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Cases of CCP Virus drop drastically in India after mass distribution of ivermectin Options
FounDit
Posted: Tuesday, June 1, 2021 12:30:35 PM

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Some good news for India.

India has been in the news recently for being one of the countries where most deaths were recorded due to the CCP (Chinese Communist Party) Virus. However, mass distribution of ivermectin has recently begun in the capital city of Delhi, and the results are encouraging, according to Life Site News.

Cases in Delhi, where ivermectin distribution began on April 20, dropped from 28,395 to just 2,260 on May 22. This represents a staggering 92% drop. Similarly, cases in Uttar Pradesh have fallen from 37,944 on April 24 to 5,964 on May 22, a decrease of 84%, reports The Desert Review portal.

Read more here:

https://thebl.tv/world-news/asia/cases-of-ccp-virus-drop-drastically-in-india-after-mass-distribution-of-ivermectin.html

Víctor Lplz
Posted: Tuesday, June 1, 2021 2:11:16 PM

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Hello,
Be careful about taking ivermectin.
FDA has not approved this drug for use in treating or preventing COVID-19 in humans.
Ivermectin tablets are approved at very specific doses for some parasitic worms, and there are topical (on the skin) formulations for head lice and skin conditions like rosacea. Ivermectin is not an anti-viral (a drug for treating viruses)

Best regards
thar
Posted: Tuesday, June 1, 2021 3:11:20 PM

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Come on, FD. Giving a platform to that racist stuff is beneath you.

Certainly their policy of image being everything did not help. Possibly (open to investigation) it was a huge blunder. But using a label like that is just being puerile.


Also, Indian case numbers are complete bollocks. Anything that uses official figures is completely without foundation unless they can cite a good source.
#And anything that uses 'truth' in its 'news' page is not a reliable source.
But ignore the science, just feel the political paranoia and hate propaganda.
Please, consider the objectivity and research ethic of that source.
Please get your science from a better source before you post it in the science section.

towan52
Posted: Tuesday, June 1, 2021 4:45:46 PM

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Foundit doesn't seem to use the basics of critical thinking and chooses news sources that offer him affirmation rather than information. That's why we get these occasional howlers from him.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, June 1, 2021 9:43:42 PM

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FounDit wrote:
Some good news for India.

... where most deaths were recorded due to the CCP (Chinese Communist Party) Virus... according to Life Site News.



Doesn't sound very scientific.
towan52
Posted: Tuesday, June 1, 2021 9:43:52 PM

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Go to bed JJ!!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, June 1, 2021 9:45:21 PM

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Just woke up ;-)
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, June 3, 2021 11:17:04 AM

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Víctor Lplz wrote:
Hello,
Be careful about taking ivermectin.
FDA has not approved this drug for use in treating or preventing COVID-19 in humans.
Ivermectin tablets are approved at very specific doses for some parasitic worms, and there are topical (on the skin) formulations for head lice and skin conditions like rosacea. Ivermectin is not an anti-viral (a drug for treating viruses)

Best regards


It isn't labeled as an anti-viral, so it's use is termed "off-label" use, and it was originally for parasitic worms. However, many reports have indicated that it does effectively treat Covid.

My post wasn't intended as medical advice, but I was pleased to read that the people in India might be getting relief from the infection, and that's why I posted it. Of course, doctors should be the ones administering the drug if they think it will be advisable.
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, June 3, 2021 11:46:53 AM

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thar wrote:
Come on, FD. Giving a platform to that racist stuff is beneath you.
To what racist material to you refer? I see nothing but positives in the article, that's why I posted it.

Certainly their policy of image being everything did not help. Possibly (open to investigation) it was a huge blunder. But using a label like that is just being puerile.
I do wish you would have been more specific. What label are you referring to - the one of the Covid cases dropping?

Oh, wait. I see. You must be referring to the fact that the article said the virus is from Communist China. Multiple sources are saying that in our news outlets over the last couple of days, so it's not my "racist" opinion. Those are simply facts being reported. It is now being reported that our Dr. Fauchi, head of the NAIAD, and who help fund research into "gain-of-function" on Covid viruses in Wuhan, is documented in emails between himself and another researcher to have done exactly that. It is also now fully documented and on video that he lied when questioned on the matter before our Congress.


Also, Indian case numbers are complete bollocks. Anything that uses official figures is completely without foundation unless they can cite a good source.
So you have sources that say Ivermectin is NOT being used, or is helpful to the people in India? Why didn't you just post those, rather than dismiss the article completely?

#And anything that uses 'truth' in its 'news' page is not a reliable source.
Is that a fact? On what basis do you establish that, please?

But ignore the science, just feel the political paranoia and hate propaganda.
Please, consider the objectivity and research ethic of that source.
Please get your science from a better source before you post it in the science section.
What hate? I made a post several days ago about a video I had seen that seem to indicate that the reporting on India was not true.

One of our members from India, Revindra, told me those kinds of video were not realistic and were untrue, saying great numbers of people were suffering from the virus.

So when I saw this headline, I was glad to see the people of India were getting help. I hoped it was true.

So I'm to apologize for my "hate" in quoting the virus as having its source where it is now shown to have been sourced, for feeling happy for the people in India, and the idea that they may have something that helps them? I don't think so.

Lotje1000
Posted: Thursday, June 3, 2021 12:07:35 PM

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The proper terms are coronavirus, covid or COVID-19.

Specifically giving it a name referencing China or the CCP is racist and only serves to place the blame somewhere and rile up people's outrage. Even if it is proven that it originated in a lab in Wuhan, that doesn't change its scientific name.

Also, I read the Fauci e-mails people keep going on about and there's nothing revelatory in there. People who find them shocking seem to have not been listening since the start of the pandemic.
FounDit
Posted: Friday, June 4, 2021 11:22:44 AM

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Lotje1000 wrote:
The proper terms are coronavirus, covid or COVID-19.
I can call it anything I want to...Covid, Covid-19, the flu, the Wuhan virus, the Chinese virus. Neither you, nor anyone else, has the authority to tell me how to speak.

Specifically giving it a name referencing China or the CCP is racist and only serves to place the blame somewhere and rile up people's outrage. Even if it is proven that it originated in a lab in Wuhan, that doesn't change its scientific name.
There is nothing racist about saying where it came from, or calling it by that name. It's odd that saying the Chinese people eat bats and pangolin's isn't racist, but saying a virus comes from the country is racist. You people are hilarious.

Also, I read the Fauci e-mails people keep going on about and there's nothing revelatory in there. People who find them shocking seem to have not been listening since the start of the pandemic.
Oh, but we have been listening, and that's how we know he has been lying to all of us.

But there are thousands of those emails, and you have read them all? How did you obtain them and accomplish that is so short a time when others are still examining them? And having done so, you find no revelatory evidence in them? I don't believe you.

Hope123
Posted: Friday, June 4, 2021 6:45:20 PM

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Accusations against Fauci come from a Fox News conspiracy theory that originated with far-right extremist WorldNet Daily.

Fox News Conspiracy Against Fauci

Imagine being a world-renowned top expert with many awards for decades and when you step up for a pandemic crisis you are degraded at every turn by a powerful con man who abhorrently makes the pandemic political for his own power. Yet you carry on your duty because life depends on it, trying to stay out of the politics. That's Dr. Fauci.

Dr. Fauci

Gain-of-function is a term that could describe any type of virology research that results in the gain of a certain function. Rand Paul is accusing Fauci of the type that causes a pathogen to be more infectious to humans.

Rand Paul is saying, with no proof, while making quantum leaps in the wrong direction, that NIH funded this type of research. Fauci is saying that the Wuhan lab received a grant but not for this type of research.

When the gain-of-function research was stopped in the US in 2014, it is reasonable that funds were sent to China so the US would be kept in the loop there. On Dec. 19, 2017, the U.S. government’s pause, or moratorium, was lifted.

Rand Paul needs to publish the exact emails he is using to allege that Fauci lied. I want to read ALL of those connected myself. Not just any phrases taken out of context.

Regarding whether or not Wuhan Lab had an accident, Fauci has said, “I think that we should continue to investigate what went on in China until we find out to the best of our ability exactly what happened.”

:::::

Several fact check sources have debunked Paul who is using the issue as a fund raiser.

Here's one fact check source.

https://www.factcheck.org/2021/05/the-wuhan-lab-and-the-gain-of-function-disagreement/

"Paul cited the Cambridge Working Group in his May 11 and 13 remarks. But the group has not made “any statement … about work in Wuhan,” Marc Lipsitch, an epidemiologist at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and one of the founder members of the group, said on Twitter.

...The NIAID told the Wall Street Journal: “The research by EcoHealth Alliance, Inc. that NIH funded was for a project that aimed to characterize at the molecular level the function of newly discovered bat spike proteins and naturally occurring pathogens. Molecular characterization examines functions of an organism at the molecular level, in this case a virus and a spike protein, without affecting the environment or development or physiological state of the organism. At no time did NIAID fund gain-of-function research to be conducted at WIV.”

...And in a May 19 statement, NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins said that “neither NIH nor NIAID have ever approved any grant that would have supported ‘gain-of-function’ research on coronaviruses that would have increased their transmissibility or lethality for humans.

...Fauci told Paul at the hearing: “Dr. Baric does not do gain-of-function research, and if it is, it’s according to the guidelines and it is being conducted in North Carolina, not in China.”

...In a statement to us, Baric said: “Our work was approved by the NIH, was peer reviewed, and P3CO reviewed,” meaning reviewed under the HHS 2017 framework. “We followed all safety protocols, and our work was considered low risk because of the strain of coronaviruses being studied. It is because of our early work that the United States was in a position to quickly find the first successful treatment for SARS-CoV-2 and an effective COVID-19 vaccine.”

Hope123
Posted: Friday, June 4, 2021 6:49:47 PM

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It would be great if Ivermectin were indeed cutting down on deaths in India. That variant (whatever the numbers in its name) is spreading quickly elsewhere. Ontario is in for phase four if that happens before we can get people vaccinated to at least stop the variant from killing or mutating further.

However, trials have not not yet shown this drug (and several other promoted drugs) to be effective in severe cases, it may have a placebo effect on milder cases, and the fact that India's cases dropped after it was used in two areas is another case of correlation not confirming causation as the scientific community demands.

Further trials are needed with severe cases.

Remdesivir with dexamethasone is approved, as are other anti inflammatory drugs.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/coronavirus/expert-answers/coronavirus-drugs/faq-20485627
Lotje1000
Posted: Saturday, June 5, 2021 3:11:17 AM

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FounDit wrote:
Lotje1000 wrote:
The proper terms are coronavirus, covid or COVID-19.
I can call it anything I want to...Covid, Covid-19, the flu, the Wuhan virus, the Chinese virus. Neither you, nor anyone else, has the authority to tell me how to speak.

Specifically giving it a name referencing China or the CCP is racist and only serves to place the blame somewhere and rile up people's outrage. Even if it is proven that it originated in a lab in Wuhan, that doesn't change its scientific name.
There is nothing racist about saying where it came from, or calling it by that name. It's odd that saying the Chinese people eat bats and pangolin's isn't racist, but saying a virus comes from the country is racist. You people are hilarious.


It's interesting how you take "the proper scientific terms for it are..." as "I am ordering you to speak a certain way". Either way, yes, you don't have to use the scientific terms. Whichever terms you use shine a light on your perspective.

In this case, you're using racist terminology intended to place the blame elsewhere. It could be a propaganda-inspired outlier and you could genuinely believe it's ok to continue a narrative that makes China/CCP responsible for the virus, fully knowing the racist effects that narrative has on Asian Americans and Asians across the globe, but your history of racism on this forum implies otherwise.

FounDit wrote:
Lotje1000 wrote:
Also, I read the Fauci e-mails people keep going on about and there's nothing revelatory in there. People who find them shocking seem to have not been listening since the start of the pandemic.
Oh, but we have been listening, and that's how we know he has been lying to all of us.

But there are thousands of those emails, and you have read them all? How did you obtain them and accomplish that is so short a time when others are still examining them? And having done so, you find no revelatory evidence in them? I don't believe you.


It is also interesting how if I make a claim, you don't believe me because there's no way I could have read them all while others are still examining them, yet just earlier you said:

"It is now being reported that our Dr. Fauchi, head of the NAIAD, and who help fund research into "gain-of-function" on Covid viruses in Wuhan, is documented in emails between himself and another researcher to have done exactly that. It is also now fully documented and on video that he lied when questioned on the matter before our Congress."

Seems like you only apply skepticism where it's convenient to support your own points on dr Fauci.
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, June 5, 2021 12:22:39 PM

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Let's let the emails speak for themselves.

Creating the Virus

On Masks
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Saturday, June 5, 2021 1:55:33 PM

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FD,
do you really believe these are real?
Hope123
Posted: Saturday, June 5, 2021 5:15:38 PM

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The mask email is pretty much what Fauci said in public at that early date before the evolution of understanding of the virus evolved.
The email re creation of the Covid virus is pure fantasy. From 2005 - 14 years before Covid even was a glimmer.

...this email is far from a credible source on COVID-19's origins.

The text of the email is copied word for word from a 2005 study by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania. The message to Fauci came from Adam Gaertner, a self-described independent researcher whose website includes a disclaimer that it shouldn’t be used for medical advice. He is also pushing a supposed COVID treatment the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns "can cause serious harm."


https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/factcheck/2021/06/03/fact-check-email-fauci-doesnt-contain-origin-coronavirus/7511931002/

Spreading this fabricated attack for political purposes on this dedicated renowned man is pretty low even for you FD.

towan52
Posted: Saturday, June 5, 2021 8:13:16 PM

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The thread reminds me of "Spanish 'Flu" which had no connection to Spain whatsoever. Apparently scientists were unable to discover where it originated and the Spanish called it "French 'flu" (Gripe francesa). This pandemic killed CA 50 million people, almost three times as many as lost their lives in WWI. More here
thar
Posted: Sunday, June 6, 2021 6:21:57 AM

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Isn't the current opinion it originated in the US, and spread to Europe through troops?

Isn't it Spanish because they were the only ones admitting it existed and reporting on it. Everyone else was at war and censoring the news.
Now where does that ring a bell? Whistle


Lotje1000
Posted: Sunday, June 6, 2021 8:21:02 AM

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FounDit wrote:
Let's let the emails speak for themselves.

Creating the Virus

On Masks


The mask one is consistent with what is known: Masks are to protect other people from you and always have been, because they stop the larger droplets you expel - which are the ones that have the highest chance of transmitting the virus to other people. It's the scientific version of the someone-peeing-on-your-leg analogy of this cartoon.

This is only shocking to people who don't understand the purpose of masks or haven't been listening since the start of the pandemic.

For the creation of the virus, I direct you to Hope's post.
Hope123
Posted: Sunday, June 6, 2021 10:33:35 AM

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To add to Lotje's post re masks - there are varying grades of masks. A cloth mask with 1-2 layers does not do much. But if your mask has 3-5 layers of protective materials or is the KN95 mask available in good supply now, it will not only stop droplets from going to others, but will lessen the viral load. That means if you did catch the virus, with fewer cells your immune system has to deal with, you would probably have a less serious infection.

We've had our first shot but still double mask with a KN95 and a medical mask on top. We throw the medical one away after exposure, but thus can wear the KN95 2-3 times.

We will still wear them after our second shot. Older people may have a less immune response, plus we all may need booster shots yet for Variants.

Hope123
Posted: Sunday, June 6, 2021 10:44:13 AM

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For years, Dr. Fauci has been working tirelessly on the development of the mRNA vaccine in anticipation of a potential major viral outbreak.

On Jan 11, 2020, his team downloaded the gene sequence and on the 13th began work on the vaccine. Voilà.

Instead of trying to find something on Dr Fauci, why not just work with him? He has had to have security for himself and his family because of nut jobs and their death threats. Unbelievable that a doctor gets death threats for trying to help people.

The anti-lockdown people are the same ones who are hoax believers, anti-vaxxers, and anti maskers. And they don't even see the irony.
Oscar D. Grouch
Posted: Monday, June 7, 2021 10:55:50 PM

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Hope123 wrote:
For years, Dr. Fauci has been working tirelessly on the development of the mRNA vaccine in anticipation of a potential major viral outbreak.


Moderna has been working on their mRNA technology for 20 years. They had initially hoped that it could be used for delivering protein based drugs. After it was discovered that the body's response to mRNA diminishes with each administration, they switched to the development of a vaccine as you only need a couple of doses to establish a strong memory B cell effect.

https://www.technologyreview.com/2021/02/05/1017366/messenger-rna-vaccines-covid-hiv/
Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, June 8, 2021 7:32:52 AM

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Oscar D. Grouch wrote:
Hope123 wrote:
For years, Dr. Fauci has been working tirelessly on the development of the mRNA vaccine in anticipation of a potential major viral outbreak.


Moderna has been working on their mRNA technology for 20 years. They had initially hoped that it could be used for delivering protein based drugs. After it was discovered that the body's response to mRNA diminishes with each administration, they switched to the development of a vaccine as you only need a couple of doses to establish a strong memory B cell effect.

https://www.technologyreview.com/2021/02/05/1017366/messenger-rna-vaccines-covid-hiv/


https://apnews.com/article/years-research-groundwork-covid-19-shots-f204192f07cfcc3503dc9c7687ae6269

Thanks, Oscar. Very interesting article. The future looks brighter with smart people figuring out ways to make human life easier.

thar
Posted: Tuesday, June 8, 2021 8:14:14 AM

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Lost in all this covid vaccine (welcome though these are) has been a good candidate for a malaria vaccine. People have been working on that for years, but of course the urgency is not there if it is not in the west's back yard (at least not any more).


Quote:
Key facts
Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by parasites that are transmitted to people through the bites of infected female Anopheles mosquitoes. It is preventable and curable.
In 2019, there were an estimated 229 million cases of malaria worldwide.
The estimated number of malaria deaths stood at 409 000 in 2019.
Children aged under 5 years are the most vulnerable group affected by malaria; in 2019, they accounted for 67% (274 000) of all malaria deaths worldwide.
The WHO African Region carries a disproportionately high share of the global malaria burden. In 2019, the region was home to 94% of malaria cases and deaths.
Total funding for malaria control and elimination reached an estimated US$ 3 billion in 2019. Contributions from governments of endemic countries amounted to US$ 900 million, representing 31% of total funding.


But there is recent optimism that a vaccine might be possible;

Quote:
NEWS
26 April 2021
Malaria vaccine shows promise — now come tougher trials
Preliminary results suggest the vaccine is up to 77% effective in young children, but researchers await larger studies.
Heidi Ledford

A nurse of Ewin Polyclinic takes Malaria vaccine Mosquirix, Ghana.
A previous version of an experimental malaria vaccine was trialled at Ewin Polyclinic in Cape Coast, Ghana.Credit: Cristina Aldehuela/AFP/Getty

A vaccine against malaria has shown promise in early clinical trials, raising hopes that it might one day prove to be an effective weapon against one of the world’s biggest killers of children.

In a trial in 450 children aged 5–17 months, the vaccine, called R21, was up to 77% effective at preventing malaria over the course of one year — which, if confirmed, would clear a 75% effectiveness target set by the World Health Organization. The results are presented in a preprint posted on the server SSRN on 20 April1.

R21 is a modified form of a vaccine that has already been deployed in an ongoing study in hundreds of thousands of children in Malawi, Kenya and Ghana. That vaccine, called RTS,S or Mosquirix, is about 56% effective over one year, and 36% effective over four years.

R21 is designed to be both more potent and cheaper to produce than Mosquirix, says Kwadwo Koram, an epidemiologist at the University of Ghana in Accra. But it remains to be seen if the promising results from this trial, which was done in Nanoro, Burkina Faso, will hold up when the vaccine is tested in a larger study. “Now we all wait patiently to see what will come out,” says Koram. “If that shows 75% efficacy, then we would be very happy and jumping around.”

Researchers plan to test R21 in a larger trial of 4,800 children, which is slated to start next week, says Halidou Tinto, a lead author of the study and a parasitologist at the Health Sciences Research Institute in Nanoro. The team has also been working with the Serum Institute of India, a vaccine-manufacturing powerhouse in Pune that has pledged to produce at least 200 million doses of the vaccine each year if it is eventually authorized for use.

Slow progress
It took researchers less than a year to develop a roster of effective vaccines against COVID-19, but half a century of toil has still not yielded a vaccine against malaria that meets the World Health Organization’s efficacy goal. Part of the problem is low investment in preventing a disease that predominately affects low- and middle-income countries. Another issue is the malaria parasite (Plasmodium spp.) itself, which has a complex life cycle and the ability to mutate key proteins, generating fresh strains.

Initial hubris gave way to frustration as researchers realized that vaccines against malaria would be difficult to produce, says Nicholas White, who studies tropical medicine at Mahidol University in Bangkok. “People thought that it would be easy,” he says, “but it became increasingly clear that these parasites are clever.”

But the urgency has remained: malaria still kills about 400,000 people a year, most of them infants and children under the age of 5.

R21 and Mosquirix both target the malaria parasite in the sporozoite phase of its life cycle — the phase in which it enters the human body from its mosquito hosts. The vaccines include a protein secreted by the parasite at that stage, in the hope of stimulating an antibody response against it. R21 includes a higher concentration of these proteins.

Each of the vaccines is administered with a chemical called an adjuvant, which boosts immune responses to the inoculation. But the adjuvant used with R21 is easier to make than that used with Mosquirix, raising hopes that it could be cheaper, as well.

Still, White urges caution until larger trials have been conducted, noting that efficacy sometimes drops when studies are scaled up. “Definitely it’s exciting because of the possibility of large-scale production at relatively low cost,” he says. “But because it’s a small study, I don’t think you can say, ‘Wow, slam dunk, we’ve got a much better vaccine.’”

Lasting effects
Researchers will also be looking to see how durable the effects of the vaccine are. The R21 trial lasted for one year, but Burkina Faso is plagued by malaria for only about six months of each year, notes Stephen Hoffman, chief executive of Sanaria, a company in Rockville, Maryland, that is also developing malaria vaccines. During the second half of the study, there was only one case of malaria in the control group that did not receive the vaccine, Hoffman notes, making it impossible to judge whether the benefits of the vaccine lasted for the full year.

Researchers will continue to administer booster shots and follow the 450 participants for at least another year, says Tinto, and are hoping to extend the study for one to two years after that. The next, larger trial will also include countries in which malaria is a year-round threat, he says.

After Mosquirix, R21 is the candidate vaccine closest to widespread deployment, but researchers around the world are looking for ways to improve on these two vaccines, including targeting proteins expressed at different stages of the parasite’s life cycle. “I think R21 has now hit a ceiling for where we can go for this single-component vaccine,” says Stefan Kappe, who studies malaria-parasite biology and immunology at the Seattle Children’s Research Institute in Washington. “From here on out, we need to build on additional components.”

Kappe is collaborating with researchers at Sanaria who are looking for ways to inoculate people using a disabled version of the whole parasite, rather than individual proteins. The hope is that the approach will yield a broader and more durable immune response by exposing the immune system to the parasite’s full complement of proteins. But doing so will involve a series of technical challenges — including finding ways to grow the principal component of a vaccine, which must be aseptic, in mosquitoes.

For now, the R21 results are encouraging, says Koram. When coupled with other preventive measures, such as effective mosquito control, even a vaccine with less than 75% efficacy could help to reduce deaths, he says: “Every little piece is good.”

Nature 593, 17 (2021)

doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-021-01096-7
References
1.
Datoo, M. S. et al. Preprint at SSRN https://doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3830681 (2021).


covid has been a tragedy for the people who died, lost parents, or who will be left with long-term effects. It has been devastating on economies and livelihoods. Emergence of such a zoonotic virus predicted and with emergency plans in place could have been far better contained. The rapid development of vaccines has been remarkable. But it puts the dismal response to malaria in perspective.

Quote:
African malaria deaths set to dwarf covid-19 fatalities as pandemic hits control efforts, WHO warns
BMJ 2020; 371 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m4711 (Published 02 December 2020)


Excess malaria deaths caused by pandemic driven shortfalls in prevention and treatment efforts will probably dwarf direct deaths from covid-19 in sub-Saharan Africa, the World Health Organization has warned.

Progress against malaria—dramatic in the first decade of this century—had already stalled since 2016 as foreign donors drifted away. But 2020 is likely to be the first year in decades to see an increase in deaths, WHO warned in its 2020 World Malaria Report.1

About 1.5 billion malaria cases and 7.6 million deaths have been averted since 2000, WHO estimates. But annual case numbers in sub-Saharan Africa have been unchanged since 2016 at about 230 million, and this year the region will fall far short of milestones set by the World Health Assembly in 2015.

“It’s likely that excess malaria mortality is larger than direct covid-19 mortality,” said Pedro Alonso, director of WHO’s malaria programme. Malaria killed 409 000 people in 2019 and 411 000 in 2018, most of them babies and toddlers in sub-Saharan Africa. A 10% disruption in access to antimalarial treatment could lead to 19 000 additional deaths there this year, WHO warned. More plausible disruptions of 25% or 50% in the region could result in an additional 46 000 or 100 000 deaths, respectively. The total number of covid-19 deaths recorded so far in sub-Saharan Africa is just under 30 000, of which more than two thirds occurred in South Africa.

Peter Sands, executive director of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, said at a meeting presenting the new WHO report, “The global health world, the media, and politics are all transfixed by covid-19 and yet we pay little attention to a disease that is still killing over 400 000 people every year, mainly children. This is a disease we know how to get rid of—so it is a choice that we don’t.”

Aid agencies fear that sub-Saharan African children, the people least likely to be killed by covid-19, will be those most harmed by it in the long term. Many African governments have imposed stringent restrictions during the pandemic. Unlike Arabic speaking north Africa, most sub-Saharan countries have seen far fewer than 1000 direct deaths. But the indirect damage the pandemic has wrought is likely to persist for years.

More than 50 million children lost free meals because of school closures, which in many cases have persisted for months and continue today. At least 250 million have been pushed out of school, and there is almost no online learning, a deficit that is likely to impact the region’s earning power for decades to come.

The pandemic caused the first economic recession in modern African history—usually the continent posts high growth rates—and most of the 50 million people it has driven into extreme poverty are aged under 18. While the average G20 citizen has had $1652 (£1238; €1371) in coronavirus relief, the average sub-Saharan African has received $38.

Africa’s relative youth and inaccessibility continues to protect it from the pandemic’s worst direct effects. “It’s clear the second wave is here on the continent,” said John Nkengasong, director of the Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, last week. But, he added, “We’re not seeing hospitals being overwhelmed.”

Africa CDC hopes to begin vaccinations in the second quarter of 2021, said Nkengasong, although the cold storage requirements pose a special challenge. Vaccinating 60% of the population would cost about $12bn, he estimated.

“Africa is neglected when drugs are available,” he said. “The worst thing for the continent is for covid-19 to become an endemic disease.”

References
↵World Health Organization. World Malaria Report 2020. 30 November 2020. www.who.int/teams/global-malaria-programme/reports/world-malaria-report-2020.


African countries' role in this is often awful - corruption, war, petty power-grabbing, religious power-plays - all major factors in why malaria, polio and other diseases continue to kill and disable so many. But the west has blame too, for allowing drug development to be such a money-driven business.

No more excuses now, though. Malaria is very different from SARS-Cov2, of course. But the attitude is the same, of working to eliminate it, rather than saying it is just something people should have to put up with.

Here endeth the rant.
Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, June 8, 2021 10:17:56 AM

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Thar, let's hope they do find vaccines for malaria, HIV and others.

I wish they would spend some money on allergy research. Look at the billions in cost of just six countries for rhinitis and asthma, not to mention the misery. They usually measure food allergies in addition.

https://www.worldallergy.org/UserFiles/file/Economic-Burden-of-Allergy.pdf
Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, June 8, 2021 10:20:13 AM

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Joined: 3/23/2015
Posts: 10,088
Neurons: 57,539
Location: Kitchener, Ontario, Canada
This was in my email today from Lancet - repurposing drugs for Covid19.

Repurposing Drugs for Covid19
thar
Posted: Wednesday, June 9, 2021 8:10:12 PM

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Actually lots of good things happening in terms of endemic disease.

Possibility of very positive results in trials for denge that could help with other viruses like zika, yellow fever and chikungunya.
Give up killing the mosquitoes and use them instead.
Although I'm always a bit wary of 'the enemy of my enemy is my friend' approach to animal control. Can just end up with a worse enemy!

But when you feel you have to stop an randomised control trial because the results are so strong it is unethical to not do the new process everywhere - that is always a positive sign!

https://www.worldmosquitoprogram.org/

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