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Revive , toast, whipped Options
Penz
Posted: Friday, June 4, 2021 3:40:30 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 406
Neurons: 2,794
All these excerpts are taken from "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban".


Harry has woken early in the morning.
Quote:
He revived a bit over a large bowl of porridge, and by the time he'd started on toast, the rest of the team had turned up.

What does revived mean here?

Why "started on toast" as naturally I there could be many toasts on his plate?


It is a stormy day and Griffindors are playing a match against Hupplepuff. Everyone is walking down the lawns to the stadium.
Quote:
.....head bowed down against the ferocious wind, umbrellas being whipped out of their hands as they went.


Why "wind" instead of "winds" as there certainly were many winds drifting in mid-air?

Does "whipped our of hands" mean "blown away out of their hands" or "bloom as they opened"?



Quote:
Diggory smiled at Wood but Wood now looked as though he had lockjaw and merely nodded.

"to have lockjaw"?


Quote:
He flew backwards and forwards across the pitch...


"Backwards"?
Does it mean his broom could fly backwards?

"across" mean "from one side to another", isn't it?
Though I don't think that definition fully fits here?



Quote:
Twice Harry nearly hit another player, without knowing whether it was a team-mate or opponent;

I have seen many times they use "an article" after "and" when addressing two nouns?



Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, June 4, 2021 5:19:24 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 2,636
Neurons: 16,744
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Penz wrote:
All these excerpts are taken from "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban".


Harry has woken early in the morning.
Quote:
He revived a bit over a large bowl of porridge, and by the time he'd started on toast, the rest of the team had turned up.

What does revived mean here?

Why "started on toast" as naturally I there could be many toasts on his plate?

Toast here is uncountable.

https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/toast
Quote:
1. UNCOUNTABLE NOUN
Toast is bread which has been cut into slices and made brown and crisp by cooking at a high temperature.






It is a stormy day and Griffindors are playing a match against Hupplepuff. Everyone is walking down the lawns to the stadium.
Quote:
.....head bowed down against the ferocious wind, umbrellas being whipped out of their hands as they went.


Why "wind" instead of "winds" as there certainly were many winds drifting in mid-air?

Does "whipped our of hands" mean "blown away out of their hands" or "bloom as they opened"?


There is just one wind not many, in Britain we if there is a strong current of air blowing in a prevailing direction we think of that as an uncountable noun. For there to be winds there would have to be many unpredictable currents of air.
It’s blown out of their hands.

Quote:
Diggory smiled at Wood but Wood now looked as though he had lockjaw and merely nodded.

"to have lockjaw"?
Lockjaw is a medical condition commonly a symptom of the disease Tetanus, muscles in the face spasm causing the jaws in freeze or lock into place involuntarily.

Quote:
He flew backwards and forwards across the pitch...


"Backwards"?
Does it mean his broom could fly backwards?

"across" mean "from one side to another", isn't it?
Though I don't think that definition fully fits here?


It’s an idiom, backwards and forwards means go to first in one direction and then another repeatedly. Although there is no reason a magical broomstick couldn’t fly backwards some planes like a Harrier Jump Jet can.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bKQlxCbaRQ4

Quote:
Twice Harry nearly hit another player, without knowing whether it was a team-mate or opponent;

I have seen many times they use "an article" after "and" when addressing two nouns?




Yes that’s correct it’s quite common.
thar
Posted: Friday, June 4, 2021 5:26:52 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 24,417
Neurons: 98,919
Edit. Answered at same time. Just slowly. Whistle


Wind is both countable and uncountable.

But with an adjective in front of it the uncountable noun wind can take an article.

The wind is the whole air movement, the weather, so there is only one wind here.
Maybe many gusts of wind, but not winds.


Toast is always uncountable. The plural is pieces of toast.
In the same way bread is uncountable and you have slices of bread or loaves of bread.
(bread can be countable because you can make bread in different ways. But toast is just toasted bread.)

Some languages use 'tost' as a countable noun to mean a filled toasted sandwich. But it does not mean that in English. This is slices of toast.

Revived. Here intransitive.
Came alive again. Metaphorically.

You can look up lockjaw. It is a name for tetanus. It acquired that name because it makes your jaw muscles rigid (locked) so you can't open your mouth. So it it like his jaw was clamped shut.
Penz
Posted: Wednesday, June 9, 2021 12:38:14 AM

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Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 406
Neurons: 2,794
Revive meaning?
georgew
Posted: Wednesday, June 9, 2021 1:08:59 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/13/2016
Posts: 426
Neurons: 2,572
Location: Calabasas, California, United States
Penz wrote:
Revive meaning?


Here. Let me look that up for you.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/revive

Penz
Posted: Wednesday, June 9, 2021 5:06:31 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 406
Neurons: 2,794
Was that sarcasm?
He wasn't passed out or even dead. Then why "revive" ?

And "across" mean "from one side to another" but here it doesn't mean that here, I think?


And last question about articles?
Please help.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, June 9, 2021 5:47:56 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 24,417
Neurons: 98,919
It is metaphorical.

He needs breakfast to wake him up, energise him.




yes, across the pitch from one side to the other.

Backwards and forwards just means the movement was reversed and repeated several times.





Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, June 9, 2021 5:50:45 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 2,636
Neurons: 16,744
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Revive has more than one meaning.
https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/revive
Quote:
2. to give or assume new vitality; flourish again or cause to flourish again

Penz
Posted: Thursday, June 10, 2021 12:12:56 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 2/26/2021
Posts: 406
Neurons: 2,794
Thank you. And then the last question from the first post.
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