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amplify/magnify Options
Tara2
Posted: Sunday, June 6, 2021 5:07:44 PM

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What's the difference between 'amplify' and 'magnify'?
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Sunday, June 6, 2021 5:26:59 PM

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thar
Posted: Sunday, June 6, 2021 5:46:59 PM

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They both mean to make bigger. The only difference is collocation, the way they are used.

You magnify an image to make it bigger; you amplify a sound to make it louder.



You amplify a wave. The height of a wave is its amplitude.

So in certain circumstances there is no difference, in certain circumstances only one fits. But the actual meaning is pretty much the same.

Tara2
Posted: Monday, June 7, 2021 6:02:00 AM

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Many thanks dear thar for the great explanation!!!
Write Edge
Posted: Monday, June 7, 2021 8:35:24 AM

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Magnify is used to praise, glorify (someone or something, especially god) while amplify is used to render larger, more extended, or more intense.
thar
Posted: Monday, June 7, 2021 9:09:21 AM

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The origin of magnify is magnus, which is Latin for big or great.

So that root does lead to the English word 'magnificent'

but magnify in normal English does not mean praise. Just make bigger. 🔍

The Latin term meaning glorify does persist in Church Latin, such as the Magnificat:
Quote:
The Magnificat is one of the eight most ancient Christian hymns and perhaps the earliest Marian hymn.[2][3] Within the whole of Christianity, the canticle is most frequently recited within the Liturgy of the Hours. In Western Christianity, the Magnificat is most often sung or recited during the main evening prayer service: Vespers[1] in the Catholic and Lutheran churches, and Evening Prayer (or Evensong) in Anglicanism. In Eastern Christianity, the Magnificat is always sung at Matins. The Magnificat may also be sung during worship services, especially in the Advent season during which these verses are traditionally read.



Magna is also found in place names. If you have a place with one name but is really two villages or a village and a hamlet, there are several ways of describing that. Often you use 'upper and lower' (when there is a river). Some are 'Great' and 'Little'. But some places are distinguished by being Magna (great) and Parva (small).
Quote:
There are several locations where one settlement is named "Magna" and another nearby "Parva". In this context, magna and parva are the Latin terms for "great" and "little" respectively.
Examples include Appleby Magna and Appleby Parva in Leicestershire, Ash Magna and Ash Parva in Shropshire, and Dalton Magna and Dalton Parva in South Yorkshire.







Tara2
Posted: Monday, June 7, 2021 4:26:54 PM

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Interesting. Thank you so, s\o much thar!!!
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