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[weekday/weekend daytime] or [on weekdays/weekends during the daytime] Options
robjen
Posted: Sunday, June 6, 2021 2:54:41 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/17/2015
Posts: 818
Neurons: 4,538
(1a) On weekends, Mary takes care of her children.

(2a) On weekdays, Jack has a part-time job.

The sentences above don't tell you whether the events happen in the daytime or nighttime. I am wondering if I can add "daytime" to the sentences, as shown below.

(1b) During the weekend daytime, Mary takes care of her children.
(1c) On weekends, Mary takes care of her children during the daytime.

(2b) During the weekday daytime, Jack has a part-time job.
(2c) On weekdays, Jack has a part-time job during the daytime.

All of my non-native English speaking friends think the last four sentences are all OK. What is your opinion? Thank you very much.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, June 6, 2021 3:04:23 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 35,277
Neurons: 241,541
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi.
I think they are all 'correct' by grammar rules.
However, (1b) and (2b) don't sound quite right - a bit awkward.

I wouldn't use "during the daytime" - just "during the days" or "in the daytime".

(1d) On weekends, Mary takes care of her children during the days.
(1e) On weekends, Mary takes care of her children in the daytime.
(1e) During weekend days, Mary takes care of her children.
(2d) On weekdays, Jack has a part-time job during the days.
(2e) On weekdays, Jack has a part-time job in the daytime.
(2f) On weekdays, Jack has a part-time day-job.



tautophile
Posted: Sunday, June 6, 2021 5:04:33 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/14/2018
Posts: 1,589
Neurons: 35,629
(1a) I assume that Mary is the mother of these children, not a caretaker or nanny. Sentence (1a) is grammatical and pretty much idiomatic, but one would normally expect that Mary takes care of her children the entire weekend, not just during the daytime. (Being a mother is a full-time job, most women agree.) Thus sentence (1b) is also grammatical but not idiomatic; it doesn't sound right. Sentence (1c) is grammatical, and sounds better, but it really needs some additional information. I assume Mary is married, so I suggest "On weekends, Mary takes care of her children during the day, and her husband takes care of them during the evening, so that Mary can relax." "During the day"---which is better than "during the daytime"--means, in this context, from the time the children get up in the morning, until after they've had their supper in the evening--that is to say, during daylight hours. "In the evening" means more or less from after supper to the children's or parents' bedtime.

(2a) This sentence too is grammatical and reasonably idiomatic...but it could be improved by rewriting it as "Jack has a part-time job during the week". It would be understood that he works part-time (i.e., less than 8 hours a day or whatever a full working day is) Monday through Friday, and that he works during the day--say, from 9 AM to 3 PM, since it's a part-time job--not in the evening or at night or overnight. If he does in fact work in the evening or overnight, that should be stated, as, for example, "Jack has [or works] a part-time job from 4 AM to 9 AM Monday through Friday."
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