically poor. It should be simply "queue."

sureshot
Posted: Tuesday, June 8, 2021 6:33:04 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2015
Posts: 2,957
Neurons: 477,683
georgew wrote:


Also, "queue up" is grammatically poor. It should be simply "queue."


___________________
"Queue up" is common in British English.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English says:

queue2 ●○○ verb (also queue up) [intransitive] British English
1 to form or join a line of people or vehicles waiting to do something or go somewhere SYN line up American English

queue for
- Some of the people queuing for tickets had been there since dawn.

queue (up) to do something
- We had to queue up for ages to get served.

2 if people are queuing up to do something, they all want to do it very much

queue up to do something
- The school is one of the best, and parents are queuing up to send their children there.

queue up for something
- Actresses are queuing up for the part.
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